Bishop of Hull

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The Bishop of Hull is an episcopal title used by a suffragan bishop of the Church of England Diocese of York, England. [1] The suffragan bishop, along with the Bishop of Selby and the Bishop of Whitby, assists the Archbishop of York in overseeing the diocese.

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The title takes its name after the city of Kingston upon Hull and was first created under the Suffragan Bishops Act 1534. [2] Today, the Bishop of Hull is responsible for the Archdeaconry of the East Riding.

List of bishops

Bishops of Hull
FromUntilIncumbentNotes
15381559 Robert Pursglove Consecrated on 29 December 1538; deprived 1559.
15591891in abeyance
18911910 Richard Blunt
19101913 John Augustine Kempthorne [3] Translated to Lichfield
19131929 Francis Gurdon
19291931no appointment; though Heywood exercised oversight as Assistant Bishop [4]
19311934 Bernard Heywood Previously Assistant Bishop of York (overseeing the East Riding, effectively the same role); translated to Ely
19341957 Henry Vodden
19571965 George Townley
19651977 Hubert Higgs
19771981 Geoffrey Paul Translated to Bradford
19811994 Donald Snelgrove
19941998 James Jones Translated to Liverpool
199817 October 2014 Richard Frith Translated to Hereford
3 July 20152022 Alison White [5] Consecrated 3 July 2015. Retired [6] 25 February 2022. [7]
Sep 2022 [8] present Eleanor Sanderson Translated 22 September 2022. [9]
Source(s): [1] [2]

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References

  1. 1 2 Crockford's Clerical Directory (100th ed.). London: Church House Publishing. 2007. p. 947. ISBN   978-0-7151-1030-0.
  2. 1 2 Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1986). Handbook of British Chronology (Third Edition, revised ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 287. ISBN   0-521-56350-X.
  3. "Historical Pictures". All Saints' Church in Hessle. Archived from the original on 16 July 2011. Retrieved 18 December 2008.
  4. "New Bishop of Hull" . Church Times . No. 3575. 31 July 1931. p. 135. ISSN   0009-658X . Retrieved 13 March 2020 via UK Press Online archives.
  5. "New Bishop of Hull". Diocese of York. Retrieved 25 March 2015.
  6. ""A shining presence in the church..." ~ Bishop of Hull to retire in February 2022". Diocese of York. Archived from the original on 7 September 2021. Retrieved 24 November 2021.
  7. "Prayer Diary, February 2022" (PDF). Diocese of York. Retrieved 18 January 2022.
  8. "No. 63829". The London Gazette (invalid |supp= (help)). 30 September 2022. p. 18518.
  9. "Prayer and welcome from around the globe for Bishop Eleanor". Diocese of York. 27 September 2022. Archived from the original on 29 September 2022. Retrieved 29 September 2022.