Totnes (UK Parliament constituency)

Last updated

Totnes
County constituency
for the House of Commons
Totnes2007Constituency.svg
Boundary of Totnes in Devon
EnglandDevon.svg
Location of Devon within England
County Devon
Electorate 67,562 (December 2010) [1]
Major settlements Totnes, Dartmouth, Kingsbridge, Salcombe and Brixham
Current constituency
Created 1997
Member of Parliament Anthony Mangnall (Conservative Party)
Number of membersOne
Created from South Hams constituency
18851983
Number of membersOne
Type of constituency County constituency
Replaced by Teignbridge and South Hams [2]
Created from South Devon
1295–1868
Number of membersTwo
Type of constituency Borough constituency
Replaced by Devon Southern
Overlaps
European Parliament constituency South West England

Totnes is a Parliamentary constituency [n 1] represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2019 by Conservative Anthony Mangnall. Mangnall defeated incumbent Dr Sarah Wollaston who had originally been elected as a Conservative but defected to the Liberal Democrats earlier that year. [n 2]

Contents

History

The current constituency was formed for the 1997 general election, from parts of the former South Hams constituency. This had, in 1983, largely replaced the previous Totnes constituency, which had existed in a wide form since 1885, but in a much narrower form from the Model Parliament.

An original parliamentary borough of Totnes or Totness [3] had been created in 1295. It returned two MPs to the House of Commons of England until 1707, then to the House of Commons of Great Britain until 1800, and finally to the House of Commons of the United Kingdom from 1801 until it was abolished under the Representation of the People Act 1867 with effect from the 1868 election.

Political history

The modern constituency returned Conservatives in general elections since its 1997 recreation, which suggests a safe seat, though it came close to falling to the Liberal Democrats in 1997, and the sitting MP, Dr. Sarah Wollaston, defected to the Liberal Democrats in 2019, after a brief spell as an independent, and prior to that as a member of Change UK, a new centrist party which formed from MPs formerly Conservative, and formerly Labour, after she became disillusioned with the Conservative Party's position on Brexit. She had been a Conservative MP since 2010.

During the 2016 EU Referendum, Totnes is estimated to have narrowly voted to Leave, by 53.9% vs. 46.1% Remain, although the town of Totnes itself is a Remain stronghold, the rural areas of the constituency voted in favour of Brexit.

Boundaries

1885–1918: The Municipal Borough of Totnes, and the Sessional Divisions of Ermington and Plympton, and Stanborough and Coleridge.

1918–1950: The Municipal Borough of Totnes, the Urban Districts of Ashburton, Buckfastleigh, Kingsbridge, Newton Abbot, Salcombe, and Teignmouth, the Rural District of Kingsbridge, and parts of the Rural Districts of Newton Abbot and Totnes.

1950–1974: The Municipal Boroughs of Clifton, Dartmouth, Hardness, and Totnes, the Urban Districts of Ashburton, Buckfastleigh, Kingsbridge, Newton Abbot, and Salcombe, the Rural Districts of Kingsbridge and Newton Abbot, and part of the Rural District of Totnes.

1974–1983: The Municipal Boroughs of Clifton, Dartmouth, Hardness, and Totnes, the Urban Districts of Ashburton, Buckfastleigh, Kingsbridge, Newton Abbot, and Salcombe, and the Rural Districts of Kingsbridge, Newton Abbot, and Totnes.

1997–2010: The District of South Hams wards of Avon and Harbourne, Avonleigh, Dartington, Dartmouth Clifton, Dartmouth Hardness, Dart Valley, Eastmoor, Garabrook, Kingsbridge, Kingswear, Malborough, Marldon, Salcombe, Saltstone, Skerries, South Brent, Stoke Gabriel, Stokenham, Thurlestone, Totnes, Totnes Bridgetown, and West Dart, the Borough of Torbay wards of Blatchcombe, Furzeham with Churston, and St Peter's with St Mary's, and the District of Teignbridge wards of Ambrook, Ashburton, and Buckfastleigh.

