Duke of St Albans

Last updated

Dukedom of St Albans
Coronet of a British Duke.svg
Blason Charles II Beauclerk (1696-1751) 2e duc de Saint-Albans.svg
Arms of Murray de Vere Beauclerk, 14th Duke of St Albans: Grand quarterly, 1st and 4th grand quarters: the Royal Arms of Charles II, viz quarterly: 1st and 4th, France and England quarterly; 2nd, Scotland; 3rd, Ireland; the whole debruised by a baton sinister gules charged with three roses argent barbed and seeded proper (Lennox [1] ); 2nd and 3rd grand quarters: quarterly gules and or, in the first quarter a mullet argent (De Vere). (Arms of the 2nd Duke onwards)
Creation date10 January 1684
Monarch Charles II
Peerage Peerage of England
First holder Charles Beauclerk, 1st Duke of St Albans
Present holder Murray Beauclerk, 14th Duke
Heir apparent Charles Beauclerk, Earl of Burford
Remainder tothe 1st Duke's heirs male of the body lawfully begotten
Subsidiary titlesEarl of Burford
Baron Heddington
Baron Vere
MottoAuspicium melioris aevi ("A pledge of better times") [2]

Duke of St Albans is a title in the Peerage of England. It was created in 1684 for Charles Beauclerk, 1st Earl of Burford, then fourteen years old. King Charles II had accepted that Burford was his illegitimate son by Eleanor Gwynn (commonly known as 'Nell'), an actress, and awarded him the Dukedom just as he had conferred the Dukedoms of Monmouth, Southampton, Grafton, Northumberland and Richmond and Lennox on his other illegitimate sons.

Contents

The subsidiary titles of the Duke are: Earl of Burford, in the County of Oxford (1676), Baron Heddington, in the County of Oxford (1676) and Baron Vere, of Hanworth in the County of Middlesex (1750). The Earldom and the Barony of Heddington are in the Peerage of England, and the Barony of Vere is in the Peerage of Great Britain. The Dukes of St Albans also bear the hereditary title of Grand Falconer of England, and Hereditary Registrar of the Court of Chancery.

The eldest son and heir of the Duke of St Albans is known by the courtesy title Earl of Burford, and Lord Burford's eldest son and heir is known as Lord Vere.

Recent Dukes of St Albans have not held a landed estate. Former seats of the Dukes of St Albans were Bestwood Lodge in Nottinghamshire, now a hotel, [3] and Upper Gatton Park in Surrey. [4]

The accepted pronunciation of the family surname Beauclerk is reflected in the original alternative rendering Beauclaire: boh-clair. [5]

Dukes of St Albans (1684)

Arms of the 1st Duke of St Albans Duke of St Albans coa.png
Arms of the 1st Duke of St Albans
Other titles: Earl of Burford, in the county of Oxford, and Baron Heddington, in the county of Oxford (1676)
Other titles (5th Duke onwards): Baron Vere, of Hanworth in the county of Middlesex (1750)

The heir apparent is Charles Francis Topham de Vere Beauclerk, Earl of Burford (b. 1965) (only son of the 14th Duke).

The heir apparent's heir apparent is his only son, James Malcolm Aubrey Edward de Vere Beauclerk, Lord Vere (b. 1995).

Barons Vere (1750)

for subsequent Barons Vere see Dukes of St Albans above

Line of succession

  1. Charles Francis Topham de Vere Beauclerk, Earl of Burford (b. 1965) (only son of the 14th Duke)
  2. James Malcolm Aubrey Edward de Vere Beauclerk, Lord Vere (b. 1995) (only son of Lord Burford)
  3. Lord Peter Charles de Vere Beauclerk (b. 1948) (second son of the 13th Duke)
  4. Tenzin Beauclerk (b. 2005) (younger but only surviving son of Lord Peter)
  5. Lord James Charles Fesq de Vere Beauclerk (b. 1949) (third son of the 13th Duke)
  6. Lord John William Aubrey de Vere Beauclerk (b. 1950) (youngest son of the 13th Duke)
  7. William Rafael Beauclerk, Marques de Valero de Urria (great-great-great-great-grandson of Lord Sidney Beauclerk, fifth son of the 1st Duke)
  8. Alexander Charles Beauclerk (b. 1990) (elder son of the Marques de Valero de Urria)
  9. Cameron Beauclerk (b. 1993) (younger son of the Marques de Valero de Urria)

Only those at positions 1 to 6 are in remainder to the Barony of Vere.

