South Devon (UK Parliament constituency)

Last updated
South Devon
Former County constituency
for the House of Commons
United Kingdom general election 1837.svg
United Kingdom general election 1837.svg
Context of 1832-1868. Extract from 1837 result: the largest blue area.
County Devon
18321885
Number of membersTwo
Replaced by Totnes
Tavistock
Created from Devon

South Devon, formerly known as the Southern Division of Devon, was parliamentary constituency in the county of Devon in England. From 1832 to 1885 it returned two Knights of the Shire to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, elected by the bloc vote system.

Contents

Boundaries

In 1832 the county of Devon, in south western England, was divided for Parliamentary purposes between this constituency and North Devon. In 1868 the Devon county constituencies were re-arranged into North, South and East Devon divisions. Each of these divisions returned two members of Parliament.

In 1885 the three constituencies were again redrawn, so that Devon was represented by eight single member County constituencies (there were also three borough constituencies, two of which returned two members and the third one member). The county was split between the new smaller constituencies of Ashburton (alternatively the Mid Division), Barnstaple (the North-Western Division), Honiton (the Eastern Division), South Molton (the Northern Division), Tavistock (the Western Division), Tiverton (the North-Eastern Division), Torquay and Totnes (the Southern Division). The constituencies in this redistribution are normally referred to by the distinctive place name rather than the alternative compass point designation, so the South Devon division is considered to have been abolished in 1885.

Members of Parliament

ElectionFirst memberFirst partySecond memberSecond party
1832 Lord John Russell Whig [1] [2] John Crocker Bulteel Whig [1] [2]
1835 Sir John Yarde-Buller, Bt Conservative
May 1835 by-election Montague Parker of Whiteway House Conservative
1841 Lord Courtenay Conservative
1849 by-election Sir Ralph Lopes, Bt Conservative
1854 by-election Sir Lawrence Palk, Bt Conservative
1858 by-election Samuel Trehawke Kekewich Conservative
1868 Sir Massey Lopes, Bt Conservative
1873 by-election John Carpenter Garnier Conservative
1884 by-election John Tremayne Conservative
1885 Constituency abolished

Elections

Elections in the 1840s

General election 1841: South Devon [3] [1]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative John Yarde-Buller Unopposed
Conservative William Courtenay Unopposed
Registered electors 10,783
Conservative hold
Conservative hold
General election 1847: South Devon [3]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative John Yarde-Buller Unopposed
Conservative William Courtenay Unopposed
Registered electors 10,411
Conservative hold
Conservative hold

Courtenay resigned by accepting the office of Steward of the Chiltern Hundreds, causing a by-election.

By-election, 13 February 1849: South Devon [3]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Ralph Lopes Unopposed
Conservative hold

Elections in the 1850s

General election 1852: South Devon [3]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative John Yarde-Buller Unopposed
Conservative Ralph Lopes Unopposed
Registered electors 9,569
Conservative hold
Conservative hold

Lopes' death caused a by-election.

By-election, 14 February 1854: South Devon [3]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Lawrence Palk Unopposed
Conservative hold
General election 1857: South Devon [3]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative John Yarde-Buller Unopposed
Conservative Lawrence Palk Unopposed
Registered electors 9,625
Conservative hold
Conservative hold

Buller was elevated to the peerage, becoming 1st Baron Churston and causing a by-election.

By-election, 6 August 1858: South Devon [3]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Samuel Trehawke Kekewich Unopposed
Conservative hold
General election 1859: South Devon [3]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Samuel Trehawke Kekewich Unopposed
Conservative Lawrence Palk Unopposed
Registered electors 9,466
Conservative hold
Conservative hold

Elections in the 1860s

General election 1865: South Devon [3]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Samuel Trehawke Kekewich Unopposed
Conservative Lawrence Palk Unopposed
Registered electors 9,592
Conservative hold
Conservative hold
General election 1868: South Devon [3]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Massey Lopes 3,23435.3N/A
Conservative Samuel Trehawke Kekewich 3,23335.3N/A
Liberal John Russell 2,69429.4N/A
Majority5395.9N/A
Turnout 5,928 (est)73.7 (est)N/A
Registered electors 8,047
Conservative hold
Conservative hold

Elections in the 1870s

Kekewich's death caused a by-election.

