Bishop of Cork and Cloyne

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The Bishop of Cork and Cloyne was an episcopal title which took its name after the city of Cork and the town of Cloyne in southern Ireland.

Episcopal polity Hierarchical form of church governance

An episcopal polity is a hierarchical form of church governance in which the chief local authorities are called bishops. It is the structure used by many of the major Christian Churches and denominations, such as the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Church of the East, Anglican, and Lutheran churches or denominations, and other churches founded independently from these lineages.

Cork (city) City in Munster, Ireland

Cork, is a city in south-west Ireland, in the province of Munster. As of the 2016 census, the city had a population of 125,657, but following a boundary extension in 2019, the population increased to c. 210,000. It is the second largest city in the Republic of Ireland.

Cloyne Town in Munster, Ireland

Cloyne is a small town to the southeast of Midleton in eastern County Cork. It is also a see city of the Anglican Diocese of Cork, Cloyne and Ross, while also giving its name to a Roman Catholic diocese. St Colman's Cathedral in Cloyne is a cathedral church of the Church of Ireland while the Pro Cathedral of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Cloyne, Cobh Cathedral of Saint Colman, overlooks Cork Harbour.

Contents

History

The see was formed by the union of the bishoprics of Cork and Cloyne in 1429. Following the Reformation, there were parallel apostolic successions: one of the Church of Ireland and the other of the Roman Catholic Church.

The Bishop of Cork was a separate episcopal title which took its name after the city of Cork in the Republic of Ireland. The title is now united with other bishoprics. In the Church of Ireland it is held by the Bishop of Cork, Cloyne and Ross, and in the Roman Catholic Church it is held by the Bishop of Cork and Ross.

The Bishop of Cloyne is an episcopal title that takes its name after the small town of Cloyne in County Cork, Republic of Ireland. In the Roman Catholic Church, it is a separate title; but, in the Church of Ireland, it has been united with other bishoprics.

Reformation in Ireland

The Reformation in Ireland was a movement for the reform of religious life and institutions that was introduced into Ireland by the English administration at the behest of King Henry VIII of England. His desire for an annulment of his marriage was known as the King's Great Matter. Ultimately Pope Clement VII refused the petition; consequently, in order to give legal effect to his wishes, it became necessary for the King to assert his lordship over the Catholic Church in his realm. In passing the Acts of Supremacy in 1534, the English Parliament confirmed the King's supremacy over the Church in the Kingdom of England. This challenge to Papal supremacy resulted in a breach with the Catholic Church. By 1541, the Irish Parliament had agreed to the change in status of the country from that of a Lordship to that of Kingdom of Ireland.

Pre-Reformation bishops

Pre-Reformation Bishops of Cork and Cloyne [1]
FromUntilIncumbentNotes
14291469Jordan PurcellAppointed 15 June 1429; confirmed 6 January 1432; received possession of temporalities 25 September 1432; resigned after 18 April 1469.
14631477Gerald FitzGeraldAppointed before 3 February 1462; died circa 1477.
14721490William RocheAppointed 26 October 1472; resigned before April 1490.
14901492 Thaddeus McCarthy [2] Bishop-designate of Ross; appointed 21 April 1490; died 24 October 1492; beatified by Pope Leo XIII on 14 September 1896; also known as Tadhg Mac Cartaigh.
1499Patrick Cant, O.Cist.Abbot of Fermoy; appointed 15 February 1499, but annulled 26 June 1499.
14991520John fitzEdmund FitzGeraldAppointed 26 June 1499; died before 27 August 1520.
15231536John BennetAppointed 28 January 1523; died 1536.

