Poole (UK Parliament constituency)

Last updated

Poole
Borough constituency
for the House of Commons
Poole2007Constituency.svg
Boundary of Poole in Dorset
EnglandDorset.svg
Location of Dorset within England
County Dorset
Electorate 72,773 (December 2010) [1]
Major settlements Poole
Current constituency
Created 1950
Member of Parliament Robert Syms (Conservative)
Number of membersOne
Created from East Dorset
1455–1885
Number of membersTwo (1455–1868), One (1868–1885)
Replaced by East Dorset

Poole is a constituency [n 1] represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 1997 by Robert Syms, a Conservative. [n 2]

Contents

History

The first version of the Poole constituency existed from 1455 until 1885. During this period its exact status was a parliamentary borough, sending two burgesses to Westminster per year, except during its last 17 years when its representation was reduced to one member.

During its abeyance most of Poole was in the East Dorset seat and since its recreation in 1950 its area has been reduced as the harbour town's population has increased.

Boundaries

1950–1983: The Municipal Borough of Poole.

1983–1997: The Borough of Poole wards of Broadstone, Canford Cliffs, Canford Heath, Creekmoor, Hamworthy, Harbour, Newtown, Oakdale, Parkstone, and Penn Hill.

1997–2010: The Borough of Poole wards of Bourne Valley, Canford Cliffs, Hamworthy, Harbour, Newtown, Oakdale, Parkstone, and Penn Hill.

2010–present: The Borough of Poole wards of Branksome West, Canford Cliffs, Creekmoor, Hamworthy East, Hamworthy West, Newtown, Oakdale, Parkstone, Penn Hill, and Poole Town.

Constituency profile

The borough is an economically very diverse borough. In the centre and north are a significant minority of Output Areas which in 2001 had high rankings in the Index of Multiple Deprivation, contributing in 2012 with the remainder to producing for Poole the highest unemployment of the constituencies in the county. [2] [3] However, Canford Cliffs is epitomised by one sub-neighbourhood, Sandbanks with its multimillion-pound properties, the coastline area has been dubbed as "Britain's Palm Beach" by the national media. [4] Alongside oil extraction, insurance, care, retail and customer service industries choosing the town as their base tourism contributes to overall a higher income than the national average, however the divergence is not statistically significant and the size of homes varies extensively. [3] [5]

Members of Parliament

MPs 1455–1629

ParliamentFirst memberSecond member
1510No names known [6]
1512 Richard Phelips Ralph Worsley [6]
1515 Richard Phelips ? [6]
1523?
1529 William Thornhill William Biddlecombe [6]
1536?William Biddlecombe ? [6]
1539?William Biddlecombe ? [6]
1542 Oliver Lawrence John Carew [6]
1545 Oliver Lawrence John Harward [6]
1547 John Hannam John Harward [6]
1553 (Mar) William Newman Thomas White [6]
1553 (Oct) Anthony Dillington John Scryvin
Parliament of 1554 William Wightman Richard Shaw
Parliament of 1554–1555 Anthony Dillington Andrew Hourde
Parliament of 1555 Robert Whitt John Phelips
Parliament of 1558 Thomas Goodwin Thomas Phelips
Parliament of 1559 Walter Haddon Humphrey Mitchel
Parliament of 1563–1567 William Green
Parliament of 1571 George Carleton William Newman
Parliament of 1572–1581 William Green John Hastings
Parliament of 1584–1585 Francis Mills Thomas Vincent
Parliament of 1586–1587 William Fleetwood, junior
Parliament of 1588–1589 Henry Ashley Edward Man
Parliament of 1593 James Orrenge
Parliament of 1597–1598 Roger Mawdeley
Parliament of 1601 Robert Miller Thomas Billet
Parliament of 1604–1611 Thomas Robarts Edward Man
Addled Parliament (1614) Sir Walter Erle Sir Thomas Walsingham, junior
Parliament of 1621–1622 Sir George Horsey
Happy Parliament (1624–1625) Edward Pitt
Useless Parliament (1625) John Pyne Sir John Cooper
Parliament of 1625–1626 Christopher Erle
Parliament of 1628–1629 Sir John Cooper
No Parliament summoned 1629–1640

