The Right Honourable

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The Right Honourable (The Rt Hon. or Rt Hon.) is an honorific style traditionally applied to certain persons and collective bodies in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, some other Commonwealth realms, the English-speaking Caribbean, Mauritius, Zimbabwe, Malawi, and occasionally elsewhere. The term is predominantly used today as a style associated with the holding of certain senior public offices in the United Kingdom, Canada, and New Zealand.

An honorific is a title that conveys esteem, courtesy, or respect for position or rank when used in addressing or referring to a person. Sometimes, the term "honorific" is used in a more specific sense to refer to an honorary academic title. It is also often conflated with systems of honorific speech in linguistics, which are grammatical or morphological ways of encoding the relative social status of speakers.

A style of office, honorific or manner/form of address, is an official or legally recognized form of address, and may often be used in conjunction with a title. A style, by tradition or law, precedes a reference to a person who holds a post or political office, and is sometimes used to refer to the office itself. An honorific can also be awarded to an individual in a personal capacity. Such styles are particularly associated with monarchies, where they may be used by a wife of an office holder or of a prince of the blood, for the duration of their marriage. They are also almost universally used for presidents in republics and in many countries for members of legislative bodies, higher-ranking judges and senior constitutional office holders. Leading religious figures also have styles.

United Kingdom Country in Europe

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country located off the north-western coast of the European mainland. The United Kingdom includes the island of Great Britain, the north-eastern part of the island of Ireland, and many smaller islands. Northern Ireland is the only part of the United Kingdom that shares a land border with another sovereign state, the Republic of Ireland. Apart from this land border, the United Kingdom is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea to the east, the English Channel to the south and the Celtic Sea to the south-west, giving it the 12th-longest coastline in the world. The Irish Sea lies between Great Britain and Ireland. The UK's 242,500 square kilometres (93,600 sq mi) were home to an estimated 66.0 million inhabitants in 2017.

Contents

Most uses of this style in the United Kingdom now indicate membership of the Privy Council.

Privy Council of the United Kingdom Formal body of advisers to the sovereign in the United Kingdom

Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, usually known simply as the Privy Council of the United Kingdom or just the Privy Council, is a formal body of advisers to the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. Its membership mainly comprises senior politicians who are current or former members of either the House of Commons or the House of Lords.

"Right" in this context is an adverb meaning "thoroughly" or "very".

Adverb word that modifies a verb, adjective, or another adverb

An adverb is a word that modifies a verb, adjective, determiner, clause, preposition, or sentence. Adverbs typically express manner, place, time, frequency, degree, level of certainty, etc., answering questions such as how?, in what way?, when?, where?, and to what extent?. This function is called the adverbial function, and may be realized by single words (adverbs) or by multi-word expressions.

Collective entities

"The Right Honourable" is added as a prefix to the name of various collective entities such as:

House of Lords upper house in the Parliament of the United Kingdom

The House of Lords, also known as the House of Peers, is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Membership is granted by appointment or else by heredity or official function. Like the House of Commons, it meets in the Palace of Westminster. Officially, the full name of the house is the Right Honourable the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled.

Board of Admiralty authority with administrative and operational control of the Royal Navy

The Board of Admiralty was established in 1628 when Charles I put the office of Lord High Admiral into commission. As that position was not always occupied, the purpose was to enable management of the day-to-day operational requirements of the Royal Navy; at that point administrative control of the navy was still the responsibility of the Navy Board, established in 1546. This system remained in place until 1832, when the Board of Admiralty became the sole authority charged with both administrative and operational control of the navy when the Navy Board was abolished. The term Admiralty has become synonymous with the command and control of the Royal Navy, partly personified in the Board of Admiralty and in the Admiralty buildings in London from where operations were in large part directed. It existed until 1964 when the office of First Lord of the Admiralty was finally abolished and the functions of the Lords Commissioners were transferred to the new Admiralty Board and the tri-service Defence Council of the United Kingdom.

Board of Trade committee of the United Kingdom Privy Council

The Board of Trade is a British government department concerned with commerce and industry, currently within the Department for International Trade. Its full title is The Lords of the Committee of the Privy Council appointed for the consideration of all matters relating to Trade and Foreign Plantations, but is commonly known as the Board of Trade, and formerly known as the Lords of Trade and Plantations or Lords of Trade, and it has been a committee of the Privy Council of the United Kingdom. The Board has gone through several evolutions, beginning with extensive involvement in colonial matters in the 17th Century, to powerful regulatory functions in the Victorian Era, to virtually being dormant in the last third of 20th century. In 2017, it was revitalized as an advisory board headed by the International Trade Secretary who has nominally held the title of President of the Board of Trade, and who at present is the only privy counsellor of the Board, the other members of the present Board filling roles as advisers.