2010–present: The District of South Hams wards of Allington and Loddiswell, Avon and Harbourne, Dartington, Dartmouth and Kingswear, Dartmouth Townstal, East Dart, Eastmoor, Kingsbridge East, Kingsbridge North, Marldon, Salcombe and Malborough, Saltstone, Skerries, South Brent, Stokenham, Thurlestone, Totnes Bridgetown, Totnes Town, West Dart, and Westville and Alvington, and the Borough of Torbay wards of Berry Head with Furzeham, Blatchcombe, Churston with Galmpton, and St Mary’s with Summercombe.

The Totnes constituency covers the eastern part of the South Hams district of Devon, including the towns of Totnes, Dartmouth, Kingsbridge and Salcombe, as well as parts of the unitary authority of Torbay, including the town of Brixham.

Constituency profile

The seat covers the undulating Totnes area in south Devon, which also includes the towns of Brixham, South, and Western Paignton which is in Torbay. Workless claimants, registered jobseekers, were in November 2012 significantly lower than the national average of 3.8%, at 2.4% of the population based on a statistical compilation by The Guardian . [4]

Members of Parliament

MPs 1295–1660

Constituency created 1295

ParliamentFirst memberSecond member
1362 Richard Whitelegh [5]
1366 John Prescott [6]
1372 John Prescott [6]
1373 John Prescott [6]
1377 (Jan) William Burlestone
1377 (Oct) William Burlestone
1380 (Jan) William Burlestone
1381 William Burlestone
1383 (Feb) William Burlestone [7]
1386 Robert French John Pasford [8]
1388 (Feb) John Row Walter Browning [8]
1388 (Sep) John Statham Walter Browning [8]
1390 (Jan) John Poltimore Walter Hotot [8]
1390 (Nov)
1391 John Grey Thomas Norris [8]
1393 John Suell Robert Barneburgh [8]
1394 Richard Whitelegh John Pasford [8]
1395 Ellis Beare John Marshall [8]
1397 (Jan) John Gunne Ellis Beare [8]
1397 (Sep)
1399 Simon Marsh John Rose [8]
1401
1402 Henry Spencer John Hulle [8]
1404 (Jan)
1404 (Oct)
1406 Robert Wastell John Warwick [8]
1407 Alfred Wonston Sir John Pomeroy [8]
1410 Henry Austin Robert Wastell [8]
1411 John Bosom Henry Bremeler [8]
1413 (Feb)
1413 (May) John Sebright Henry Austin [8]
1414 (Apr)
1414 (Nov) William Ryder Henry Berkeley [8]
1415
1416 (Mar)
1416 (Oct)
1417
1419
1420 John Ash Walter Serle [8]
1421 (May) Henry Berkeley Thomas Kirkby [8]
1421 (Dec) Henry Chesewell William Cosyn [8]
1455 William Fowell [9] of Fowelscombe
1472 William Hody [10]
1491 Lewis Pollard [11]
1510-1523No names known [12]
1529 John Giles Adam Ralegh [12]
1536?
1539?
1542?
1545 Roger Prideaux John Gale [12]
1547 Roger Prideaux Edmund Sture [12]
1553 (Mar) John Wotton Christopher Savery [12]
1553 (Oct) John Wotton Christopher Savery [12]
1554 (Apr) John Eveleigh Henry Gildon [12]
1554 (Nov) Richard Savery Christopher Savery [12]
1555 Peter Edgecombe Leonard Yeo [12]
1558 Bernard Smith Leonard Yeo [12]
1558/9 Leonard Yeo Sir Nicholas Poyntz [13]
1562/3Sir Arthur Champernowne Richard Edgecombe I [13]
1571 Richard Hurleston John Stanhope [13]
1572 Robert Monson, made judge
and repl. 1576 by
Robert Beale
Edward Buggin [13]
1584 Christopher Savery Nicholas Ball [13]
1586 John Giles Nicholas Hayman [13]
1588 Richard Edgecombe Simon Kelway [13]
1593 Richard Sparry Christopher Savery [13]
1597 Edward Giles Christopher Buggin [13]
1601 Leonard Darr Philip Holditch [13]
1604 Christopher Brocking Walter Dollings
1614 Nathaniel Rich Lawrence Adams
1621–1622 Sir Edward Giles Richard Rodd
1624 Arthur Champernoun Sir Edward Giles
1625 Sir Edward Seymour, 2nd Baronet Sir Edward Giles
1626 Arthur Champernoun Philip Holditch
1628-1629 Sir Edward Giles Thomas Prestwood
1629–1640No Parliaments summoned
Apr 1640 Oliver St John John Maynard
Nov 1640 Oliver St John John Maynard
1645 Oliver St John John Maynard
1648 Oliver St John John Maynard
1653Totnes not represented in Barebone's Parliament
1654 Major-General Desborough (one seat only)
1656 Christopher Maynard (one seat only)
1659 Capt. John Pleydell Gilbert Evelyn