MPs 1640–1868

YearFirst member [7] First partySecond member [7] Second party
April 1640 John Pyne Parliamentarian William Constantine Royalist
November 1640
September 1642Constantine disabled from sitting – seat vacant
1645 George Skutt
December 1648Skutt excluded in Pride's Purge – seat vacant
1653Poole was unrepresented in the Barebones Parliament
1654 Sir Anthony Ashley Cooper [8] Poole had only one seat in the First and
Second Parliaments of the Protectorate
1656 Edward Boteler
January 1659 Colonel John Fitzjames [9] Samuel Bond
May 1659 John Pyne One seat vacant
April 1660 George Cooper Sir Walter Erle
1661 Sir John Fitzjames (Sir) John Morton [10]
1670 Thomas Trenchard
February 1673 George Cooper
March 1673 Thomas Strangways
1679 Henry Trenchard Thomas Chafin
1685 William Ettrick
1689 Henry Trenchard Sir Nathaniel Napier
1690 Sir John Trenchard Whig
1695 Lord Ashley
1698 William Joliffe Sir William Phippard
1705 Samuel Weston
1708 William Lewen Tory Thomas Ridge [11] Whig
1710 Sir William Phippard
1711 Sir William Lewen Tory
1713 George Trenchard Whig
1722 Thomas Ridge Whig
1727 Denis Bond [12]
1732 Thomas Wyndham Whig
1741 Joseph Gulston Thomas Missing
1747 George Trenchard Whig
1754Colonel Sir Richard Lyttelton [13]
1761Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas Calcraft
1765 Joseph Gulston
1768 Joshua Mauger
1774Major-General Sir Eyre Coote
1780 Joseph Gulston William Morton Pitt
1784 Michael Angelo Taylor
1790Colonel Hon. Charles Stuart [14] Benjamin Lester
1791 Michael Angelo Taylor
1796Colonel Hon. Charles Stuart John Jeffery
1801 George Garland
1808 Sir Richard Bickerton
1809 Benjamin Lester Whig [15]
1812 Michael Angelo Taylor Whig [15]
1818 John Dent Non-partisan [15]
1826 Hon. William Ponsonby Whig [15]
1831 Sir John Byng Whig [15]
January 1835 Charles Augustus Tulk Whig [15]
May 1835 Hon. George Byng Whig [15] [16] [17] [18] [19] [20]
1837 Hon. Charles Ponsonby Whig [15] [20] [21] [22] [18] George Philips Whig [23] [15] [24] [25] [20] [17] [18]
1847 George Richard Robinson Peelite [23]
1850 Henry Danby Seymour Whig
1852 George Woodroffe Franklyn Conservative
1859 Liberal
1865 Charles Waring Liberal
1868 Representation reduced to one Member

MPs 1868–1885

ElectionMember [7] Party
1868 Arthur Guest Conservative
1874 Charles Waring Liberal
May 1874 by-election Hon. Evelyn Ashley Liberal
1880 Charles Schreiber Conservative
1884 by-election William James Harris Conservative
1885 Constituency abolished

MPs since 1950

ElectionMember [7] PartyNotes
1950 Mervyn Wheatley Conservative
1951 Richard Pilkington Conservative
1964 Oscar Murton Conservative Chairman of Ways and Means 1976–79
1979 John Ward Conservative
1997 Sir Robert Syms Conservative

