Marquess of Bath

Last updated

Marquessate of Bath
Coronet of a British Marquess.svg
Bath, marquess of.svg
Arms: Quarterly: 1st and 4th, Barry of ten Or and Sable (Botteville); 2nd and 3rd, Argent, a Lion rampant with tail nowed and erect Gules (Thynne). Crest: A Reindeer statant Or. Supporters: Dexter: A Reindeer Or, gorged with a plain Collar Sable. Sinister: A Lion with tail nowed and erect Gules. [1]
Creation date18 August 1789
Monarch King George III
Peerage Peerage of Great Britain
First holder Thomas Thynne, 1st Marquess of Bath
Present holder Alexander Thynn, 7th Marquess of Bath
Heir apparent Ceawlin, Viscount Weymouth
Remainder toThe 1st Marquess' heirs male of the body lawfully begotten
Subsidiary titles
  • Viscount Weymouth
  • Baron Thynne
  • Baronet 'of Caus Castle'
StatusExtant
Seat(s) Longleat
MottoJ'AY BONNE CAUSE
(I have good reason)

Marquess of Bath is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1789 for Thomas Thynne, Viscount Weymouth. The Marquess holds the subsidiary titles Baron Thynne, of Warminster in the County of Wiltshire, and Viscount Weymouth, both created in 1682 in the Peerage of England. He is also a baronet in the Baronetage of England.

The Peerage of Great Britain comprises all extant peerages created in the Kingdom of Great Britain after the Acts of Union 1707 but before the Acts of Union 1800. It replaced the Peerage of England and the Peerage of Scotland until it was itself replaced by the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1801.

Thomas Thynne, 1st Marquess of Bath 18th-century English noble

Thomas Thynne, 1st Marquess of Bath, KG, PC, of Longleat in Wiltshire, was a British politician who held office under King George III. He served as Southern Secretary, Northern Secretary and Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. Between 1751 and 1789, he was known as the 3rd Viscount Weymouth. He is possibly best known for his role in the Falklands Crisis of 1770.

Wiltshire County of England

Wiltshire is a county in South West England with an area of 3,485 km2. It is landlocked and borders the counties of Dorset, Somerset, Hampshire, Gloucestershire, Oxfordshire and Berkshire. The county town was originally Wilton, after which the county is named, but Wiltshire Council is now based in the county town of Trowbridge. Within the county's boundary are two unitary authority areas, Wiltshire and Swindon, governed respectively by Wiltshire Council and Swindon Borough Council.

Contents

Family history until 1800

Sir John Thynne Sir John Thynne 1566.jpg
Sir John Thynne

The Thynne family descends from the soldier and courtier Sir John Thynne (died 1580), who constructed Longleat House between 1567 and 1579. In 1641 his great-grandson Henry Frederick Thynne was created a Baronet, of Caus Castle, in the Baronetage of England (some sources claim that the territorial designation is "Kempsford in the County of Gloucester"). He was succeeded by his son, the second Baronet. He represented Oxford University and Tamworth in the House of Commons and also served as Envoy to Sweden. In 1682 he was raised to the Peerage of England as Baron Thynne, of Warminster in the County of Wilts, and Viscount Weymouth, in the County of Dorset, with remainder to his younger brothers James Thynne (who died unmarried) and Henry Frederick Thynne and the heirs male of their bodies. [2]

John Thynne English Member of Parliament, died 1580

Sir John Thynne was the steward to Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset and a member of parliament. He was the builder of Longleat House and his descendants became Marquesses of Bath.

Caus Castle 12th-century castle in England built within an Iron Age hillfort

Caus Castle is a ruin of a hill fort and medieval castle in the civil parish of Westbury in the English county of Shropshire. It is situated up on the eastern foothills of the Long Mountain guarding the route from Shrewsbury, Shropshire to Montgomery, Powys on the border between England and Wales. It was destroyed during the English Civil War and has been in ruins since.

In the United Kingdom, a territorial designation follows modern peerage titles, linking them to a specific place or places. It is also an integral part of all baronetcies. Within Scotland, a territorial designation proclaims a relationship with a particular area of land.