MPs 1660–1868

Two members

YearFirst member [14] First partySecond member [14] Second party
1660 Thomas Chafe Thomas Clifford
1661 Sir Edward Seymour, 3rd Baronet Tory
1673 Sir Thomas Berry
Feb 1679 John Kelland
Aug 1679 Edward Seymour (later 4th Baronet) Tory
1681 Charles Kelland John Kelland
1685 Sir Edward Seymour, 3rd Baronet Tory
1689 Rawlin Mallock Sir John Fowell, Bt
1690 Henry Seymour Portman
1692 Thomas Coulson
1695 Sir Edward Seymour, 4th Baronet Tory Edward Yarde
1698 Thomas Coulson
1699 Francis Gwyn
1701 Sir Christopher Musgrave, Bt
1702 William Seymour Tory
1705 Sir Humphrey Mackworth Tory
1708 Sir Edward Seymour, 5th Baronet Tory George Courtenay
1710 Thomas Coulson Francis Gwyn
1713 Stephen Northleigh
1715 Arthur Champernowne
1717 Sir John Germain, Bt
1718Sir Charles Wills
1722 Joseph Banks
1727 Exton Sayer
1732 Sir Henry Gough, Bt
1734 Sir Joseph Danvers, Bt
1742 John Strange Whig
1747 Charles Taylor
Apr 1754 Browse Trist
Dec 1754 Sir Richard Lloyd
1759 Richard Savage Lloyd
1763 Henry Seymour
1768 Sir Philip Jennings-Clerke, Bt Peter Burrell
1774 James Amyatt
1780 Launcelot Brown
1784 The Hon. Henry Phipps Tory
1788 Viscount Barnard Whig
1790 William Powlett Powlett Sir Francis Buller Yarde, Bt
1796 The Lord Arden Lord George Seymour
1801 William Adams Tory [15]
1802 John Berkeley Burland
1804 Vicary Gibbs Tory [15]
1806 Benjamin Hall Tory [15]
1811 Thomas Courtenay Tory [15]
1812 Ayshford Wise Whig [15]
1818 William Holmes Tory [15]
1820 John Bent
1826 The Earl of Darlington Tory [15]
1830 Charles Barry Baldwin Tory [15] [16]
1832 Jasper Parrott Whig [15] James Cornish Whig [15]
1835 Lord Seymour Whig [15] [17] [18]
1839William Blount [n 3] [15] [19] [20] (Whig) Charles Barry Baldwin [n 3] (Con) [15] [16] [17] [21]
1840 Charles Barry Baldwin Conservative
1852 Thomas Mills Whig
1855 The Earl of Gifford Whig
1859 Liberal Liberal
1862 John Pender Liberal
1863 Alfred Seymour Liberal
1866 John Pender declared not duly elected and seat left vacant
1868 Constituency disenfranchised by the Reform Act 1867

MPs 1885–1983

One member

YearMember [14] Whip
1885 Francis Mildmay Liberal
1886 Liberal Unionist
1912 Unionist
1922 Samuel Harvey Unionist
1923 Henry Vivian Liberal
1924 Samuel Harvey Unionist
1935 Ralph Rayner Conservative
1955 Ray Mawby Conservative
1983 constituency abolished: see South Hams and Teignbridge

MPs since 1997

Between 1983 and 1997 the constituency was replaced by the South Hams constituency. Anthony Steen was returned at every election.