Elections

Elections in the 2010s

General election 2019: Poole [26]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Robert Syms 29,599 58.7 Increase2.svg 0.8
Labour Co-op Sue Aitkenhead10,48320.7Decrease2.svg 8.7
Liberal Democrats Victoria Collins7,81915.5Increase2.svg 6.6
Green Barry Harding-Rathbone [28] 1,7023.4Increase2.svg 0.8
Independent David Young [n 3] 8481.7N/A
Majority19,11638.0Increase2.svg 9.5
Turnout 50,45168.2Increase2.svg 0.7
Conservative hold Swing Increase2.svg 4.8
General election 2017: Poole
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Robert Syms 28,888 57.9 Increase2.svg 7.8
Labour Katie Taylor14,67929.4Increase2.svg 16.6
Liberal Democrats Mike Plummer4,4338.9Decrease2.svg 2.9
Green Adrian Oliver1,2992.6Decrease2.svg 2.0
Demos Direct InitiativeMarty Caine5511.1N/A
Majority14,20928.5Decrease2.svg4.8
Turnout 49,85067.5Increase2.svg 2.2
Conservative hold Swing
General election 2015: Poole [29]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Robert Syms 23,745 50.1 Increase2.svg 2.6
UKIP David Young [30] 7,95616.8Increase2.svg 11.5
Labour Helen Rosser6,10212.9Increase2.svg 0.1
Liberal Democrats Philip Eades5,57211.8Decrease2.svg 19.8
Green Adrian Oliver [31] 2,1984.6Increase2.svg 4.6
Poole People Mark Howell [32] 1,7663.7Increase2.svg 3.7
Independent Ian Northover540.1Decrease2.svg 0.3
Majority15,78933.3Increase2.svg17.4
Turnout 47,39365.3Decrease2.svg 8.1
Conservative hold Swing
General election 2010: Poole [33] [34]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Robert Syms 22,532 47.5 Increase2.svg 4.1
Liberal Democrats Phillip Eades14,99131.6Increase2.svg 2.5
Labour Jason Sanderson6,04112.7Decrease2.svg 10.0
UKIP Nick Wellstead2,5075.3Increase2.svg 1.8
BNP David Holmes1,1882.5Increase2.svg 1.2
Independent Ian Northover1770.4n/a
Majority7,54115.9Increase2.svg1.1
Turnout 47,43673.4Increase2.svg 9.4
Conservative hold Swing Increase2.svg 0.8

Elections in the 2000s

General election 2005: Poole [35]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Robert Syms 17,57143.4−1.7
Liberal Democrats Mike Plummer11,58328.6+3.1
Labour Darren Brown9,37623.1−3.8
UKIP John Barnes1,4363.5+1.0
BNP Peter Pirnie5471.4N/A
Majority5,98814.8-3.4
Turnout 40,51363.1+2.4
Conservative hold Swing −2.4
General election 2001: Poole [36]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Robert Syms 17,71045.1+3.0
Labour David Watt10,54426.9+5.3
Liberal Democrats Nick Westbrook10,01125.5−5.3
UKIP John Bass9682.5+1.4
Majority7,16618.2+6.9
Turnout 39,23360.7−10.3
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1990s

General election 1997: Poole [37]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Robert Syms 19,72642.14
Liberal Democrats Alan Tetlow14,42830.82
Labour Haydn R White10,10021.58
Referendum John Riddington1,9324.13
UKIP Philip Tyler4871.04N/A
Natural Law Jennifer Rosta1370.29
Majority5,29811.32
Turnout 46,81071.00
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1992: Poole [38] [39]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative John Ward 33,44553.2−4.3
Liberal Democrats BR Clements20,61432.8+0.2
Labour Haydn R White6,91211.0+1.1
Ind. Conservative M Steen1,6202.6N/A
Natural Law AL Bailey3030.5N/A
Majority12,83120.4−4.5
Turnout 62,89479.4+1.9
Conservative hold Swing −2.3

Elections in the 1980s

General election 1987: Poole [40]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative John Ward 34,15957.50
SDP Robert Whitley19,35132.57
Labour Michael Shutler5,9019.93
Majority14,80824.92
Turnout 77.49
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1983: Poole [41]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative John Ward 30,35858.31
Liberal B Clements15,92930.60
Labour MV Castle5,59510.75
Servicemen & Citizen AssociationA Foster1770.34
Majority14,42927.72
Turnout 73.60
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1970s

General election 1979: Poole
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative John Ward 38,84657.01
Labour DA Bell15,29122.44
Liberal B Sutton14,00120.55
Majority23,55534.57
Turnout 78.13
Conservative hold Swing
General election October 1974: Poole
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Oscar Murton 28,98246.15
Liberal Geoffrey Goode 17,55727.96
Labour GW Hobbs16,26225.89
Majority11,42518.19
Turnout 75.30
Conservative hold Swing
General election February 1974: Poole
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Oscar Murton 31,15646.04
Liberal Geoffrey Goode 21,08831.16
Labour GW Hobbs15,43422.81
Majority10,06814.88
Turnout 81.88
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1970: Poole
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Oscar Murton 31,10053.11
Labour Ian S Campbell17,61030.07
Liberal Geoffrey Goode 9,84616.81
Majority13,49023.04
Turnout 75.06
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1960s