See also the collective use of "Most Honourable", as in "The Lords of Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council" (the Privy Council).

Use of the honorific

The honorific is normally used only on the front of envelopes or other written documents.

In the House of Commons, Members of Parliament refer to members not as "the honourable member for ... (constituency)" but as "the right honourable member for ..." if they are Privy Councillors but now hold no ministry. To save having to recall constituency names in direct replies, the use of "the honourable lady/gentleman/member" or "the Minister (often, for department)/Chancellor/Prime Minister" is available to refer to members not in their own party (or coalition) where the person referred to has already spoken. Similarly, those in their own party are referred to as "my honourable friend" or, for Privy Councillors, "my right honourable friend". Other honorifics used in addition for those members in relevant professions (for example, "honourable and reverend", [3] "honourable and gallant" [4] and "honourable and learned" [5] ) are also used in the Commons. [6]

Generally within the Commonwealth, ministers and judges are The Honourable unless they are appointed to the Privy Council of the United Kingdom, in which case they are The Right Honourable. Such persons generally include prime ministers and judges of the Court of Appeal of New Zealand, and several other Commonwealth prime ministers. Provided they are Commonwealth citizens, foreign judges appointed to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council are entitled to the honorific as well, although the appellation may be ignored in the judge's home country.

United Kingdom

The prefix is customarily abbreviated to "The" in many situations,[ example needed ] but never for Privy Counsellors. [7] The following persons are entitled to the style in a personal capacity:

The following persons are entitled to the style ex officio . The style is added to the name of the office, not the name of the person:

All other Lord Mayors are "The Right Worshipful"; other Lords Provost do not use an honorific. By the 1920s, a number of city mayors, including that of Leeds, [12] were unofficially using the prefix "The Right Honourable", and the matter was consequently raised in Parliament. The Lord Mayor of Bristol at present still uses the prefix "Right Honourable", without official sanction. [13] [14] The Chairman of the London County Council (LCC) was granted the style in 1935 as part of the celebrations of the silver jubilee of King George V. [15] The chairman of the Greater London Council, the body that replaced the LCC in 1965, was similarly granted the prefix, [16] but that body, and by extension the office of its chairman, was likewise abolished in 1986.

Privy Counsellors are appointed for life by the Monarch, on the advice of the prime minister. All members of the British Cabinet (technically a committee of the Privy Council) are appointed to the Privy Council, as are certain other senior ministers in the government and leaders of the major political parties. The Privy Council thus includes all current and former members of the Cabinet of the United Kingdom, excepting those who have resigned from the Privy Council. The First Ministers of Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland are also so appointed.

In order to differentiate peers who are Privy Counsellors from those who are not, the suffix "PC" should be added after the name (according to Debrett's Peerage (2015) [17] [18] [19] ). This is not however considered correct by Who's Who (2002). [20]

Australia

In Australia some premiers of the Australian colonies in the 19th century were appointed members of HM Privy Council and were thus entitled to be called The Right Honourable. After federation in 1901, the Governor-General, the Chief Justice of the High Court of Australia, the Prime Minister and some other senior ministers held the title.

In 1972 Labor Prime Minister Gough Whitlam declined appointment to the Privy Council. The practice was resumed by Malcolm Fraser in 1975, but Bob Hawke declined the appointment in 1983. The last Governor-General to be entitled to the style was Sir Ninian Stephen. The last politician to be entitled to the style was Ian Sinclair, who retired in 1998. In 2001, Sir Robert May was elevated to the UK peerage as Baron May of Oxford, which carries with it the style The Right Honourable.

Australians holding certain hereditary peerages in the grades of Baron, Viscount and Earl also use the Right Honourable title. The Lord Mayors of Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, [21] Perth, Adelaide and Hobart are styled the Rt Hon. The style (which has no connection with the Privy Council) attaches to the title of Lord Mayor, not to their names, and is relinquished upon leaving office.

