Bishop of Hertford

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The Bishop of Hertford is an episcopal title used by a suffragan bishop of the Church of England Diocese of St Albans, in the Province of Canterbury, England. [1] The suffragan See was created by Order in Council of 5 July 1889, but remained dormant until first filled in December 1967. [2] The title takes its name after Hertford, the county town of Hertfordshire. The suffragan Bishop of Hertford, along with the suffragan Bishop of Bedford, assists the diocesan Bishop of St Albans in overseeing the diocese.

Contents

List of bishops

Bishops of Hertford
FromUntilIncumbentNotes
18891967in abeyance
19671971 John Trillo (1915–1992). Translated from Bedford; later to Chelmsford
19711974 Victor Whitsey (1916–1987). Translated to Chester
19741981 Peter Mumford (1922–1992). Translated to Truro
19821989 Kenneth Pillar (1924–2011)
19902001 Robin Smith (b. 1936)
2001Sept 2010 Christopher Foster [3] (b. 1953). Translated to Portsmouth
201023 July 2014 Paul Bayes (b. 1954) Previously National Mission and Evangelism Adviser; [4] translated to Liverpool
16 May 201529 June 2022 Michael Beasley (b. 1968) Translated to Bath & Wells. [5]
2 Feb 2023 (announced) Jane Mainwaring (b. 1970) previously Archdeacon of St Albans
Source(s): [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 Crockford's Clerical Directory (100th ed.). London: Church House Publishing. 2007. p. 947. ISBN   978-0-7151-1030-0.
  2. Diocese of St Albans – A History of the Sees of Hertford and Bedford Archived August 21, 2014, at the Wayback Machine (Accessed 20 August 2014)
  3. Biographies of the Bishops of St Albans, Bedford and Hertford Archived November 1, 2007, at the Wayback Machine . Retrieved on 16 June 2008.
  4. Number 10 — Suffragan See of Hertford
  5. Diocese of Bath & Wells [@BathWells] (29 June 2022). "Bishop Michael Beasley has officially become the 80th Bishop of Bath and Wells..." (Tweet). Archived from the original on 2 October 2022. Retrieved 2 October 2022 via Twitter.