Bishop of Wolverhampton

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The Bishop of Wolverhampton is an episcopal title used by a suffragan bishop of the Church of England Diocese of Lichfield, in the Province of Canterbury, England. The title takes its name after the city of Wolverhampton in the West Midlands; [1] [2] the See was erected under the Suffragans Nomination Act 1888 by Order in Council dated 6 February 1979. [3] The Bishop of Wolverhampton has particular episcopal oversight of the parishes in the Archdeaconries of Lichfield and Walsall. The bishops suffragan of Wolverhampton have been area bishops since the Lichfield area scheme was erected in 1992. [4]

Contents

List of bishops

Bishops of Wolverhampton
FromUntilIncumbentNotes
19791985 Barry Rogerson Translated to Bristol
19851993 Christopher Mayfield First area bishop from 1992; translated to Manchester
19932007 Michael Bourke
2007present Clive Gregory
Source(s): [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 Crockford's Clerical Directory (100th ed.). London: Church House Publishing. 2007. p. 949. ISBN   978-0-7151-1030-0.
  2. Diocesan Web site
  3. "No. 47765". The London Gazette . 8 February 1979. p. 1737.
  4. "4: The Dioceses Commission, 1978–2002" (PDF). Church of England. Archived from the original (PDF) on 1 April 2016. Retrieved 23 April 2013.