Secretary of State for the Northern Department

Last updated
Great Britain
Office of the Secretary of State for the Northern Department
Coat of Arms of Great Britain (1714-1801).svg
Coat of Arms of the Kingdom of Great Britain Government
The Northern Department
Style The Right Honourable
(Formal prefix)
Member of British Cabinet
Seat Westminster, London
AppointerThe British Monarch
on advice of the Prime Minister
Term length No fixed term
Formation1660-1782
First holder Sir William Morice
Final holder David Murray, 7th Viscount Stormont

The Secretary of State for the Northern Department was a position in the Cabinet of the government of Great Britain up to 1782, when the Northern Department became the Foreign Office. [1] [2]

Contents

History

Before the Act of Union, 1707, the Secretary of State's responsibilities were in relation to the English government, not the British. Even after the Union, there was still a separate Secretary of State for Scotland until 1746, though the post was sometimes vacant. This continued the previous Scottish government post of Secretary of State.

Before 1782, the responsibilities of the two Secretaries of State for the Northern and the Southern Departments were not divided up in terms of area of authority, but rather geographically. Both were responsible for England and Wales. The Secretary of State for the Northern Department, the more junior of the two, was responsible for foreign relations with the Protestant states of Northern Europe. The more senior Secretary of State for the Southern Department was responsible for relations with the Catholic and Muslim states of Europe. In 1782, the two Secretaries of State were reformed as the Secretary of State for the Home Department and the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs.

During the 18th century, Secretaries of State for the Northern Department, if peers, were often Leaders of the House of Lords as well.

Secretaries of State for the Northern Department, 1660–1782

Included: [3]

PortraitName
Constituency
Term of officeNotes
Jacob Huysmans - Sir William Morice, MP.jpg Sir William Morice
MP for Plymouth
27 May
1660
29 September
1668
No image.svg Sir John Trevor
MP for Arundel until 1661
MP for Great Bedwyn after 1661
29 September
1668
8 July
1672
No image.svg Henry Coventry
MP for Droitwich
3 July
1672
11 September
1674
SirJosephWilliamson.jpg Sir Joseph Williamson
MP for Thetford
11 September
1674
20 February
1679
2nd Earl of Sunderland.jpg Robert Spencer
The Earl of Sunderland
10 February
1679
26 April
1680
Sir Leoline Jenkins by Herbert Tuer.jpg Sir Leoline Jenkins
MP for Oxford University
26 April
1680
2 February
1681
No image.svg Edward Conway
The Earl of Conway
2 February
1681
January
1683
No image.svg Robert Spencer
The Earl of Sunderland
28 January
1683
1684
Sidney Godolphin, 1st Earl of Godolphin by Sir Godfrey Kneller, Bt.jpg Sidney Godolphin
MP for Helston
17 April
1684
24 August
1684
No image.svg Charles Middleton
The Earl of Middleton

MP for Winchelsea after 1685
24 August
1684
28 October
1688
No image.svg Richard Graham
The Viscount Preston

MP for Cumberland
29 October
1688
2 December
1688
Daniel Finch, 2nd Earl of Nottingham and 7th Earl of Winchilsea by Jonathan Richardson.jpg Daniel Finch
The Earl of Nottingham
5 March
1689
26 December
1690
Earl of Romney.jpg Henry Sydney
The Viscount Sydney
26 December
1690
3 March
1692
No image.svg Sir John Trenchard
MP for Poole
23 March
1693
2 March
1694
Charles Talbot, 1st Duke of Shrewsbury by Sir Godfrey Kneller, Bt.jpg Charles Talbot
The Duke of Shrewsbury
2 March
1694
3 May
1695
Sir William Trumbull.jpg Sir William Trumbull
MP for Oxford University
3 May
1695
2 December
1697
James Vernon by Sir Godfrey Kneller, Bt (2).jpg James Vernon
MP for Penryn until 1699
MP for Westminster after 1699
2 December
1697
5 November
1700
No image.svg Sir Charles Hedges
MP for Malmesbury
5 November
1700
29 December
1701
James Vernon by Sir Godfrey Kneller, Bt (2).jpg James Vernon
MP for Westminster
4 January
1702
1 May
1702
No image.svg Sir Charles Hedges
MP for Malmesbury until 1702
MP for Calne after 1702
2 May
1702
18 May
1704
RobertHarley1710.jpg Robert Harley
MP for Radnor
16 May
1704
13 February
1708
Henry Boyle Lord Carleton by Godfrey Kneller.jpg Henry Boyle
MP for Westminster
13 February
1708
21 September
1710
Henry St John, 1st Viscount Bolingbroke (1678-1751).jpg Henry St John
The Viscount Bolingbroke

