Bishop of Warrington

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The Bishop of Warrington is an episcopal title used by a suffragan bishop of the Church of England Diocese of Liverpool, in the Province of York, England. [1] The title takes its name after the town of Warrington in Cheshire; the current bishop's official residence is in Eccleston Park, St Helens.

Contents


List of bishops of Warrington

Bishops of Warrington
FromUntilIncumbentNotes
19181920 Linton Smith (1869–1950). Translated to Hereford on 5 October 1920. [2]
19201927 Edwin Kempson (1862–1931)
19271946 Herbert Gresford Jones (1870–1958)
19461960 Charles Claxton (1903–1992). Translated to Blackburn on 18 July 1960. [3]
19601969 Laurie Brown (1907–1994). Translated to Birmingham on 9 December 1969. [3]
19701975 John Bickersteth (b. 1921). Translated to Bath and Wells on 12 December 1975. [3]
19761996 Michael Henshall (19282017)
19962000 John Packer (b. 1946). Consecrated in November 1996 at York Minster and installed at Liverpool Cathedral on 21 November 1996; [4] translated to Ripon and Leeds
20002009 David Jennings (b. 1944). Nominated on 11 July 2000; [5] Resigned on 30 September 2009. [6]
20092018 Richard Blackburn (b. 1952) Formerly Archdeacon of Sheffield and Rotherham
2018present Bev Mason (b. 1960) consecrated 18 October 2018 [7]
Source(s): [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 Crockford's Clerical Directory (100th ed.). London: Church House Publishing. 2007. p. 949. ISBN   978-0-7151-1030-0.
  2. Fryde et al. 1986, Handbook of British Chronology, p. 252.
  3. 1 2 3 Fryde et al. 1986, Handbook of British Chronology, p. 230.
  4. Bishop Ordained [ permanent dead link ]. Retrieved on 28 August 2009.
  5. Suffragan See of Warrington. Number10. Dated 11 July 2000.
  6. Suffragan See of Warrington Archived 2009-08-30 at the Wayback Machine . Number10. Dated 27 August 2009.
  7. "Downing Street has announced that the next Bishop of Warrington will be the Venerable Beverley Mason, Archdeacon of Richmond and Craven in the Diocese of Leeds". Diocese Of Liverpool. 24 July 2018. Retrieved 24 July 2018.

Bibliography