Living Australians holding the title The Right HonourableReasonFormerly
Doug Anthony, AC, CHMember of the Privy CouncilFormer Deputy Prime Minister of Australia
Ian Sinclair, ACMember of the Privy CouncilFormer Speaker of the Australian House of Representatives
Sir William Heseltine, GCB, GCVO, ACMember of the Privy CouncilFormer Private Secretary to the Sovereign
Robert May, Baron May of Oxford, OM, AC Life peer Former Chief Scientific Adviser to the UK Government
Trixie Gardner, Baroness Gardner of Parkes, AM, JP Life peer Former Councillor on the Westminster City Council
Malcolm Murray, 12th Earl of Dunmore Earl of Dunmore Former Member of the House of Lords
Robert Fiennes-Clinton, 19th Earl of Lincoln Earl of Lincoln
Simon Abney-Hastings, 15th Earl of Loudoun Earl of Loudoun
George Dawson-Damer, 7th Earl of Portarlington Earl of Portarlington
Keith Rous, 6th Earl of Stradbroke Earl of Stradbroke
Francis Grosvenor, 8th Earl of Wilton Earl of Wilton
Nicholas St John, 9th Viscount Bolingbroke, 10th Viscount St John Viscount Bolingbroke
Charles Cavendish, 7th Baron Chesham Baron Chesham
James Lindsay, 3rd Baron Lindsay of Birker Baron Lindsay of Birker
David Campbell, 7th Baron Stratheden and Campbell Baron Stratheden

Canada

In Canada, only occupants of the most senior public offices are styled as "The Right Honourable" (Le très honorable is the French term used by the federal government). Formerly, this was by virtue of their appointment to the Privy Council of the United Kingdom. However, Canadian appointments to the British Privy Council were ended by the government of Lester Pearson. Since then, individuals who hold, or have held, one of the following offices are awarded the style of Right Honourable for life:

The style may also be granted for life by the Governor General to eminent Canadians who have not held any of the offices that would otherwise entitle them to the style. It has been granted to the following individuals:

Governors general also use the style "His/Her Excellency" during their term of office. Members of the Privy Council and the Senate receive the honorific "The Honourable". The style of Right Honourable does not apply to any official at the provincial level.

Living Canadians holding the title The Right Honourable
PersonBirthplaceReasonBornGranted
Justin Trudeau Ottawa, ON Prime Minister 19712015
Stephen Harper Toronto, ON Former Prime Minister 19592006
Paul Martin Windsor, ON Former Prime Minister 19382003
Jean Chrétien Shawinigan, QC Former Prime Minister 19341993
Kim Campbell Port Alberni, BC Former Prime Minister 19471993
Brian Mulroney Baie-Comeau, QC Former Prime Minister 19391984
John Turner United Kingdom Former Prime Minister 19291984
Joe Clark High River, AB Former Prime Minister 19391979
Julie Payette Montreal, QC Governor General 19632017
David Johnston Sudbury, ON Former Governor General 19412010
Michaëlle Jean Haiti Former Governor General 19572005
Adrienne Clarkson Hong Kong Former Governor General 19391999
Ed Schreyer Beausejour, MB Former Governor General 19351979
Richard Wagner Montreal, QC Chief Justice 19572017
Beverley McLachlin Pincher Creek, AB Former Chief Justice 19432000
Don Mazankowski Viking, AB Honorific19351992

Over the years, a number of prominent Canadians became members of the Privy Council of the United Kingdom and thus were entitled to use the style of Right Honourable, either because of their services in Britain (e.g. serving as envoys to London) or as members of the Imperial War Cabinet, or due to their prominence in the Canadian Cabinet.

Before the style of Right Honourable came into use for all Canadian prime ministers, three prime ministers did not have the style as they were not members of the Privy Council of the United Kingdom. These three were the Hon. Alexander Mackenzie, the Hon. Sir John Abbott and the Hon. Sir Mackenzie Bowell.

Canadians who held the title before the Pearson government's reforms include:

Notes
  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 As Prime Minister.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 As Chief Justice of Canada
  3. Duff did not become Chief Justice until 1933
  4. Massey became Governor General over a decade later. He was made "Right Honourable" while serving as Canada's High Commissioner to London.
  5. Tupper was appointed when he was no longer Prime Minister and St. Laurent was appointed when he was a cabinet minister under Mackenzie King.
  6. As Governor General of Canada

Sri Lanka

In Sri Lanka (formerly known as Ceylon) the British practice was followed with Ceylonese members of the Privy Council of the United Kingdom were styled The Right Honourable and was referred to as "Mahamanya" in Sinhalese. Ceylonese appointees to the privy council include, D.S. Senanayake and Sir John Kotelawala. [22]

Ireland

Members of the Privy Council of Ireland were entitled to be addressed as The Right Honourable, even after the Privy Council ceased to have any functions or to meet on the creation of the Irish Free State in December 1922. Nevertheless, the Lord Mayor of Dublin, like some of his counterparts in Great Britain, retained the use of the honorific style as a result of its having been conferred separately by legislation; in 2001 it was removed, as a consequence of local government law reform.