By-election, 17 Jun 1873: South Devon [3]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative John Carpenter Garnier Unopposed
Conservative hold
General election 1874: South Devon [3]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative John Carpenter Garnier Unopposed
Conservative Massey Lopes Unopposed
Registered electors 8,350
Conservative hold
Conservative hold

Lopes was appointed a Civil Lord of the Admiralty, requiring a by-election.

By-election, 19 Mar 1874: South Devon [3]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Massey Lopes Unopposed
Conservative hold

Elections in the 1880s

General election 1880: South Devon [3]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative John Carpenter Garnier Unopposed
Conservative Massey Lopes Unopposed
Registered electors 7,982
Conservative hold
Conservative hold

Garnier resigned, causing a by-election.

By-election, 14 Aug 1884: South Devon [3]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative John Tremayne Unopposed
Conservative hold

See also

Related Research Articles

East Gloucestershire (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1832-1885

East Gloucestershire, formally the Eastern division of Gloucestershire and often referred to as Gloucestershire Eastern, was a parliamentary constituency in Gloucestershire, represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) using the bloc vote system.

South Norfolk (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1885 onwards

South Norfolk is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2001 by Richard Bacon, a Conservative.

South Leicestershire (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 2010 onwards

South Leicestershire is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2015 by Alberto Costa, a member of the Conservative Party.

Chippenham (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 2010 onwards

Chippenham is a parliamentary constituency, abolished in 1983 but recreated in 2010, and represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It elects one Member of Parliament by the first past the post system of election. The 2010 constituency includes the towns of Bradford on Avon, Chippenham, Corsham and Melksham.

Antrim is a former UK Parliament constituency in Ireland. It was a two-member constituency and existed in two periods, 1801–1885 and 1922–1950.

Chelsea (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1885-1997

Chelsea was a borough constituency, represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

Cambridgeshire is a former Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom. It was a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of England then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1885.

Accrington (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1885-1983

Accrington was a parliamentary constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1885 to 1983. It elected one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first-past-the-post system of election.

North Cheshire (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1832-1868

North Cheshire is a former United Kingdom Parliamentary constituency. It was created upon the division of Cheshire in 1832. In 1868 it was abolished with South Cheshire to form East Cheshire, Mid Cheshire, West Cheshire and Stalybridge.

Westmorland (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1918-1983

Westmorland was a constituency covering the county of Westmorland in the North of England, which returned Members of Parliament to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

West Gloucestershire (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1950-1997

West Gloucestershire was a parliamentary constituency in Gloucestershire, represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

East Norfolk (UK Parliament constituency) Former UK parliamentary constituency

East Norfolk was a constituency in the county of Norfolk that returned two Members of Parliament to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom until 1868. A namesake was created in 1885 with representation of one member. That seat was abolished in 1950.

East Dorset is a former United Kingdom Parliamentary constituency. It was formally known as the Eastern Division of Dorset. It was a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It was represented by one Knight of the Shire.

East Cornwall (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1832-1885

East Cornwall was a county constituency in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) by the bloc vote system of election.

West Cornwall (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1832-1885

West Cornwall was a county constituency in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) by the bloc vote system of election.

West Cumberland (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1832-1885

West Cumberland was a county constituency in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) by the bloc vote system of election.

South Durham (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1832-1885

South Durham, formally the Southern Division of Durham and often referred to as Durham Southern, was a county constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) by the bloc vote system of election.

Monmouthshire was a county constituency of the House of Commons of Parliament of England from 1536 until 1707, of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1801, and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1885. It elected two Members of Parliament (MPs).

West Norfolk (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1832-1885

West Norfolk or Norfolk Western was a county constituency in the county of Norfolk, which returned two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, elected by the bloc vote system.

South Nottinghamshire, formally the "Southern Division of Nottinghamshire" was a county constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) by the bloc vote system of election.

References

  1. 1 2 3 Stooks Smith, Henry. (1973) [1844-1850]. Craig, F. W. S. (ed.). The Parliaments of England (2nd ed.). Chichester: Parliamentary Research Services. p. 62. ISBN   0-900178-13-2.
  2. 1 2 Gash, Norman (2013). Politics in the Age of Peel: A Study in the Technique of Parliamentary Representation, 1830–1850. Faber & Faber. p. 247. ISBN   9780571302901 . Retrieved 5 April 2019 via Google Books.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Craig, F. W. S., ed. (1977). British Parliamentary Election Results 1832-1885 (1st ed.). London: Macmillan Press. pp. 378–379. ISBN   978-1-349-02349-3.