Bishop of Cork, Cloyne and Ross

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The Bishop of Cork, Cloyne and Ross is the Church of Ireland Ordinary of the united Diocese of Cork, Cloyne and Ross in the Province of Dublin.

Cork (city) City in Munster, Ireland

Cork is a city in south-west Ireland, in the province of Munster, which had a population of 125,657 in 2016.

Cloyne Town in Munster, Ireland

Cloyne is a small town to the southeast of Midleton in eastern County Cork. It is also a see city of the Anglican Diocese of Cork, Cloyne and Ross, while also giving its name to a Roman Catholic diocese. St Colman's Cathedral in Cloyne is a cathedral church of the Church of Ireland while the Pro Cathedral of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Cloyne, Cobh Cathedral of Saint Colman, overlooks Cork Harbour.

Rosscarbery Town in Munster, Ireland

Rosscarbery is a town in County Cork, Ireland. The town is on a shallow estuary, which opens onto Rosscarbery Bay. Rosscarbery is in the Cork South-West constituency, which has three seats.

Contents

The current bishop is the Right Reverend Paul Colton BCL, DipTh, MPhil, LLM, PhD. He was consecrated bishop at Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin, on Thursday 25 March 1999; the Feast of the Annunciation. He was enthroned in St. Fin Barre's Cathedral, Cork on 24 April 1999, in St Colman's Cathedral, Cloyne on 13 May 1999, and in St. Fachtna's Cathedral, Ross on 28 May 1999. [1]

William Paul Colton, known as Paul Colton, is the Church of Ireland's Bishop of Cork, Cloyne and Ross. He is now perhaps best known for being the Bishop who officiated at the wedding of footballer David Beckham and Spice girl Victoria Adams on 4 July 1999 at the medieval Luttrellstown Castle on the outskirts of Dublin.

Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin Church in Ireland

Christ Church Cathedral, more formally The Cathedral of the Holy Trinity, is the cathedral of the United Dioceses of Dublin and Glendalough and the cathedral of the ecclesiastical province of the United Provinces of Dublin and Cashel in the (Anglican) Church of Ireland. It is situated in Dublin, Ireland, and is the elder of the capital city's two medieval cathedrals, the other being St Patrick's Cathedral.

Feast of the Annunciation

The Feast of the Annunciation, contemporarily the Solemnity of the Annunciation, also known as Lady Day, the Feast of the Incarnation, Conceptio Christi, commemorates the visit of the archangel Gabriel to the Virgin Mary, during which he informed her that she would be the mother of Jesus Christ, the Son of God. It is celebrated on 25 March each year. In the Roman Catholic Church, when 25 March falls during the Paschal Triduum, it is transferred forward to the first suitable day during Eastertide. In Eastern Orthodoxy and Eastern Catholicism, it is never transferred, even if it falls on Pascha (Easter). The concurrence of these two feasts is called Kyriopascha.

Succession

This bishop is successor to the Bishop of Cork (from 876), Bishop of Cloyne (from 887) and Bishop of Ross (from 1160, and distinct from the Scottish Bishop of Ross). They were combined to establish the Bishop of Cork and Ross (from 1583) and the current position Bishop of Cork, Cloyne and Ross (from 1835). [2]

Bishop of Ross (Scotland) Wikimedia list article

The Bishop of Ross was the ecclesiastical head of the Diocese of Ross, one of Scotland's 13 medieval bishoprics. The first recorded bishop appears in the late 7th century as a witness to Adomnán of Iona's Cáin Adomnáin. The bishopric was based at the settlement of Rosemarkie until the mid-13th century, afterwards being moved to nearby Fortrose and Fortrose Cathedral. As far as the evidence goes, this bishopric was the oldest of all bishoprics north of the Forth, and was perhaps the only Pictish bishopric until the 9th century. Indeed, the Cáin Adomnáin indicates that in the reign of Bruide mac Der Ilei, king of the Picts, the bishop of Rosemarkie was the only significant figure in Pictland other than the king. The bishopric is located conveniently close to the heartland of Fortriu, being just across the water from Moray.

List of bishops

Bishops of Cork, Cloyne and Ross
FromUntilIncumbentNotes
15831617 William Lyon Appointed Bishop of Ross in 1582; he was granted in commendam the united see of Cork and Cloyne November 1583; died 4 October 1617.
16181620 John Boyle Nominated 22 April 1618; letters patent 25 August 1618; died 10 July 1620.
16201638 Richard Boyle Nominated 23 August 1620; consecrated November 1620; translated to Tuam 30 May 1638; father of Michael Boyle.
16381660The see was divided into the bishopric of Cork and Ross and the bishopric of Cloyne. They were reunited in 1660.
16601663 Michael Boyle Nominated 6 August 1660; consecrated 27 January 1661; translated to Dublin 27 November 1663; son of Richard Boyle.
16631678 Edward Synge Translated from Limerick, Ardfert and Aghadoe; nominated 24 August 1663; letters patent 21 December 1663; died 22 December 1678.
16781835The see was divided again into the bishopric of Cork and Ross and the bishopric of Cloyne. Since 1835, they have remained united.
18351848 Samuel Kyle Bishop of Cork and Ross since 1831; became Bishop of Cork, Cloyne and Ross 14 September 1835; died 18 May 1848.
18481857 James Wilson Nominated 24 June 1848; consecrated 30 July 1848; died 5 January 1857.
18571862 William FitzGerald Nominated 27 January 1857; consecrated 8 March 1857; translated to Killaloe and Clonfert 3 February 1862.
18621878 John Gregg Nominated 15 January 1862; consecrated 16 February 1862; died 26 May 1878.
18781893 Robert Gregg Translated from Ossory, Ferns and Leighlin; elected 27 June 1878; confirmed 4 July 1878; translated to Armagh 14 December 1893.
18931912 Edward Meade Elected 5 December 1893; consecrated 6 January 1894; died 12 October 1912.
19121933 Charles Dowse Translated from Killaloe and Clonfert; elected 22 November 1912; confirmed 23 December 1912; resigned 15 September 1933; died 13 January 1934.
19331938 William Edward Flewett Elected 6 October 1933; consecrated 30 November 1933; died 5 August 1938.
19381952 Robert Thomas Hearn Elected 19 October 1938; consecrated 13 November 1938; died 14 July 1952.
19521956 George Otto Simms Elected 2 October 1952; consecrated 28 October 1952; translated to Dublin 11 December 1956.
19571978 Richard Perdue Translated from Killaloe and Clonfert; elected 31 January 1957; confirmed 19 February 1957; resigned 20 May 1978.
19781987 Samuel Poyntz Elected 20 June 1978; consecrated 17 September 1978; translated to Connor.
19881998 Robert Warke Elected 1988; retired 1998.
1999present Paul Colton [1] Elected 29 January 1999; consecrated 25 March 1999.
Source(s): [3]

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References

  1. 1 2 Biography: Paul Colton Archived 27 December 2008 at the Wayback Machine .. Retrieved on 27 December 2008.
  2. "The Episcopal Succession". Cork, Cloyne and Ross. The diocese. Archived from the original on 4 August 2008. Retrieved 11 June 2008.
  3. Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1986). Handbook of British Chronology (Third Edition, revised ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 386. ISBN   0-521-56350-X.