New Zealand

In New Zealand, the prime minister and some other senior cabinet ministers were customarily appointed to the Privy Council of the United Kingdom and thus styled The Right Honourable. [23]

In her resignation honours, the former prime minister Helen Clark did not recommend the appointment of any new Privy Councillors, and at present Winston Peters is the sole Privy Councillor in the New Zealand parliament. Privy Councillors recently retired from parliament include Clark, the former Speaker of the House Jonathan Hunt, and the former prime minister Jenny Shipley. [24] In 2009 it was announced that the new Prime Minister John Key had decided not to make any further recommendations to the Crown for appointments to the Privy Council. [25]

In August 2010, the Queen of New Zealand announced that, with immediate effect, individuals who hold, and those persons who after the date of the signing of these rules are appointed to, the following offices are awarded the style The Right Honourable for life: [23]

This change was made because the practice of appointing New Zealanders to the Privy Council of the United Kingdom had ceased. However, the change had little immediate effect, as all but two of the holders or living former holders of the offices granted the style had already been appointed to the Privy Council. [26] [27]

The living New Zealanders holding the style "The Right Honourable" as a result of membership of the Privy Council are:

The living New Zealanders holding the style "The Right Honourable" for life as a result of the 2010 changes are:

NameTitleDate Appointed
Sir Anand Satyanand Former Governor-General2 August 2010
Sir John Key Former Prime Minister
Sir Lockwood Smith Former Speaker of the House of Representatives
Sir Jerry Mateparae Former Governor-General31 August 2011
David Carter Former Speaker of the House of Representatives1 February 2013
Dame Patsy Reddy Governor-General28 September 2016
Sir Bill English Former Prime Minister12 December 2016
Jacinda Ardern Prime Minister26 October 2017
Trevor Mallard Speaker of the House of Representatives7 November 2017
Dame Helen Winklemann Chief Justice14 March 2019

Kenya

The second prime minister Raila Amolo Odinga (2008 - 2013) has been referred to as Rt. Honourable Raila Odinga.[ citation needed ]

See also

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  2. The Governor-General or, while acting in the place of the Governor-General, the officer administering the Government
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  13. Members of the House of Representatives. There is no established order of precedence over members of parliament in general, although each party has its internal ranking.
  14. Judges of the Supreme Court of New Zealand, the Court of Appeal and the High Court of New Zealand.
  15. Former Prime Ministers, former Speakers of the House of Representatives, former Chief Justices, and members of the Privy Council.
  16. Mayors of territorial authorities and chairpersons of regional councils, while in their own cities, districts and regions. In 1989, boroughs and counties were amalgamated into district councils. District mayors, and the Chatham Islands mayor could expect to be accorded this same precedence.
  17. The State Services Commissioner, Chief of Defence Force, Commissioner of Police, and Officers of Parliament .
  18. The Solicitor-General, Clerk of the House of Representatives, and Clerk of the Executive Council when attending a function involving the exercise of the position’s specific responsibilities.
  19. Chief executives of public service and non-public service departments.
  20. The Vice Chief of Defence Force, and Chiefs of Navy, Army and Air Force, and other statutory office holders.
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The following is the Australian Table of Precedence.