ElectionMember [14] Party
1997 Anthony Steen Conservative
2010 Dr Sarah Wollaston Conservative
2019 Change UK
Independent
Liberal Democrats
2019 Anthony Mangnall Conservative

Elections

Elections in the 2010s

General election 2019: Totnes [22]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Anthony Mangnall 27,751 53.2 Decrease2.svg 0.5
Liberal Democrats Sarah Wollaston 15,02728.8Increase2.svg 15.9
Labour Louise Webberley8,86017.0Decrease2.svg 9.9
Independent John Kitson5441.0N/A
Majority12,72424.4Decrease2.svg 2.5
Turnout 52,18274.7Increase2.svg 1.63
Conservative hold Swing Decrease2.svg 8.2
General election 2017: Totnes [23]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Sarah Wollaston 26,972 53.7 Increase2.svg 0.7
Labour Gerrie Messer13,49526.8Increase2.svg 14.1
Liberal Democrats Julian Brazil6,46612.9Increase2.svg 3.0
Green Jacqi Hodgson2,0974.2Decrease2.svg 6.1
UKIP Steven Harvey1,2402.5Decrease2.svg 11.7
Majority13,47726.9Decrease2.svg 11.9
Turnout 50,35373.07Increase2.svg 4.5
Conservative hold Swing Decrease2.svg 6.7
General election 2015: Totnes [24] [25]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Sarah Wollaston 24,941 53.0 +7.1
UKIP Justin Haque6,65614.1+8.1
Labour Nicky Williams5,98812.7+5.3
Green Gill Coombs4,84510.3+7.8
Liberal Democrats Julian Brazil4,6679.9-25.7
Majority18,38538.8+28.5
Turnout 47,09768.6-1.8
Conservative hold Swing
General election 2010: Totnes [26] [27]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Sarah Wollaston 21,940 45.9 +3.0
Liberal Democrats Julian Brazil17,01335.6−1.5
Labour Carole Whitty3,5387.4−4.7
UKIP Jeffrey Beer2,8906.0−1.5
Green Lydia Somerville1,1812.5+2.5
BNP Mike Turner6241.3+1.3
Independent Simon Drew 3900.8+0.8
Independent Stephen Hopwood2670.6+0.6
Majority4,92710.3+4.5
Turnout 47,84370.4+0.7
Conservative hold Swing +2.3

Elections in the 2000s

General election 2005: Totnes [28]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Anthony Steen 21,112 41.7 −2.8
Liberal Democrats Mike Treleaven19,16537.9+0.7
Labour Valerie Burns6,18512.20.0
UKIP Roger Knapman 3,9147.7+1.6
Independent Michael Thompson1990.4+0.4
Majority1,9473.8-3.5
Turnout 50,57567.7−0.2
Conservative hold Swing −1.7
General election 2001: Totnes [29]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Anthony Steen 21,914 44.5 +8.0
Liberal Democrats Rachel Oliver18,31737.2+2.3
Labour Thomas Wildy6,00512.2−4.2
UKIP Craig Mackinlay 3,0106.1+4.3
Majority3,5977.3+5.7
Turnout 49,24667.9−7.9
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1990s

General election 1997: Totnes [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Anthony Steen 19,637 36.5
Liberal Democrats Rob Chave18,76034.9
Labour Victor Ellery8,79616.4
Referendum Pamela Cook2,5524.7
Ind. Conservative Christopher Venmore2,3694.4
UKIP H.W. Thomas9991.9
Green Andy Pratt5481.0
Independent James Golding1080.2
Majority8771.6
Turnout 53,76975.8
Conservative win (new seat)