General election 1966: Poole
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Oscar Murton 25,45147.59
Labour David A Sutton19,63036.71
Liberal Brian S Sherriff8,39415.70
Majority5,82110.89
Turnout 79.00
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1964: Poole
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Oscar Murton 24,44046.26
Labour Henry Toch16,15830.58
Liberal Herbert Charles Richard Ballam12,23423.16
Majority8,28215.68
Turnout 80.05
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1950s

General election 1959: Poole
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Richard Pilkington 26,95652.84
Labour Alan Williams 15,32530.04
Liberal John C Holland8,73517.12
Majority11,63122.80
Turnout 80.27
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1955: Poole
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Richard Pilkington 26,59453.86
Labour Frederick Charles Reeves17,03234.49
Liberal John C Holland5,75011.65
Majority9,56219.37
Turnout 80.94
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1951: Poole
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Richard Pilkington 26,99853.60
Labour Leonard Joseph Matchan18,34636.42
Liberal William Ridgway5,0299.98
Majority8,65217.18
Turnout 84.97
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1950: Poole
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Mervyn Wheatley 24,34449.37
Labour Evelyn King 17,83136.16
Liberal William Ridgway7,13014.46
Majority6,51313.21
Turnout 87.10
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1880s

By-election, 19 Apr 1884: Poole [42]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative William James Harris 877 51.8 +1.6
Liberal Thomas Chatfield Clarke [43] 81548.21.6
Majority623.6+3.2
Turnout 1,69285.33.8
Registered electors 1,983
Conservative hold Swing +1.6
General election 1880: Poole [42]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Charles Schreiber 854 50.2 +5.1
Liberal Charles Waring 84849.85.1
Majority60.4N/A
Turnout 1,70289.1+4.9
Registered electors 1,911
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +5.1

Elections in the 1870s

1874 Poole by-election [42]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Evelyn Ashley 631 50.4 -4.5
Conservative Ivor Guest 62249.6+4.5
Majority90.8-9.0
Turnout 1,25382.1-2.1
Registered electors 1,526
Liberal hold Swing -4.5
General election 1874: Poole [42]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Charles Waring 705 54.9 +7.4
Conservative Arthur Guest 58045.17.4
Majority1259.8N/A
Turnout 1,28584.210.2
Registered electors 1,526
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +7.4

Elections in the 1860s

General election 1868: Poole [42]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Arthur Guest 623 52.5 +26.5
Liberal Charles Waring 56347.526.5
Majority605.1N/A
Turnout 1,18694.4+11.7
Registered electors 1,256
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +26.5
General election 1865: Poole [42]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Henry Danby Seymour 258 37.7 +2.2
Liberal Charles Waring 248 36.3 +10.0
Conservative Stephen Lewin [45] 17826.012.2
Majority7010.2N/A
Turnout 431 (est)82.7 (est)+14.7
Registered electors 521
Liberal hold Swing +4.2
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +8.1

Elections in the 1850s

General election 1859: Poole [42]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative George Woodroffe Franklyn 208 38.2 +0.2
Liberal Henry Danby Seymour 193 35.5 6.9
Liberal William Taylor Haly14326.3+6.6
Majority152.816.0
Turnout 376 (est)68.0 (est)+21.8
Registered electors 553
Conservative hold Swing +0.2
Liberal hold Swing 3.5
General election 1857: Poole [42]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig Henry Danby Seymour 211 42.4 N/A
Conservative George Woodroffe Franklyn 189 38.0 N/A
Radical William Taylor Haly [46] [47] 9819.7N/A
Turnout 249 (est)46.2 (est)
Registered electors 539
Majority224.4N/A
Whig hold Swing N/A
Majority9118.3N/A
Conservative hold Swing N/A
General election 1852: Poole [42]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig Henry Danby Seymour Unopposed
Conservative George Woodroffe Franklyn Unopposed
Registered electors 508
Whig hold
Conservative gain from Peelite
By-election, 24 September 1850: Poole [42]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig Henry Danby Seymour 187 52.8 6.4
Conservative John Savage [48] 16747.2+13.6
Majority205.617.9
Turnout 35471.1+2.6
Registered electors 498
Whig gain from Peelite Swing 10.0