  1. The Queen of Australia: Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II
  2. The Governor-General of Australia: His Excellency General The Honourable Sir Peter Cosgrove
  3. Governors of states in order of appointment:
    1. Governor of Queensland His Excellency The Honourable Paul de Jersey
    2. Governor of South Australia His Excellency The Honourable Hieu Van Le
    3. Governor of Tasmania Her Excellency Professor The Honourable Kate Warner
    4. Governor of Victoria Her Excellency The Honourable Linda Dessau
    5. Governor of Western Australia His Excellency The Honourable Kim Beazley
    6. Governor of New South Wales Her Excellency The Honourable Margaret Beazley
  4. The Prime Minister The Honourable Scott Morrison MP
  5. The President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives in order of appointment:
    1. Speaker of the House of Representatives The Honourable Tony Smith MP
    2. President of the Senate Senator The Honourable Scott Ryan
  6. The Chief Justice of Australia The Honourable Susan Kiefel
  7. Senior diplomatic posts:
    1. Ambassadors and High Commissioners in order of date of presentation of the Letters of Credence or Commission
    2. Chargés d'affaires en pied or en titre in order of date of presentation of the Letters of Credence or Commission
    3. Chargés d'affaires and Acting High Commissioners in order of date of assumption of duties
  8. Members of the Federal Executive Council:
    1. Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure and Transport
    2. Treasurer
    3. Minister for Regional Services, Sport, Local Government and Decentralisation
    4. Minister for Finance and the Public Sector and Vice President of the Executive Council
    5. Minister for Indigenous Affairs
    6. Minister for Defence
    7. Minister for Defence Industry
    8. Minister for Foreign Affairs
    9. Minister for Trade, Tourism and Investment
    10. Attorney-General
    11. Minister for Home Affairs
    12. Minister for Communications and Minister for the Arts
    13. Minister for Jobs and Industrial Relations and Minister for Women
    14. Minister for Small and Family Business, Skills and Vocational Education
    15. Minister for Resources and Northern Australia
    16. Minister for Industry, Science and Technology
    17. Minister for Education
    18. Minister for Health
    19. Minister for Families and Social Services
    20. Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources
    21. Minister for the Environment
    22. Minister for Energy
    23. Minister for Cities, Urban Infrastructure and Population
    24. Assistant Treasurer
    25. Special Minister of State
    26. Minister for Veterans' Affairs, Minister for Defence Personnel and Minister Assisting the Prime Minister for the Centenary of ANZAC
    27. Minister for Immigration, Citizenship and Multicultural Affairs
    28. Minister for Senior Australians and Aged Care and Minister for Indigenous Health
    29. Minister for Human Services and Digital Transformation
    30. Assistant Minister to the Prime Minister
    31. Assistant Minister for Regional Development and Territories
    32. Assistant Minister to the Deputy Prime Minister
    33. Assistant Minister for Roads and Transport
    34. Assistant Minister for Treasury and Finance
    35. Assistant Minister for Defence
    36. Assistant Minister for International Development and the Pacific
    37. Assistant Minister for Trade, Tourism and Investment
    38. Assistant Minister for Home Affairs
    39. Assistant Minister for Social Services, Housing and Disability Services
    40. Assistant Minister for Children and Families
    41. Assistant Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources
  9. Administrators of Territories in order of appointment:
    1. Administrator of Norfolk Island
    2. Administrator of the Australian Indian Ocean Territories
    3. Administrator of the Northern Territory
  10. The Leader of the Opposition The Honourable Bill Shorten MP
  11. Former holders of high offices:
    1. Former Governors-General in order of leaving office:
      1. Bill Hayden (1989–1996)
      2. Sir William Deane (1996–2001)
      3. Dr Peter Hollingworth (2001–2003)
      4. Major General Michael Jeffery (2003–2008)
      5. Dame Quentin Bryce (2008–2014)
    2. Former Prime Ministers in order of leaving office:
      1. Paul Keating (1991–1996)
      2. John Howard (1996–2007)
      3. Kevin Rudd
      4. Julia Gillard (2010–2013)
      5. Tony Abbott (2013–2015)
      6. Malcolm Turnbull (2015–2018)
    3. Former Chief Justices in order of leaving office:
      1. Sir Anthony Mason (1987–1995)
      2. Sir Gerard Brennan (1995–1998)
      3. Murray Gleeson (1998–2008)
      4. Robert French (2008–2017)
  12. Premiers of states in order of state populations, then the Chief Minister of the Northern Territory:
    1. Premier of New South Wales
