Bishop of Hulme

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The Bishop of Hulme was an episcopal title used by a suffragan bishop of the Church of England Diocese of Manchester, in the Province of York, England. [1] The See was created by Order in Council on 11 October 1923 (under the Suffragans Nomination Act 1888) [2] and took its name after Hulme, an area of the city of Manchester.

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Following the retirement of Stephen Lowe, the last suffragan Bishop of Hulme, in July 2009, [3] [4] the post was axed and its duties were divided between the remaining suffragan bishops of Bolton and of Middleton, who assist the diocesan Bishop of Manchester in overseeing the diocese. [5]

List of bishops

Bishops of Hulme
FromUntilIncumbentNotes
19241930 John Charles Hill
19301945 Thomas Sherwood Jones
19451953 Hugh Hornby Father of Richard Hornby
19531975 Kenneth Ramsey
19751984 David Galliford Translated to Bolton
19841999 Colin Scott
19992009 Stephen Lowe
Office abolished in 2009
Source(s): [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 Crockford's Clerical Directory (100th ed.). London: Church House Publishing. 2007. p. 947. ISBN   978-0-7151-1030-0.
  2. "No. 32871". The London Gazette (Supplement). 16 October 1923. p. 6962.
  3. Bishop Stephen Lowe to retire The Church of England: Diocese of Manchester. Dated 18 July 2009.
  4. Urban bishop retires. The Church of England: Diocese of Manchester. Dated 20 July 2009.
  5. "Bishop of Hulme post to be axed". BBC News. 30 June 2009.