Elections in the 1970s

General election 1979: Totnes
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Ray Mawby 35,010 52.16
Liberal Anthony H. Rogers24,44536.42
Labour J. Duffin7,66811.42
Majority10,56515.74
Turnout 79.95
Conservative hold Swing
General election October 1974: Totnes
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Ray Mawby 27,987 45.18
Liberal Anthony H. Rogers21,58634.85
Labour S.M. Spence12,36619.96
Majority6,40110.33
Turnout 76.74
Conservative hold Swing
General election February 1974: Totnes
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Ray Mawby 30,565 46.93
Liberal Anthony H. Rogers20,92232.12
Labour Harold M. Luscombe13,24920.34
Independent J. Lewis3940.60
Majority9,64314.81
Turnout 81.29
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1970: Totnes
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Ray Mawby 31,519 54.85
Labour Robert Blank16,42928.59
Liberal David Penhaligon 9,51516.56
Majority15,09026.26
Turnout 76.67
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1960s

General election 1966: Totnes
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Ray Mawby 25,623 47.81
Labour Barry Smethurst16,90031.54
Liberal Paul Tyler 11,06620.65
Majority8,72316.28
Turnout 79.43
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1964: Totnes
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Ray Mawby 25,417 48.64
Labour Reginald C.J. Scott14,54227.83
Liberal Edward B. Taylor12,29723.53
Majority10,87520.81
Turnout 78.83
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1950s

General election 1959: Totnes
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Ray Mawby 26,925 53.04
Labour Terence J.B. Heelas13,11625.84
Liberal T. Cedric Jones10,71921.12
Majority13,80927.20
Turnout 80.48
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1955: Totnes
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Ray Mawby 26,381 52.10
Labour Daniel J.P. Mann14,78729.20
Liberal Arthur Claude Shobbrook9,47118.70
Majority11,59422.90
Turnout 80.75
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1951: Totnes
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Ralph Rayner 28,005 53.60
Labour Charles A. O'Donnell16,40931.40
Liberal Harold Ernest Desch7,83815.00
Majority11,59622.19
Turnout 82.85
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1950: Totnes
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Ralph Rayner 26,104 49.01
Labour D. Widdicombe15,76729.60
Liberal Harold Ernest Desch10,97420.60
Communist E. Tapscott4230.79
Majority10,33719.41
Turnout 84.59
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1940s

General election 1945: Totnes
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Ralph Rayner 24,638 51.04
Labour J.R. Warde16,09833.35
Liberal Thomas Henry Aggett7,53615.61
Majority8,54017.69
Turnout 74.57
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1930s

General Election 1939/40: Another General Election was required to take place before the end of 1940. The political parties had been making preparations for an election to take place and by the Autumn of 1939, the following candidates had been selected;

General election 1935: Totnes
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Ralph Rayner 24,815 53.59
Liberal Ernest Haylor 17,63938.10
Labour William Roy John Henwood3,8488.31
Majority7,17615.50
Turnout 79.24
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1931: Totnes
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Samual Harvey 26,765 56.99
Liberal Ernest Haylor 20,20343.01
Majority6,56213.97
Turnout 83.41
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1920s

General election 1929: Totnes [32]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Unionist Samual Harvey 21,673 47.8 -5.9
Liberal Philip Foale Rowsell 17,79039.3-0.9
Labour Kate Spurrell 5,82812.9+6.8
Majority3,8838.5-5.0
Turnout 83.1-3.0
Unionist hold Swing -2.5
General election 1924: Totnes
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Unionist Samual Harvey 19,771 53.7
Liberal Henry Vivian 14,78640.2
Labour Kate Spurrell 2,2406.1
Majority4,98513.5
Turnout 86.1
Unionist gain from Liberal Swing
General election 6 December 1923: Totnes
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Henry Vivian 16,845 50.8 +3.2
Unionist Samual Harvey 16,34349.2-3.2
Majority5021.66.4
Turnout 80.7+2.6
Liberal gain from Unionist Swing +3.2
General election 1922: Totnes
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Unionist Samual Harvey 16,532 52.4 -6.4
Liberal Thomas Underdown15,03247.6+6.4
Majority4.8-12.8
Turnout 78.1
Unionist hold Swing -6.4

Election results 1885-1918

Elections in the 1910s

General election 1918: Totnes
PartyCandidateVotes%±
C Unionist Francis Mildmay 14,68058.8-4.5
Liberal John Cairns [33] 10,26641.2+4.5
Majority4,41417.6-9.0
Turnout 63.9-18.1
Unionist hold Swing -4.5
Cindicates candidate endorsed by the coalition government.