Lord Weymouth died without surviving male issue in 1714 (one of his three sons, the Honourable Henry Thynne, represented Weymouth and Melcombe Regis and Tamworth in Parliament but had died in 1708, leaving only daughters) and was succeeded in the peerages (according to the special remainders) by his great-nephew, the second Viscount. He was the grandson of the aforementioned Henry Frederick Thynne, brother of the first Viscount. He married as his second wife Lady Louisa Carteret, daughter of John, Earl Granville, a female-line grandson of John, Earl of Bath (a title which had become extinct in 1711). Lord Weymouth was succeeded by his eldest son, the third Viscount. He was a prominent statesman and served as Secretary of State for the Northern Department and as Secretary of State for the Southern Department. In 1789 the Bath title held by his ancestors was revived when he was created Marquess of Bath. [3]

Henry Thynne (1675–1708) British politician

Henry Thynne was an English Tory politician who sat in the English and British House of Commons from 1701 to 1708.

Weymouth and Melcombe Regis was a parliamentary borough in Dorset represented in the English House of Commons, later in that of Great Britain, and finally in the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It was formed by an Act of Parliament of 1570 which amalgamated the existing boroughs of Weymouth and Melcombe Regis. Until 1832, the combined borough continued to elect the four Members of Parliament (MPs) to which its constituent parts had previously been entitled; the Great Reform Act reduced its representation to two Members, and the constituency was abolished altogether in 1885, becoming part of the new South Dorset constituency.

Tamworth (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1997 onwards

Tamworth is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2010 by Christopher Pincher, a Conservative.

Family history 1800-present

His son, the second Marquess, sat as Tory Member of Parliament for Weobley and Bath and served as Lord-Lieutenant of Somerset. His eldest son Thomas Thynne, Viscount Weymouth, represented Weobly in Parliament but predeceased his father by two months. Lord Bath was therefore succeeded by his second son, the third Marquess, who died three months later. He was a Captain in the Royal Navy and also sat as Member of Parliament for Weobly. His son, the fourth Marquess, succeeded at age six; he was Chairman of the Wiltshire County Council and Lord-Lieutenant of Wiltshire. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the fifth Marquess. He was a Conservative politician and served briefly as Under-Secretary of State for India in 1895. His second but eldest surviving son, the sixth Marquess, represented Frome in the House of Commons as a Conservative. The titles are currently held by the latter's second but eldest surviving son, the seventh Marquess, who succeeded in 1992. He is a well-known politician, author and artist. In 2015 the Times described him as "a steaming pile of ancient kaftans and one of our wuffliest and weirdest mad-hatter aristocrats. He is best known for swanning around Longleat, his enormous Elizabethan pad in Wiltshire, entertaining his 75 concubines, or as he calls them, “wifelets”. The wifelets have included former Bond girls and Sri Lankan teenagers, as well as housewives and, according to some,[] prostitutes. The deal is simple: the wifelets get to hang out with Lord Bath in a jewel of a palace and in return he gets unlimited sex." [4]

Tory A conservative political philosophy

A Tory is a person who holds a political philosophy known as Toryism, based on a British version of traditionalism and conservatism, which upholds the supremacy of social order as it has evolved in the English culture throughout history. The Tory ethos has been summed up with the phrase "God, Queen, and Country". Tories generally advocate monarchism, and were historically of a high church Anglican religious heritage, opposed to the liberalism of the Whig faction.

Weobley was a parliamentary borough in Herefordshire, which elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons in 1295 and from 1628 until 1832, when the borough was abolished by the Great Reform Act.

Bath (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom

Bath is a constituency in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

Other family members

Longleat House, the seat of the Thynnes Longleat House from the south east - geograph.org.uk - 838836.jpg
Longleat House, the seat of the Thynnes

The Honourable Henry Thynne, second son of the second Viscount, succeeded to the Carteret estates through his mother and assumed the surname of Carteret in lieu of Thynne. In 1784 he was created Baron Carteret with remainder to the younger sons of his brother the first Marquess of Bath (see the Baron Carteret for more information on this title). Several other members of the Thynne family have also gained distinction. The Reverend Lord John Thynne, third son of the second Marquess, was sub-Dean of Westminster Abbey; his seventh son was Major-General Sir Reginald Thomas Thynne (1843–1926). Lord Henry Thynne, second son of the third Marquess, was a Conservative politician and notably served as Treasurer of the Household from 1875 to 1880. Lord Alexander Thynne, third son of the fourth Marquess, represented Bath in the House of Commons from 1910 to 1918.

Henry Carteret, 1st Baron Carteret British politician and Baron

Henry Frederick Carteret, 1st Baron Carteret PC (1735–1826), of Haynes, Bedfordshire, was Member of Parliament for Staffordshire (1757–1761), for Weobley in Herefordshire (1761–1770) and was Master of the Household to King George III 1768–1771. He was hereditary Bailiff of Jersey 1776–1826.