Elections in the 1840s

General election 1847: Poole [42]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Peelite George Richard Robinson 240 33.6 +3.6
Whig George Philips 220 30.8 2.6
Whig Edward John Hutchins 20328.48.2
Radical Montague Merryweather Turner [49] [50] 527.3N/A
Turnout 358 (est)68.5 (est)18.9
Registered electors 522
Majority202.8N/A
Peelite gain from Whig Swing +7.2
Majority16823.5+20.0
Whig hold Swing 2.2
General election 1841: Poole [42] [15]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig Charles Ponsonby 231 36.6 +8.8
Whig George Philips 211 33.4 +7.5
Conservative George Pitt Rose [51] 18930.016.4
Majority223.5+1.8
Turnout 410 (est)87.4 (est)c.+9.3
Registered electors 469
Whig hold Swing +8.5
Whig hold Swing +7.9

Elections in the 1830s

General election 1837: Poole [42] [15]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig Charles Ponsonby 278 27.8 10.9
Whig George Philips 259 25.9 7.6
Conservative Henry Willoughby 24224.2+4.2
Conservative John Walsh 22222.2+14.5
Majority171.711.8
Turnout 50478.1c.+12.1
Registered electors 645
Whig hold Swing 10.1
Whig hold Swing 8.5
By-election, 21 May 1835: Poole [42] [15]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig George Byng 199 53.4 18.8
Conservative Colquhoun Grant 17446.6+18.9
Majority256.76.8
Turnout 37382.9c.+16.9
Registered electors 450
Whig hold Swing 18.9
General election 1835: Poole [42] [15]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig John Byng 230 38.7 +9.5
Whig Charles Augustus Tulk 199 33.5 +7.2
Conservative John Irving11920.0N/A
Conservative T Bonar467.7N/A
Majority8013.5+10.7
Turnout c.297c.66.0c.21.4
Registered electors 450
Whig hold
Whig hold
General election 1832: Poole [42] [15]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Whig Benjamin Lester Lester 284 44.5
Whig John Byng 186 29.2
Whig Charles Augustus Tulk 16826.3
Majority182.8
Turnout 36087.4
Registered electors 412
Whig hold
Whig hold
By-election, 6 October 1831: Poole [15] [52]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Whig John Byng 55 56.7
Whig Charles Augustus Tulk 4243.3
Majority1313.4
Turnout 97c.60.6
Registered electors c.160
Whig hold
General election 1831: Poole [15] [52]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Whig Benjamin Lester Lester Unopposed
Whig William Ponsonby Unopposed
Registered electors c.160
Whig hold
Whig hold
General election 1830: Poole [15] [52]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Whig Benjamin Lester Lester Unopposed
Whig William Ponsonby Unopposed
Registered electors c.160
Whig hold
Whig hold

