Diocese of Blackburn

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Coordinates: 53°45′00″N2°29′06″W / 53.750°N 2.485°W / 53.750; -2.485

Contents

Diocese of Blackburn
Dio Blackburn arms.png
Location
Ecclesiastical province York
Archdeaconries Blackburn, Lancaster
Statistics
Parishes211
Churches280
Information
Cathedral Blackburn Cathedral
Current leadership
Bishop Julian Henderson, Bishop of Blackburn
Suffragans Philip North, Bishop of Burnley
Jill Duff, Bishop of Lancaster
Archdeacons Mark Ireland, Archdeacon of Blackburn
David Picken, Archdeacon of Lancaster
Website
blackburn.anglican.org

The Diocese of Blackburn is a Church of England diocese, covering much of Lancashire, created on 12 November 1926 [1] from part of the Diocese of Manchester. The diocese includes the towns of Blackburn, Blackpool and Burnley, the cities of Lancaster and Preston, as well as a large part of the Ribble Valley. The cathedral is Blackburn Cathedral and the current Bishop of Blackburn is Julian Henderson. [2]

The diocesan retreat and conference centre is located at Whalley Abbey in the Ribble Valley, alongside the ruins of the 14th-century Cistercian monastery, dissolved in 1537. The abbey was in private possession until 1923 and has been in the possession of the Diocese of Blackburn since 1926.

Bishops

Alongside the diocesan Bishop of Blackburn, the diocese has two suffragan bishops: Jill Duff, Bishop suffragan of Lancaster, consecrated in 2018; and Philip North, Bishop suffragan of Burnley, appointed in 2015.

Alternative episcopal oversight (for parishes in the diocese which reject the ministry of priests who are women) is provided by Philip North, Bishop suffragan of Burnley.

Archdeaconries and deaneries

Diocese Archdeaconries Rural Deaneries
Diocese of Blackburn Archdeaconry of Blackburn Deanery of Accrington
Deanery of Blackburn with Darwen
Deanery of Burnley
Deanery of Chorley
Deanery of Leyland
Deanery of Pendle
Deanery of Whalley
Archdeaconry of Lancaster Deanery of Blackpool
Deanery of Garstang
Deanery of Kirkham
Deanery of Lancaster and Morecambe
Deanery of Poulton
Deanery of Preston
Deanery of Tunstall

Churches within the diocese

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References

  1. "No. 33220". The London Gazette . 12 November 1926. p. 7321.
  2. "Diocese of Blackburn" (Press release). Number10.gov.uk. 1 March 2013. Retrieved 1 March 2013.
  3. "Michael Edwin Vickers" . Crockford's Clerical Directory (online ed.). Church House Publishing . Retrieved 18 June 2016.
  4. "Cyril Guy Ashton" . Crockford's Clerical Directory (online ed.). Church House Publishing . Retrieved 18 June 2016.
  5. "David Michael Hope" . Crockford's Clerical Directory (online ed.). Church House Publishing . Retrieved 18 June 2016.