Baron Carteret

Baron Carteret is a title that has been created twice in British history, once in the Peerage of England and once in the Peerage of Great Britain. The first creation came into the Peerage of England in 1681 when the fourteen-year-old Sir George Carteret, 2nd Baronet, was made Baron Carteret, of Hawnes in the County of Bedford. The peerage was originally proposed for his grandfather Sir George Carteret, 1st Baronet, a celebrated royalist statesman, but he died before he was granted the title and as his eldest son, Philip, predeceased him, it was eventually bestowed on his grandson, George, with remainder to the latter's brothers. The Baronetcy, of Metesches in the Island of Jersey, had been created for George Carteret in the Baronetage of England on 9 May 1645. Lord Carteret married Lady Grace Granville, daughter of John Granville, 1st Earl of Bath. In 1715 Lady Grace was raised to the Peerage of Great Britain in her own right as Viscountess Carteret and Countess Granville. Lord Carteret and Lady Granville were both succeeded by their son John Carteret, the second Baron and second Earl. The titles became extinct on the death of the latter's son Robert Carteret, the third Earl, in 1776.

Lord John Thynne

Rev. Lord John Thynne was an Anglican cleric, who served for 45 years as Deputy Dean of Westminster.

The family seat is Longleat House.

Coat of arms

The arms borne by the Thynne family are: Quarterly: 1st and 4th, barry of ten Or and Sable (Botteville); 2nd and 3rd, Argent, a lion rampant with tail nowed and erected Gules (Thynne). [1] This can be translated as: a shield divided into quarters, the top left and bottom right made of ten horizontal bars alternating gold and black (for the Boteville family); the top right and bottom left quarters white with a red lion rampant with a knotted tail (for the Thynne family).

Early Thynnes of Longleat

Thynne Baronets, of Cause Castle (1641)

Viscounts Weymouth (1682)

Marquesses of Bath (1789)

Thomas Thynne, 1st Marquess of Bath. MarqBath.jpg
Thomas Thynne, 1st Marquess of Bath.

The heir apparent is the present holder's son Ceawlin Henry Laszlo Thynn, Viscount Weymouth (b. 1974)
The heir apparent's heir apparent is his son The Hon. John Alexander Ladi Thynn (b. 2014)

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 Montague-Smith, P. W. (ed.), Debrett's Peerage, Baronetage, Knightage and Companionage, Kelly's Directories Ltd, Kingston-upon-Thames, 1968, p. 119
  2. "No. 1778". The London Gazette . 4 December 1682. p. 2.
  3. "No. 13123". The London Gazette . 18 August 1789. p. 550.
  4. London Sunday Times 6 Sept 2015
  5. Burke, Sir Bernard, (1938 ed) Burke's Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage. Shaw, London. p. 243
  6. 1 2 3 Woodfall, H. (1768). The Peerage of England; Containing a Genealogical and Historical Account of All the Peers of that Kingdom Etc. Fourth Edition, Carefully Corrected, and Continued to the Present Time, Volume 6. p. 258.
  7. 1 2 Lee, Sidney; Edwards, A. S. G. (revised) (2004). "Thynne, William (d. 1546)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/27426.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  8. Girouard, Mark, Thynne, Sir John (1515–1580), estate manager and builder of Longleat in Oxford Dictionary of Biography (Oxford University Press, 2004)
  9. Booth, Muriel. "Thynne, John (?1550–1604), of Longleat, Wilts". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  10. Lancaster, Henry; Thrush, Andrew. "Thynne, Charles (c.1568–1652), of Cheddar, Som". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  11. Pugh, R. B.; Crittall, Elizabeth, eds. (1957). "Parliamentary history: 1529–1629". A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 5. British History Online. London: Victoria County History.
  12. Ferris, John P. "Thynne, Sir James (c.1605-70), of Longbridge Deverill, Wilts". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  13. Helms, M. W.; Ferris, John P. "Thynne, Sir Thomas (c.1610–c.69), of Richmond, Surr". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  14. Marshall, Alan (2008) [2004]. "Thynne, Thomas [nicknamed Tom of Ten Thousand] (1647/8–1682)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/27423.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  15. Heath-Caldwell, J. J. "Thomas Thynne, 1st Marquess of Bath, 3rd Viscount Weymouth". JJ Heath-Caldwell. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  16. Hayton, D. W. "Thynne, Hon. Henry (1675-1708)". The History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  17. Dunaway, Stewart (2013). Lord John Carteret, Earl Granville: His Life History and the Granville Grants. Lulu. p. 33. ISBN   9781300878070.
  18. "Bath, Thomas Thynne". Encyclopedia Britannica 1911. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  19. Thorne, Roland. "Carteret [formerly Thynne], Henry Frederick". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  20. "Thomas Thynne, 2nd Marquess of Bath (1765–1837)". National Portrait Gallery. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  21. Escott, Margaret. "Thynne, Lord Henry Frederick (1797-1837), of 6 Grovesnor Square, Mdx". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  22. "John Thynne, 4th Marquess of Bath (1831-1896), Diplomat and landowner". National Portrait Gallery. Retrieved 2 January 2016.