MP for Berkshire until 1712
Viscount Bolingbroke after 1712
21 September
1710
17 August
1713
WilliamBromleySpeaker.jpg Sir William Bromley
MP for Oxford University
17 August
1713
17 September
1714
Charles Townshend, 2nd Viscount Townshend by Sir Godfrey Kneller, Bt (2).jpg Charles Townshend
The Viscount Townshend
17 September
1714
12 December
1716
James Stanhope, 1st Earl Stanhope by Sir Godfrey Kneller, Bt.jpg James Stanhope 12 December
1716
12 April
1717
Charles Spencer 3rd Earl of Sunderland.jpg Charles Spencer
The Earl of Sunderland
12 April
1717
2 March
1718
James Stanhope, 1st Earl Stanhope by Sir Godfrey Kneller, Bt.jpg James Stanhope
The Earl Stanhope
19 March
1718
4 February
1721
John Carteret, 2nd Earl Granville by William Hoare.jpg John Carteret
The Lord Carteret
5 February
1721
21 February
1721
Charles Townshend, 2nd Viscount Townshend by Sir Godfrey Kneller, Bt (2).jpg Charles Townshend
2nd Viscount Townshend
21 February
1721
16 May
1730
William Stanhope, 1st Earl of Harrington (1683-1756), Attributed to Godfrey Kneller.jpg William Stanhope
The Lord Harrington
19 June
1730
12 February
1742
John Carteret, 2nd Earl Granville by William Hoare.jpg John Carteret
The Lord Carteret
12 February
1742
24 November
1744
William Stanhope, 1st Earl of Harrington (1683-1756), Attributed to Godfrey Kneller.jpg William Stanhope
The Earl of Harrington
24 November
1744
January
1746
John Carteret, 2nd Earl Granville by William Hoare.jpg John Carteret
The Earl Granville
12 February
1746
March
1746
as sole Secretary
William Stanhope, 1st Earl of Harrington (1683-1756), Attributed to Godfrey Kneller.jpg William Stanhope
The Earl of Harrington
March
1746
19 October
1746
Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield.PNG Philip Dormer Stanhope
The Earl of Chesterfield
29 October
1746
6 February
1748
1stDukeOfNewcastleOld.jpg Thomas Pelham-Holles
The Duke of Newcastle
6 February
1748
23 March
1754
Robert Darcy, 4th Earl of Holderness.jpg Robert Darcy
The Earl of Holdernesse
April
1757
June
1757
as sole Secretary
John Stuart, Earl of Bute.jpg John Stuart
The Earl of Bute
25 March
1761
27 May
1762
George Grenville (1712-1770) by William Hoare (1707-1792).jpg George Grenville
MP for Buckingham
5 June
1762
9 October
1762
2ndEarlofHalifaxByJoshuaReynoldsNSArtGallery.jpg George Montague-Dunk
The Earl of Halifax
14 October
1762
9 September
1763
John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich.jpg John Montagu
The Earl of Sandwich
9 September
1763
10 July
1765
2ndEarlofHalifaxByJoshuaReynoldsNSArtGallery.jpg George Montague-Dunk
The Earl of Halifax
September
1763
July
1765
Grafton3.JPG Augustus Henry Fitzroy
The Duke of Grafton
12 July
1765
14 May
1766
Field Marshal Conway.jpg Henry Seymour Conway
MP for Thetford
23 May
1766
20 January
1768
MarqBath.jpg Thomas Thynne
The Viscount Weymouth
20 January
1768
21 October
1768
William Nassau.jpg William Nassau de Zuylestein
The Earl of Rochford
21 October
1768
19 December
1770
John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich.jpg John Montagu
The Earl of Sandwich
19 December
1770
12 January
1771
2ndEarlofHalifaxByJoshuaReynoldsNSArtGallery.jpg George Montague-Dunk
The Earl of Halifax
22 January
1771
6 June
1771
Sir Joshua Reynolds - Portrait of Henry Howard.jpg Henry Howard
The Earl of Suffolk
12 June
1771
7 March
1779
No image.svg David Murray
The Viscount Stormont
27 October
1779
27 March
1782

See also

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References

  1. FCO Historians (April 1991). "The FCO: Policy, People and Places (1782-1995)". History Notes (2). Foreign and Commonwealth Office: 1.Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  2. "The National Archives' catalogue: Records assembled by the State Paper Office, including papers of the Secretaries of State up to 1782". The National Archives.
  3. Sainty, J. C. "Lists of appointments British History Online". www.british-history.ac.uk. Originally published by University of London, London, 1973. Retrieved 12 March 2017.

Sources