General Election 1914/15:

Another General Election was required to take place before the end of 1915. The political parties had been making preparations for an election to take place and by the July 1914, the following candidates had been selected;

General election December 1910: Totnes [35] [36]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Unionist Francis Mildmay 5,252 63.3 +2.7
Liberal Robert Dunstan 3,04036.7-2.7
Majority2,21226.6+5.4
Turnout 82.0-7.9
Liberal Unionist hold Swing +2.7
Foot 1910 Isaac Foot.jpg
Foot
General election January 1910: Totnes [35] [36]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Unionist Francis Mildmay 5,505 60.6 -2.9
Liberal Isaac Foot 3,57839.4+2.9
Majority1,92721.2-5.8
Turnout 89.9+2.1
Liberal Unionist hold Swing -2.9

Elections in the 1880s

Lopes Henry Lopes.jpg
Lopes
General election 1885: Totnes [35] [37] [38]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Francis Mildmay 4,389 57.4 N/A
Conservative Henry Lopes 3,25242.6N/A
Majority1,13714.8N/A
Turnout 7,64183.2N/A
Registered electors 9,188
Liberal win (new seat)
Mildmay Francis Bingham Mildmay.jpg
Mildmay
General election 1886: Totnes [35] [37]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Unionist Francis Mildmay 4,652 80.3 +37.7
Liberal Edward Pearce-Edgcumbe1,14119.737.7
Majority3,51160.6N/A
Turnout 5,79363.0-20.2
Registered electors 9,188
Liberal Unionist gain from Liberal Swing +37.7

Elections in the 1900s

General election 1906: Totnes [35] [37]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Unionist Francis Mildmay 5,226 63.5 N/A
Liberal Lewis Humfrey Edmunds2,99836.5N/A
Majority2,22827.0N/A
Turnout 8,22487.8N/A
Registered electors 9,370
Liberal Unionist hold Swing N/A
General election 1900: Totnes [35] [37] [39]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Unionist Francis Mildmay Unopposed
Liberal Unionist hold

Elections in the 1890s

General election 1895: Totnes [35] [37] [39]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Unionist Francis Mildmay 4,630 67.2 +0.3
Liberal Alfred John Sparke2,26432.8-0.3
Majority2,36634.4+0.6
Turnout 6,89473.1-4.6
Registered electors 9,431
Liberal Unionist hold Swing +0.3
General election 1892: Totnes [35] [37]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Unionist Francis Mildmay 4,815 66.9 -13.4
Liberal Alfred Herbert Lush2,38433.1+13.4
Majority2,43133.8-26.8
Turnout 7,19977.7+14.7
Registered electors 9,263
Liberal Unionist hold Swing -13.4

Election results 1832-1868

Elections in the 1860s

General election 1865: Totnes [40]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal John Pender 210 29.0 9.5
Liberal Alfred Seymour 204 28.2 4.3
Conservative William Gregory Dawkins16222.4+7.9
Conservative Bedford Pim 14720.3+5.8
Majority425.8+2.2
Turnout 362 (est)94.6 (est)+6.3
Registered electors 382
Liberal hold Swing 8.2
Liberal hold Swing 5.6

On petition, Pender was unseated on 22 March 1866. No writ was issued to replace him and, in 1868, the seat was disenfranchised and absorbed into South Devon.

By-election, 20 January 1863: Totnes [40]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Alfred Seymour 165 51.2 19.8
Conservative John Dent15748.8+19.9
Majority82.51.1
Turnout 32290.2+1.9
Registered electors 357
Liberal hold Swing 19.9

By-election caused by the death of George Hay.