    2. Premier of Victoria
    3. Premier of Queensland
    4. Premier of Western Australia
    5. Premier of South Australia
    6. Premier of Tasmania
    7. Chief Minister of the Northern Territory
  13. Justices of the High Court in order of appointment:
    1. Virginia Bell
    2. Stephen Gageler
    3. Patrick Keane
    4. Geoffrey Nettle
    5. Michelle Gordon
    6. James Edelman
  14. Senior judges:
    1. Chief Justice of the Federal Court of Australia
    2. President of the Fair Work Commission
  15. Chief Justices of States in order of appointment:
    1. Chief Justice of New South Wales
    2. Chief Justice of South Australia
    3. Chief Justice of Tasmania
    4. Chief Justice of Queensland
    5. Chief Justice of Victoria
    6. Chief Justice of Western Australia
  16. Australian members of the Privy Council of the United Kingdom in order of appointment:
    1. Doug Anthony
    2. Ian Sinclair
    3. Sir William Heseltine
  17. The Chief of the Defence Force
  18. Chief Judges of Federal and Territory Courts in order of appointment
    1. Chief Justice of the Australian Capital Territory
    2. Chief Justice of the Northern Territory
    3. Chief Justice of the Family Court of Australia
  19. Members of Parliament
  20. Judges of the Federal Court of Australia and Family Court of Australia, and Deputy presidents of the Fair Work Commission in order of appointment
  21. Lord Mayors of capital cities in order of city populations:
    1. Lord Mayor of Sydney
    2. Lord Mayor of Melbourne
    3. Lord Mayor of Brisbane
    4. Lord Mayor of Perth
    5. Lord Mayor of Adelaide
    6. Lord Mayor of Hobart
    7. Lord Mayor of Darwin
  22. Heads of religious communities according to the date of assuming office in Australia
  23. Presiding officers of State Legislatures in order of appointment, then Presiding Officer of the Northern Territory legislature:
    1. Speaker of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly
    2. President of the New South Wales Legislative Council
    3. Speaker of the Victorian Legislative Assembly
    4. Speaker of the Western Australian Legislative Assembly
    5. President of the Western Australian Legislative Council
    6. Speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Queensland
    7. Speaker of the Tasmanian House of Assembly
    8. President of the South Australian Legislative Council
    9. Speaker of the South Australian House of Assembly
    10. President of the Victorian Legislative Council
    11. President of the Tasmanian Legislative Council
    12. Speaker of the Northern Territory Legislative Assembly
  24. Members of State Executive Councils in order of state populations, and then members of the Northern Territory Executive Council:
    1. Executive Council of New South Wales
    2. Executive Council of Victoria
    3. Executive Council of Queensland
    4. Executive Council of Western Australia
    5. Executive Council of South Australia
    6. Executive Council of Tasmania
    7. Executive Council of the Northern Territory
  25. Leaders of the Opposition of State Legislatures in order of state populations, then in the Northern Territory:
    1. Leader of the Opposition of New South Wales
    2. Leader of the Opposition of Victoria
    3. Leader of the Opposition of Queensland
    4. Leader of the Opposition of Western Australia
    5. Leader of the Opposition of South Australia
    6. Leader of the Opposition of Tasmania
    7. Leader of the Opposition of the Northern Territory
  26. Judges of State and Territory Supreme Courts in order of appointment:
    1. Supreme Court of New South Wales
    2. Supreme Court of Victoria
    3. Supreme Court of Queensland
    4. Supreme Court of Western Australia
    5. Supreme Court of South Australia
    6. Supreme Court of Tasmania
    7. Supreme Court of the Northern Territory
  27. Members of State Legislatures in order of state populations:
    1. New South Wales Legislative Assembly and Legislative Council
    2. Victorian Legislative Assembly and Legislative Council
    3. Queensland Legislative Assembly
    4. Western Australian Legislative Assembly and Legislative Council
    5. South Australian House of Assembly and Legislative Council
    6. Tasmanian House of Assembly and Legislative Council
    7. Northern Territory Legislative Assembly
  28. The Secretaries of Departments of the Australian Public Service and their peers and the Chiefs of the Air Force, Army, and Navy and Vice Chief of the Defence Force in order of first appointment to this group:
    1. Vice Chief of the Defence Force
    2. Chief of Navy
    3. Chief of Army
    4. Chief of Air Force
  29. Consuls-General, Consuls and Vice-Consuls according to the date on which recognition was granted
  30. Members of the Australian Capital Territory Legislative Assembly
  31. Recipients of Decorations or Honours from the Sovereign
  32. Citizens of the Commonwealth of Australia