Post-Reformation bishops

Church of Ireland succession

Church of Ireland Bishops of Cork and Cloyne [3]
FromUntilIncumbentNotes
15361557 Dominic Tirrey [A] Nominated by King Henry VIII 11 June 1536; letters patent 25 September 1536; probably swore the Oath of Supremacy at Clonmel early in 1539 [4] absolved of schism by Cardinal Pole 27 November 1556; died circa August 1557.
15571567 Roger Skiddy [B] Grant of Temporalities 2 November 1557 and confirmed by letters patent in 1562; consecrated 30 October 1562; appointed on a commission in 1564 to administer the Oath of Supremacy; [5] resigned 18 March 1567
15701571 Richard Dixon Nominated 17 May and letters patent 6 June 1570; deprived 8 November 1571
15721582/83 Matthew Sheyn Nominated 2 January and letters patent 29 May 1572; died 1582 or 1583
In 1583, the see combined with Ross and formed the united see of Cork, Cloyne and Ross

Roman Catholic succession

Roman Catholic Bishops of Cork and Cloyne [6] [7]
FromUntilIncumbentNotes
1540Lewis Macnamara, O.F.M.Appointed 24 September 1540, but not consecrated
15401556John O'HeyneAppointed 5 November 1540; died before 1556; also administered the Diocese of Elphin 1545-1556
15561557Dominic Tirrey [C] Appointed as the Church of Ireland bishop by King Henry VIII in 1536; absolved of schism by Cardinal Pole 27 November 1556; died circa August 1557
15571567Roger Skiddy [D] Granted by the order of Queen Mary 18 September 1557; said to have been consecrated papali ritu 30 October 1562, [8] although this statement has been called 'untenable'; [9] appointed on a commission in 1564 to administer the Oath of Supremacy; [9] resigned 1567; "he was not recognized by Rome. He is ... condemned ... because he was reappointed by Elizabeth on 31 July 1562 ... he certainly accepted the supremacy when he accepted his appointment from Elizabeth" [10]
15681574Nicholas LandesAppointed 27 February 1568; died circa 1574
15741579 Edmund Tanner Appointed 5 November 1574; died 4 June 1579
15801603Dermot McCragheAppointed 12 October 1580; died after 1603
appointed 1614James MiaghAppointed vicar apostolic of Cork and Cloyne by papal brief 3 September 1614
appointed 1621Robert MiaghAppointed vicar apostolic of Cork and Cloyne by papal brief 13 July 1621
16221646William TirryAppointed 24 January 1622; died March. 1646
16471662Robert BarryAppointed 8 April 1647; died 6 July 1662
16621676See vacant
16761693Peter CreaghAppointed 13 May 1676; translated to Dublin 9 March 1693;
From 1693 to 1747, the Roman Catholic bishops were also Apostolic Administrators of Ross
16931712 John Baptist Sleyne , O.S.A.Appointed 13 April 1693; resigned 22 January 1712; died 16 February 1712
17121726Donagh MacCarthyAppointed 16 July 1712; died March. 1726
17271747 Thaddeus MacCarthy Appointed 7 April 1727; died 14 August 1747
In 1747, the see was separated into the bishopric of Cork and the bishopric of Cloyne and Ross

Notes

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References

  1. Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1986). Handbook of British Chronology (Third ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 345. ISBN   0-521-56350-X.
  2. "Blessed Thaddeus McCarthy". Roman Catholic Diocese of Cloyne. Archived from the original on 11 September 2010. Retrieved 28 July 2009.
  3. Fryde, ibid., pp. 385-386.
  4. Bagwell, Richard (1885–90). Ireland Under the Tudors. 1. p. 305.
  5. Bolster, Evelyn (1982). A history of the Diocese of Cork : from the Reformation to the Penal Era. Cork. p. 59.
  6. Fryde, ibid., p. 422.
  7. "Bishops Through History". The Diocese Cork and Cloyne (Roman Catholic). Archived from the original on 17 April 2009. Retrieved 28 July 2009.
  8. Cotton, Henry (1849). Fasti Ecclesiae Hibernicae: The succession of the Prelates ... in Ireland, Volume 4, Appendix. Dublin. p. xxiii.
  9. 1 2 Bolster, ibid., p. 59
  10. Bolster, ibid., p. 60