By-election, 9 December 1862: Totnes [40]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal John Pender 171 97.2 +26.2
Conservative John Dent [41] 52.826.1
Majority16694.3+90.7
Turnout 17649.339.0
Registered electors 357
Liberal hold Swing +26.2

By-election caused by the death of Thomas Mills.

Elections in the 1850s

General election 1859: Totnes [40]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal George Hay 180 38.5 +4.0
Liberal Thomas Mills 152 32.5 +2.3
Conservative John Dunn [42] 13528.96.4
Majority173.62.9
Turnout 301 (est)88.3 (est)+4.6
Registered electors 341
Liberal hold Swing +3.6
Liberal hold Swing +2.8
General election 1857: Totnes [40] [43] [44]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig George Hay 171 34.5 12.6
Whig Thomas Mills 150 30.2 +2.6
Peelite James Thomas Mackenzie11823.8+11.1
Peelite John Gregory [45] 5711.51.2
Majority326.5+4.2
Turnout 248 (est)78.7 (est)0.8
Registered electors 315
Whig hold Swing 8.8
Whig hold Swing 1.2
By-election, 5 November 1855: Totnes [40]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig George Hay Unopposed
Whig hold

By-election caused by Edward Seymour becoming 12th Duke of Somerset.

General election 1852: Totnes [40]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig Edward Seymour 263 47.1 0.6
Whig Thomas Mills 154 27.6 +1.5
Conservative Charles Barry Baldwin 14125.30.9
Majority132.319.2
Turnout 295 (est)79.5 (est)+1.7
Registered electors 371
Whig hold Swing 0.1
Whig gain from Conservative Swing +1.0
By-election, 30 March 1850: Totnes [40]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig Edward Seymour Unopposed
Whig hold

Seymour was appointed Commissioner of Woods, Forests, Land Revenues, Works, and Buildings, requiring a by-election.

Elections in the 1840s

587

General election 1847: Totnes [40]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Whig Edward Seymour 280 47.7 N/A
Conservative Charles Barry Baldwin 154 26.2 N/A
Whig Samson Ricardo 15326.1N/A
Turnout 294 (est)77.8 (est)N/A
Registered electors 378
Majority12621.5N/A
Whig hold Swing N/A
Majority10.2N/A
Conservative hold Swing N/A
General election 1841: Totnes [40]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Charles Barry Baldwin Unopposed
Whig Edward Seymour Unopposed
Registered electors 391
Conservative hold
Whig hold
By-election, 21 April 1840: Totnes [40]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Charles Barry Baldwin 158 51.1
Whig Thomas Guy Gisborne15148.9
Majority72.3N/A
Turnout 30990.6
Registered electors 341
Conservative hold Swing

The previous by-election was declared void on petition, causing a by-election.