Arms

Coat of arms of Duke of St Albans
Coat of arms of the duke of Saint Albans.png
Coronet
A Duke's coronet
Crest
On a Chapeau Gules turned up Ermine a Lion statant guardant Or crowned with a ducal coronet per pale Argent and of the First and gorged with a Collar of the Last thereon three Roses also Argent barbed and seeded Proper
Escutcheon
Grand quarterly, 1st and 4th grand quarters: the Royal Arms of Charles II, viz quarterly: 1st and 4th, France and England quarterly; 2nd, Scotland; 3rd, Ireland; the whole debruised by a Baton sinister Gules charged with three Roses Argent barbed and seeded Proper (Beauclerk); 2nd and 3rd grand quarters: quarterly Gules and Or in the first quarter a Mullet Argent (De Vere)
Supporters
Dexter: an Antelope Argent armed and unguled Or; Sinister: a Greyhound Argent, each gorged with a Collar as in the Crest
Motto
Auspicium Melioris Aevi (A pledge of better times)


Family tree

Beauclerk family tree: Dukes of St. Albans

See also

Notes

  1. The Scottish Earldom of Lennox had merged into the crown on the accession of King James I & VI, whose father Henry Stewart, Lord Darnley was the heir presumptive to that earldom, the king was thus at liberty to re-award the Lennox arms, or versions of them, as he pleased
  2. Debrett's Peerage, 1876, p.411
  3. Sale brochure for Upper Gatton Park, June 2016.
  4. British Museum – Madame Ellen Groinn

Related Research Articles

Duke of Abercorn Irish title

The title Duke of Abercorn is a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created in 1868 and bestowed upon James Hamilton, 2nd Marquess of Abercorn. Although the Dukedom is in the Peerage of Ireland, it refers to Abercorn, West Lothian, and the Duke also bears four titles in Peerage of Scotland and two in the Peerage of Great Britain, and is one of only three peers who have titles in those three peerages. The Duke of Abercorn also claims the French title of Duke of Châtellerault, created in 1548.

Earl of Oxford title in the Peerage of England

Earl of Oxford is a dormant title in the Peerage of England, first created for Edgar the Atheling and held by him from 1066 to 1068, and later offered to Aubrey III de Vere by the Empress Matilda in 1141, one of four counties he could choose if Cambridgeshire was held by the King of Scotland. On Aubrey's acceptance, his family was to hold the title for more than five and a half centuries, until the death of the 20th Earl in 1703. The de Veres were also hereditary holders of the office of Master Chamberlain of England from 1133 until the death of the 18th Earl in 1625. Their primary seat was Hedingham Castle in Essex, but they held lands in southern England and the Midlands, particularly in eastern England. The actual earldom was called 'Oxenford' until at least the end of the 17th century. Medieval sources thus refer to 'my lord of Oxenford' when speaking of the earl.

Duke of Hamilton title in the Peerage of Scotland

Duke of Hamilton is a title in the Peerage of Scotland, created in 1643. It is the senior dukedom in that Peerage, and as such its holder is the Premier Peer of Scotland, as well as being head of both the House of Hamilton and the House of Douglas. The title, the town of Hamilton in Lanarkshire, and many places around the world are named after members of the Hamilton family. The Ducal family's surname, originally "Hamilton", is now "Douglas-Hamilton". Since 1711, the Dukedom has been held together with the Dukedom of Brandon in the Peerage of Great Britain, and the Dukes since that time have been styled Duke of Hamilton and Brandon, along with several other subsidiary titles.

Duke of Beaufort Title in the Peerage of England

Duke of Beaufort, a title in the Peerage of England, was created by Charles II in 1682 for Henry Somerset, 3rd Marquess of Worcester, a descendant of Charles Somerset, 1st Earl of Worcester, legitimized son of Henry Beaufort, 3rd Duke of Somerset, a Lancastrian leader in the Wars of the Roses. The name Beaufort refers to a castle in Champagne, France. It is the only current dukedom to take its name from a place outside the British Isles.