See also

Notes and references

Notes
  1. A county constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
  2. As with all constituencies, the constituency elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least every 5 years.
  3. Having stood for UKIP in 2015 Dr David Young was in September 2019 adopted to be the Brexit Party candidate. Following that party's withdrawal of all its candidates in seats held by the Conservatives he decided to stand as an Independent.
References
  1. "Electorate Figures – Boundary Commission for England". 2011 Electorate Figures. Boundary Commission for England. 4 March 2011. Archived from the original on 6 November 2010. Retrieved 13 March 2011.
  2. Unemployment claimants by constituency The Guardian
  3. 1 2 "Local statistics - Office for National Statistics". neighbourhood.statistics.gov.uk.
  4. Morris, Steven. "£3m for modest bungalow needing TLC", The Guardian 2 November 2005.
  5. "2011 census interactive maps". Archived from the original on 29 January 2016.
  6. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 "History of Parliament". History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 13 November 2011.
  7. 1 2 3 4 Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "P" (part 2)
  8. Browne Willis and Cobbett both list Cooper as Poole's MP. Cooper was also elected for Wiltshire, and seems to have been regarded as its Member, but there appears no record of another Member having been elected for Poole in his place
  9. Cobbett again lists Cooper (elected for Wiltshire) as Poole's MP together with Bond, but Browne Willis gives Fitzjames as the second member
  10. Succeeded to baronetcy, February 1662
  11. Expelled from the House of Commons, 15 February 1711, for "great Frauds and Abuses in his Contract for furnishing the Navy with Beer"
  12. Expelled from the House of Commons, 30 March 1732, for his role in the fraudulent sale of the Earl of Derwentwater's estate
  13. Major-General from 1758
  14. On petition, Stuart was declared not to have been duly elected and his opponent, Taylor, was declared elected in his place
  15. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Stooks Smith, Henry. (1973) [1844-1850]. Craig, F. W. S. (ed.). The Parliaments of England (2nd ed.). Chichester: Parliamentary Research Services. pp.  89–90. ISBN   0-900178-13-2.
  16. Hall, Catherine; Draper, Nicholas; McClelland, Keith; Donington, Katie; Lang, Rachel (2014). "Appendix 4: MPs 1832–80 in the compensation records". Legacies of British Slave-ownership: Colonial Slavery and the Formation of Victorian Britain. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 290. ISBN   978-1-107-04005-2 . Retrieved 22 April 2018.
  17. 1 2 Dod, Charles Roger (1843). "House of Commons". The Parliamentary Companion, Volume 11. London: Whitaker & Company. pp. 133, 222. Retrieved 22 April 2018.
  18. 1 2 3 Mosse, Richard Bartholomew (1838). "House of Commons". The Parliamentary Guide: a concise history of the Members of both Houses, etc. pp. 148, 205–206. Retrieved 22 April 2018.
  19. Gash, Norman (2013). Politics in the Age of Peel: A Study in the Technique of Parliamentary Representation, 1830–1850. Faber & Faber. p. 330. ISBN   9780571302901 . Retrieved 22 April 2018.
  20. 1 2 3 Churton, Edward (1838). The Assembled Commons or Parliamentary Biographer: 1838. pp. 46, 182, 185.
  21. "Ireland" . John Bull. 22 March 1851. p. 11. Retrieved 30 September 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  22. "Ireland" . London Daily News. 20 March 1851. p. 6. Retrieved 30 September 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  23. 1 2 Farrell, Stephen (2009). "PHILIPS, George Richard (1789–1883), of 12 Hill Street, Berkeley Square, Mdx". The History of Parliament. Retrieved 30 June 2018.
  24. "The Poole Election" . John Bull . 28 September 1850. p. 8. Retrieved 30 June 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  25. Stooks Smith, Henry (1845). The Parliaments of England, from 1st George I., to the Present Time. Vol II: Oxfordshire to Wales Inclusive. London: Simpkin, Marshall, & Co. p. 133.
  26. "SOPN" (PDF).
  27. "Apology for unknowing selection of former UKIP activist who lied about his CV as Green candidate in Poole". Green Party. Retrieved 5 April 2020.
  28. The Green Party distanced themselves from this former UKIP activist after it emerged that he had lied on his CV, including a claim of being elected as a front bench senator in the upper house of the Parliament of Malta, an institution that was abolished in 1933. [27]
  29. "Election Data 2015". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 17 October 2015. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  30. "UK Polling Report". ukpollingreport.co.uk.
  31. "Green Party to field candidates in every constituency in Dorset for the first time". Bournemouth Echo.
  32. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 16 April 2015. Retrieved 25 February 2015.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  33. "Election Data 2010". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 26 July 2013. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  34. "BBC NEWS – Election 2010 – Poole". BBC News.
  35. "Election Data 2005". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  36. "Election Data 2001". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  37. "Election Data 1997". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  38. "Election Data 1992". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  39. "Politics Resources". Election 1992. Politics Resources. 9 April 1992. Archived from the original on 24 July 2011. Retrieved 6 December 2010.
  40. "Election Data 1987". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  41. "Election Data 1983". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  42. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Craig, F. W. S., ed. (1977). British Parliamentary Election Results 1832-1885(e-book)|format= requires |url= (help) (1st ed.). London: Macmillan Press. pp. 244–245. ISBN   978-1-349-02349-3.
  43. "Election Intelligence: Poole" . Reading Mercury . 19 April 1884. p. 5. Retrieved 21 December 2017 via British Newspaper Archive.
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Sources

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