See also

Notes and references

Notes
  1. A county constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
  2. As with all constituencies, the constituency elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least every five years.
  3. 1 2 Both Baldwin and Blount received equal votes at the 1839 by-election and were declared elected. However, this was declared void on 8 April 1840 and a by-election was called
References
  1. "Electorate Figures - Boundary Commission for England". 2011 Electorate Figures. Boundary Commission for England. 4 March 2011. Archived from the original on 6 November 2010. Retrieved 13 March 2011.
  2. "'Totnes', Feb 1974 - May 1983". ElectionWeb Project. Cognitive Computing Limited. Archived from the original on 3 April 2016. Retrieved 24 March 2016.
  3. "No. 19016". The London Gazette . 25 January 1833. p. 170.
  4. Unemployment claimants by constituency The Guardian
  5. "WHITELEGH, Richard, of Osborn Newton in Churchstow, Devon". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 10 May 2013.
  6. 1 2 3 "PRESCOTT, John (c.1327-1412), of Prescott, Rake and Exeter, Devon". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 11 May 2013.
  7. "BURLESTONE (BORLESTON), William (d.1406), of Harberton, Devon. - History of Parliament Online". www.historyofparliamentonline.org.
  8. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 "History of Parliament". History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 4 November 2011.
  9. Vivian, Lt.Col. J.L., (Ed.) The Visitations of the County of Devon: Comprising the Heralds' Visitations of 1531, 1564 & 1620, Exeter, 1895, p.369
  10. Baker, J. H. "Hody, Sir William". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/13456.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  11. Baker, J.H., Biography of Sir Lewis Pollard, published in History of Parliament: House of Commons 1439-1509, eds. Wedgwood, J.C., & Holt A.D.
  12. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 "History of Parliament". History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 4 November 2011.
  13. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 "History of Parliament". History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 4 November 2011.
  14. 1 2 3 4 Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "T" (part 2)
  15. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Stooks Smith, Henry. (1973) [1844-1850]. Craig, F. W. S. (ed.). The Parliaments of England (2nd ed.). Chichester: Parliamentary Research Services. pp. 79–81. ISBN   0-900178-13-2.
  16. 1 2 Jenkins, Terry (2009). Fisher, D. R. (ed.). "BALDWIN, Charles Barry (?1789–1859), of 6 Parliament Street, Mdx". The History of Parliament. Retrieved 15 July 2018.
  17. 1 2 "Totnes Election" . Morning Post. 3 July 1841. pp. 3–4. Retrieved 15 July 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  18. Cobden, Richard (2015). Howe, Anthony; Morgan, Simon; Bannerman, Gordon (eds.). The Letters of Richard Cobden: Volume IV, 1860-1865. Oxford: Oxford University Press. p. 98. ISBN   978-0-19-921198-2. LCCN   2007028194 . Retrieved 15 July 2018 via Google Books.
  19. "The Spectator". 4 January 1840. p. 11. Retrieved 15 July 2018.
  20. "Totness Election - Close of the Poll" . Bucks Herald. 27 July 1839. p. 2. Retrieved 15 July 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  21. "Election Movements in the West of England" . Western Courier, West of England Conservative, Plymouth and Devonport Advertiser. 9 June 1841. p. 3. Retrieved 15 July 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  22. "Totnes parliamentary constituency - Election 2019". BBC. Retrieved 19 December 2019.
  23. "Totnes Parliamentary Constituency results". BBC News. 9 June 2017.
  24. "Election Data 2015". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 17 October 2015. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  25. "Totnes - 2015 Election Results - General Elections Online". geo.digiminster.com. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  26. "Election Data 2010". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 26 July 2013. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  27. "BBC News - Election 2010 - Constituency - Totnes". news.bbc.co.uk.
  28. "Election Data 2005". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  29. "Election Data 2001". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  30. "Election Data 1997". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  31. The Liberal Magazine, 1939
  32. British parliamentary election results 1918-1949, Craig, F.W.S.
  33. ‘CAIRNS, John Arthur Robert’, Who Was Who, A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 1920–2016; online edn, Oxford University Press, 2014 ; online edn, April 2014 accessed 20 Sept 2017
  34. Western Times Devon, 2 Jun 1914
  35. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Craig, F. W. S., ed. (1974). British Parliamentary Election Results: 1885-1918. London: Macmillan Press. p. 262. ISBN   9781349022984.
  36. 1 2 Debrett's House of Commons & Judicial Bench, 1916
  37. 1 2 3 4 5 6 The Liberal Year Book, 1907
  38. Debrett's House of Commons & Judicial Bench, 1886
  39. 1 2 Debrett's House of Commons & Judicial Bench, 1901
  40. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Craig, F. W. S., ed. (1977). British Parliamentary Election Results 1832-1885 (1st ed.). London: Macmillan Press. ISBN   978-1-349-02349-3.
  41. "Totnes" . Kerry Evening Post. 17 December 1862. p. 5. Retrieved 25 March 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  42. "Totnes" . Exeter and Plymouth Gazette. 16 April 1859. p. 5. Retrieved 15 July 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  43. "Totnes Election" . Western Times. 4 April 1857. p. 10. Retrieved 15 July 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  44. "Election Intelligence" . Huddersfield Chronicle. 14 March 1857. p. 8. Retrieved 15 July 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  45. "Election Movements in Devonshore" . Exeter and Plymouth Gazette. 14 March 1857. p. 8. Retrieved 15 July 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.

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