The Alberta order of precedence is a nominal and symbolic hierarchy of important positions within the province of Alberta. It has no legal standing but is used to dictate ceremonial protocol at events of a provincial nature.

  1. Queen of Canada in Right of Alberta: Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II
  2. Lieutenant Governor of Alberta: The Honourable Lois Mitchell
  3. Premier of Alberta: The Honourable Jason Kenney
  4. The Chief Justice of The Court of Appeal of Alberta: The Honourable Justice Catherine Fraser
  5. Former Lieutenant Governors of Alberta
    1. The Honourable Donald Ethell
  6. Former Premiers of Alberta
    1. Ed Stelmach
    2. Alison Redford
    3. Dave Hancock
    4. Rachel Notley
  7. Speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta: Nathan Cooper
  8. Ambassadors and High Commissioners accredited to Canada
  9. Members of the Executive Council of Alberta, in relative order of precedence as determined by the Premier
    1. The Honourable Sarah Hoffman, Deputy Premier & Minister of Health
    2. The Honourable Brian Mason, Minister of Infrastructure & Transportation & House Leader
    3. The Honourable David Eggen, Minister of Education
    4. The Honourable Deron Bilous, Minister of Economic Development and Trade
    5. The Honourable Joe Ceci, Minister of Finance, President of the Treasury Board
    6. The Honourable Kathleen Ganley, Minister of Justice and Solicitor General
    7. The Honourable Shannon Phillips, Minister of Environment and Parks & Climate Change Office
    8. The Honourable Oneil Carlier, Minister of Agriculture and Forestry
    9. The Honourable Danielle Larivee, Minister of Municipal Affairs
    10. The Honourable Marg McCuaig-Boyd, Minister of Energy
    11. The Honourable Irfan Sabir, Minister of Human Services
    12. The Honourable Lori Sigurdson, Minister of Seniors and Housing
    13. The Honourable Richard Feehan, Minister of Indigenous Relations
    14. The Honourable Christina Gray, Minister of Labour & Democratic Renewal
    15. The Honourable Stephanie McLean, Minister of Service Alberta & Status of Women
    16. The Honourable Ricardo Miranda, Minister of Culture and Tourism
    17. The Honourable Marlin Schmidt, Minister of Advanced Education
    18. The Honourable Brandy Payne, Associate Minister of Health
  10. Leader of the Official Opposition: Rachel Notley
  11. Current members of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada resident in Alberta
    1. Members of the Canadian Cabinet
      1. The Honourable Amarjeet Sohi, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities
      2. The Honourable Kent Hehr, Minister of Veterans Affairs and Associate Minister of National Defence
    2. Members not in Cabinet
      1. Helena Guergis PC
  12. Members of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta with precedence governed by the date of their first election to the Legislature
  13. Members of the Senate of Canada, who represent Alberta by date of appointment
    1. The Honourable Elaine McCoy
    2. The Honourable Grant Mitchell
    3. The Honourable Claudette Tardif
    4. The Honourable Betty Unger
    5. The Honourable Doug Black
    6. The Honourable Scott Tannas
  14. Members of the House of Commons of Canada who represent Alberta constituencies by date of election
  15. Superior court justices
    1. Chief Justice of the Court of Queen's Bench of Alberta: The Honourable Justice M.T. Moreau
    2. Justices of the Court of Appeal of Alberta
    3. Justices of the Court of Queen's Bench of Alberta
  16. Heads of religious denominations
  17. Heads of Consular Posts: Consuls-General; Consuls; Vice-Consuls; Consular Agents
  18. Judges of the Provincial Court of Alberta
    1. Chief Judge of the Provincial Court of Alberta
    2. Other judges by seniority of appointment
  19. Mayors of Alberta municipalities
  20. Aboriginal Leaders
    1. Chiefs of the Treaty First Nations in Alberta, in order of seniority of election to office;
    2. President of Métis Settlements General Council
    3. President of Métis Nation of Alberta: Audrey Poitras
  21. Deputy Minister to the Premier and Cabinet Secretary
  22. Clerk of the Legislative Assembly
  23. Ombudsman
  24. Provincial Auditor
  25. Chief Electoral Officer: Glen Resler
  26. Ethics Commissioner: Neil R. Wilkinson
  27. Information and Privacy Commissioner: Jill Clayton
  28. Deputy Ministers
  29. Senior Alberta government officials with rank of Deputy Minister as determined by the Executive Council
  30. Chief Executive Officers of Crown Corporations
  31. Leadership of Alberta universities
    1. Chancellor of the University of Alberta: Ralph B. Young
    2. Chancellor of the University of Calgary: Jim Dinning
    3. Chancellor of the University of Lethbridge: Shirley McClellan
    4. Chairman of the Board, University of Alberta
    5. Chairman of the Board, University of Calgary
    6. Chairman of the Board, University of Lethbridge
    7. Chairman of the Board, Athabasca University
    8. Chairman of the Board, Mount Royal University
    9. Chairman of the Board, MacEwan University
    10. President of the University of Alberta: David H. Turpin
    11. President of the University of Calgary: Ed McCauley
    12. President of the University of Lethbridge: Michael J. Mahon
    13. President of Athabasca University: Frits Pannekoek
    14. President of Mount Royal University: David Docherty
    15. President of Grant MacEwan University: David W. Atkinson
  32. Police and military
    1. Commanding Officer, "K" Division, Royal Canadian Mounted Police: Dale McGowan
    2. Commander, 3rd Canadian Division: Brigadier-General J.C.G. Juneau
    3. Commanding Officer, HMCS Nonsuch
    4. Commanding Officer, 1 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group
    5. Commanding Officer, 1 Area Support Group
    6. Commanding Officer, 41 Canadian Brigade Group
    7. Commanding Officer, 4 Wing