Duke of Bedford Title in the Peerage of England

Duke of Bedford is a title that has been created six times in the Peerage of England. The first and second creations came in 1414 in favour of Henry IV's third son, John, who later served as regent of France. He was made Earl of Kendal at the same time and was made Earl of Richmond later the same year. The titles became extinct on his death in 1435. The third creation came in 1470 in favour of George Neville, nephew of Warwick the Kingmaker. He was deprived of the title by Act of Parliament in 1478. The fourth creation came 1478 in favour of George, the third son of Edward IV. He died the following year at the age of two. The fifth creation came in 1485 in favour of Jasper Tudor, half-brother of Henry VI and uncle of Henry VII. He had already been created Earl of Pembroke in 1452. However, as he was a Lancastrian, his title was forfeited between 1461 and 1485 during the predominance of the House of York. He regained the earldom in 1485 when his nephew Henry VII came to the throne and was elevated to the dukedom the same year. He had no legitimate children and the titles became extinct on his death in 1495.

Earl of Portland Title in the Peerage of England

Earl of Portland is a title that has been created twice in the Peerage of England, first in 1633 and again in 1689. What proved to be a long co-held title, Duke of Portland, was created in 1716 and ceased in 1990 on the death of the ninth Duke, when the Earldom passed to the seniormost agnatic cousin, namely one of the 6th degree.

Earl Cadogan

Earl Cadogan is a title that has been created twice in the Peerage of Great Britain for the Cadogan family. The second creation, in 1800, was for Charles Cadogan, 3rd Baron Cadogan.

Charles Beauclerk, 1st Duke of St Albans British Duke

Charles Beauclerk, 1st Duke of St Albans, KG was an illegitimate son of King Charles II of England by his mistress Nell Gwyn.

Charles Francis Topham de Vere Beauclerk is a British aristocrat who is heir to the title Duke of St Albans. Beauclerk first came to public attention when he attempted to interfere with a debate in the House of Lords, declaring a bill which would exclude hereditary the House to be treasonable. He is a writer and exponent of the Oxfordian theory of Shakespeare authorship. Before 2000 he was styled by the courtesy title Earl of Burford, however he chooses not to use this title, believing it to be worthless since most hereditary peers were removed from political office by the House of Lords Act 1999.

Murray Beauclerk, 14th Duke of St Albans British Duke

Murray de Vere Beauclerk, 14th Duke of St Albans,, styled Earl of Burford from 1964 until 1988, is an English peer of the Realm.

Beauclerk or Beauclerc is an English surname, from Anglo-Norman meaning "fine scholar". It is also the family name of the Duke of St Albans.

Charles Beauclerk, 2nd Duke of St Albans British politician

Charles Beauclerk, 2nd Duke of St Albans, KG KB was a British politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1718 until 1726 when he succeeded to a peerage as Duke of St Albans. He was an illegitimate grandson of King Charles II.

Aubrey Beauclerk, 5th Duke of St Albans British Duke

Aubrey Beauclerk, 5th Duke of St Albans was a British landowner, and a collector of antiquities and works of art.

Aubrey Beauclerk, 6th Duke of St Albans Duke of St Albans

Aubrey Beauclerk, 6th Duke of St Albans was an English aristocrat and politician.

William Beauclerk, 10th Duke of St Albans British Liberal politician

William Amelius Aubrey de Vere Beauclerk, 10th Duke of St Albans, PC DL, styled Earl of Burford until 1849, was a British Liberal parliamentarian of the Victorian era.

Diana Beauclerk, Duchess of St Albans British courtier

Diana Beauclerk, Duchess of St Albans, born Lady Diana de Vere, was a British courtier. She was Mistress of the Robes to Caroline, Princess of Wales from 1714 to 1717. She was one of the Hampton Court Beauties of Mary II of England.

Lord Sidney Beauclerk British politician

Lord Sidney Beauclerk was a British politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1733 to 1744. He acquired a reputation as a fortune hunter.

de Vere family English aristocratic family

The de Vere family were an English aristocratic family who derived their surname from Ver, in Lower Normandy, France. The family's Norman founder in England, Aubrey (Albericus) de Vere, appears in Domesday Book (1086) as the holder of a large fief in Essex, Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire, and Suffolk. His son and heir Aubrey II became Lord Great Chamberlain of England, an hereditary office, in 1133. His grandson Aubrey III became Earl of Oxford in the reign of King Stephen, but while his earldom had been granted by the Empress Matilda and eventually recognised by Stephen, it was not until January 1156 that it was formally recognised by Henry II and he began to receive the third penny of justice from Oxfordshire.

Ralph Beauclerk British spy

Rafael Charles (Ralph) Beauclerk (1917–2007), 6th Marquis de Valero de Urría, was in remainder to the dukedom of Saint Albans.

Lord William Beauclerk was a British army officer and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1724 to 1733.

References

Further reading