Related Research Articles

Longleat stately home in Wiltshire, England, UK

Longleat is an English stately home and the seat of the Marquesses of Bath. It is a leading and early example of the Elizabethan prodigy house. It is adjacent to the village of Horningsham and near the towns of Warminster and Westbury in Wiltshire and Frome in Somerset. It is noted for its Elizabethan country house, maze, landscaped parkland and safari park. The house is set in 1,000 acres (400 ha) of parkland landscaped by Capability Brown, with 4,000 acres (1,600 ha) of let farmland and 4,000 acres (1,600 ha) of woodland, which includes a Center Parcs holiday village. It was the first stately home to open to the public, and the Longleat estate includes the first safari park outside Africa.

Henry Thynne, 6th Marquess of Bath British politician

Henry Frederick Thynne, 6th Marquess of Bath, JP, styled Lord Henry Thynne until 1916 and Viscount Weymouth between 1916 and 1946, was a British aristocrat, landowner, and Conservative Party politician.

Thomas Thynne, 5th Marquess of Bath politician

Thomas Henry Thynne, 5th Marquess of Bath, styled Viscount Weymouth until 1896, was a British landowner and Conservative politician. He held ministerial office as Under-Secretary of State for India in 1905 and Master of the Horse between 1922 and 1924. He was also involved in local politics and served as Chairman of Wiltshire County Council between 1906 and his death in 1946.

John Thynne, 4th Marquess of Bath British diplomat

John Alexander Thynne, 4th Marquess of Bath, styled Viscount Weymouth between March and June 1837, was a British peer and a diplomat for almost sixty years.

Henry Thynne, 3rd Marquess of Bath British naval commander and politician

Henry Frederick Thynne, 3rd Marquess of Bath, styled Lord Henry Thynne until January 1837 and Viscount Weymouth between January and March 1837, was a British naval commander and politician.

Thomas Thynne, 2nd Marquess of Bath British politician

Thomas Thynne, 2nd Marquess of Bath KG, styled Viscount Weymouth from 1789 until 1796, was a British peer.

Lord Henry Thynne British politician

Lord Henry Frederick Thynne PC, DL was a British Conservative politician. He served under Benjamin Disraeli as Treasurer of the Household between 1875 and 1880.

Thomas Thynne, 1st Viscount Weymouth English politician and Viscount

Thomas Thynne, 1st Viscount Weymouth was a British peer in the peerage of England.

Thomas Thynne (died 1682) landowner

Thomas Thynne was an English landowner of the family that is now headed by the Marquess of Bath and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1670 to 1682. He went by the nickname "Tom of Ten Thousand" due to his great wealth. He was a friend of the Duke of Monmouth, a relationship referred to in John Dryden's satirical work Absalom and Achitophel where Thynne is described as "Issachar, his wealthy western friend".

Thomas Thynne, 2nd Viscount Weymouth English Viscount

Thomas Thynne, 2nd Viscount Weymouth of Longleat House in Wiltshire was an English peer, descended from Sir John Thynne (c.1515-1580) builder of Longleat.

John Thynne, 3rd Baron Carteret PC, known as Lord John Thynne between 1789 and 1838, was a British peer and politician.

George Thynne, 2nd Baron Carteret PC, styled Lord George Thynne between 1789 and 1826, was a British Tory politician.

James Thynne politician from England

Sir James Thynne was an English landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons in two periods between 1640 and 1670.

Thomas Thynne (died 1639) Member of Parliament

Sir Thomas Thynne, of Longleat, Wiltshire, was an English landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1601 and 1629.

Sir Thomas Thynne was an English lawyer and politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1660.

Charles Thynne was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1614 and 1629.

John Thynne (died 1604) English landowner and politician, died 1604

Sir John Thynne of Longleat House, Wiltshire, was an English landowner and Member of Parliament.

References