Paul Martin

Last updated

ISBN 0771056923), in late 2008. The book, published by McClelland & Stewart, draws heavily upon interviews conducted by Sean Conway, a former Ontario Liberal provincial cabinet minister, which were carried out for the Library and Archives Canada.

Martin was asked by Kofi Annan (at that time Secretary General of the United Nations), Gordon Brown (then Prime Minister of the United Kingdom), and other international politicians and diplomats to help African countries develop their economic potential. [59]

In 2009, Martin was co-chair of the Congo Basin Forest Fund, along with Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Professor Wangari Maathai, to address global warming and poverty issues in a ten-nation region in Africa. [59]

In September 2022, Martin attended Elizabeth II's state funeral, along with other former Canadian prime ministers. [60]

Since his retirement from active Canadian politics, Martin has been an adviser to the International Monetary Fund, and to the Coalition for Dialogue on Africa. He also works with the Martin Family Initiative, which assists First Nations youth. [61] He lives in Knowlton Québec and is an enthusiastic member of the Brome Lake Golf club.

Honours

Order of Canada (CC) ribbon bar.svg
Canada125 ribbon.png QEII Golden Jubilee Medal ribbon.png QEII Diamond Jubilee Medal ribbon.svg

Paul Martin
PC CC KC
Paul Martin in 2011 crop.jpg
Martin in 2011
21st Prime Minister of Canada
In office
December 12, 2003 February 6, 2006
RibbonDescriptionNotes
Order of Canada (CC) ribbon bar.svg Companion of the Order of Canada (C.C.)
  • Awarded on November 3, 2011;
  • Invested on May 25, 2012 [62]
Canada125 ribbon.png 125th Anniversary of the Confederation of Canada Medal
QEII Golden Jubilee Medal ribbon.png Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee Medal for Canada
QEII Diamond Jubilee Medal ribbon.svg Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal for Canada
Coat of arms of Paul Martin
Martin Escutcheon.png
Crest
A demi-lion Or holding in its dexter paw a spray of shamrock, thistle and lily Azure and resting its sinister paw on a closed book proper bound Gules;
Escutcheon
Per saltire Gules and Argent the mark of the Prime Ministership of Canada (four maple leaves conjoined in cross) within an orle of hands wrists inward, all counterchanged;
Supporters
Two Siberian tigers proper winged in the style of the Pacific Coast First Nations Sable embellished Argent and Gules, each gorged with a collar of cedar branches Or pendent therefrom a bezant charged with a ship’s wheel Azure and standing on the deck of a ship Gules rising above barry wavy Argent and Azure;
Motto
PRIMUM PATRIA ET FAMILIA (Country And Family First) [65]

The CSL vessel Rt. Hon. Paul E. Martin is named for him.

Honorary degrees

LocationDateSchoolDegree
Flag of Quebec.svg QuebecNovember 1998 Concordia University Doctor of Laws (LL.D) [66]
Flag of Ontario.svg OntarioJune 2001 Wilfrid Laurier University Doctor of Laws (LL.D) [67]
Flag of Ontario.svg Ontario14 June 2007 University of Windsor Doctor of Laws (LL.D) [68]
Flag of Quebec.svg Quebec30 May 2009 Bishop's University Doctor of Civil Law (DCL)
Flag of Ontario.svg Ontario28 May 2010 Queen's University Doctor of Laws (LL.D) [69]
Flag of Ontario.svg Ontario18 June 2010 University of Western Ontario Doctor of Laws (LL.D) [70]
Flag of Ontario.svg Ontario3 June 2011 University of Toronto Doctor of Laws (LL.D) [71]
Flag of Ontario.svg Ontario16 June 2011 McMaster University Doctor of Laws (LL.D) [72]
Flag of Ontario.svg Ontario13 June 2012 Nipissing University Doctor of Education (D.Ed.) [73]
Flag of British Columbia.svg British ColumbiaFall 2012 University of British Columbia Doctor of Laws (LL.D) [74] [75]
Flag of Ontario.svg Ontario1 June 2013 Lakehead University Doctor of Laws [76]
Flag of Ontario.svg Ontario2013 University of Ottawa [77]
Flag of New Brunswick.svg New Brunswick2013 University of New Brunswick Doctor of Laws (LL.D) [78]
Flag of Israel.svg Israel2013 University of Haifa Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)
Flag of New Brunswick.svg New Brunswick2014 Mount Allison University Doctor of Laws (LL.D) [79]
Flag of Nova Scotia.svg Nova ScotiaOctober 2014 Dalhousie University Doctor of Laws (LL.D) [80]
Flag of Manitoba.svg Manitoba27 May 2016 Brandon University Doctor of Laws (LL.D) [81]
Flag of Quebec.svg Quebec7 June 2017 McGill University Doctor of Laws (LL.D) [82] [83]
Flag of Ontario.svg Ontario9 June 2017 Trent University Doctor of Laws (LL.D) [84] [85]
Flag of Ontario.svg Ontario14 June 2019 Carleton University Doctor of Laws (LL.D) [86] [87] [88]
Flag of Alberta.svg Alberta19 October 2019 University of Lethbridge Doctor of Laws (LL.D) [89] [90]
Flag of Ontario.svg Ontario19 June 2020 Brock University Doctor of Laws (LL.D) [91]

Electoral record

See also

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Further reading

Archives

Bibliography

  • Gray, John. Paul Martin, 2003.
  • Jeffrey, Brooke. Divided Loyalties: The Liberal Party of Canada, 1984 – 2008 (University of Toronto Press. 2010)
  • Wilson-Smith, Anthony; Greenspon, Edward (1996). Double Vision: The Inside Story of the Liberals in Power. Doubleday Canada. ISBN   0-385-25613-2.
Party political offices
Preceded by Leader of the Liberal Party
2003–2006
Succeeded by
John Manley
Acting
Political offices
Preceded by Minister of Finance
1993–2002
Succeeded by
Preceded by Prime Minister of Canada
2003–2006
Succeeded by
Order of precedence
Preceded byas Former Prime Minister Canadian order of precedence
as Former Prime Minister
Succeeded byas Former Prime Minister