Sir Peter Blanchard is a former Judge of the Supreme Court of New Zealand.

The prefix The Honourable or The Honorable is an honorific style that is used before the names of certain classes of people.

References

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  2. "Parliament.uk". parliament.uk. Archived from the original on 23 April 2010. Retrieved 1 May 2018.
  3. A use in the Commons in 1898 Archived 6 May 2014 at the Wayback Machine Hansard. HL Deb 2 May 1898 vol 57 c43 Retrieved 6 May 2014
  4. A use by either House of Parliament in 2005 Archived 22 December 2012 at the Wayback Machine Hansard. HL Deb 14 March 2005 vol 670 cc399-468GC Retrieved 30 March 2013
  5. "Mental Capacity Bill". Archived from the original on 26 December 2012.
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  7. 'The Prefix "The"'. In Titles and Forms of Address, 21st ed., pp. 8–9. A & C Black, London, 2002.
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  11. "Right Honourable". TheyWorkForYou. Archived from the original on 6 September 2017.
  12. "Reception by the Right Hon. the LORD MAYOR OF LEEDS and LADY MAYORESS (Mr. and Mrs. HUGH LUPTON) to the B.N.O.C. on the occasion of their visit to the Theatre Royal, Leeds - 2LS Leeds, 6 November 1927". Copyright © 2016 BBC - Radio Times 1923-2009. Archived from the original on 9 March 2016. Retrieved 9 March 2016.
  13. The Title of Lord Mayor – Use of the Prefix "Right Honourable", in The Times , 7 July 1932, p. 16
  14. "Lord Mayor of Bristol". Bristol City Council. Archived from the original on 21 March 2009. Retrieved 26 December 2008.
  15. "Royal Guests of L.C.C. The Queen At The County Hall, Honour For Chairman". The Times . 1 June 1935. p. 16.
  16. "No. 43613". The London Gazette . 30 March 1965. p. 3195.
  17. Kidd, Charles, Debrett's Peerage & Baronetage 2015 Edition, London, 2015, Forms of Addressing Persons of Title, pp.56-60, p.60
  18. Debrett's recommends the use of the post-nominal letters "PC" in a social style of address for a peer who is a Privy Counsellor. "Privy Counsellors and Crown Appointments". Debrett’s. Archived from the original on 28 May 2016. Retrieved 15 June 2015.
  19. "Privy counsellors". Debretts. Archived from the original on 30 June 2015. Retrieved 24 May 2015.
  20. ' Privy Counsellors'. In Titles and Forms of Address, 21st ed., pp. 72–73. A & C Black, London, 2002.
  21. Yamashita, Kate (12 March 2014). "Lord Mayor Graham Quirk". www.brisbane.qld.gov.au. Archived from the original on 18 April 2017. Retrieved 17 April 2017.
  22. D.S. Senanayake – A nation’s father, undisputed leader of all time
  23. 1 2 ""The Right Honourable"". www.dpmc.govt.nz. Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. Archived from the original on 8 April 2017. Retrieved 30 April 2017.
  24. "The Privy Council". Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. Archived from the original on 14 June 2009. Retrieved 16 June 2009.
  25. "Honours Q and A" (PDF). 2009. Archived (PDF) from the original on 3 June 2011. Retrieved 29 June 2009.
  26. "Use of the title 'The Right Honourable' in New Zealand, 2 August 2010". The Queen's Printer. 2 August 2010. Archived from the original on 5 August 2010. Retrieved 3 August 2010.
  27. This did not apply to former Governor-Generals Sir Paul Reeves, Dame Catherine Tizard and Dame Silvia Cartwright and former Speakers Sir Kerry Burke, Sir Robin Gray, Sir Peter Tapsell, Sir Doug Kidd and Margaret Wilson