Diocese of Brechin (Episcopal)

Last updated

Diocese of Brechin
Crest-brechin.png
Location
Ecclesiastical province Scotland
Statistics
Congregations29
Information
Cathedral St Paul's Cathedral, Dundee
Current leadership
Bishop Andrew Swift, Bishop of Brechin
Map
Diocese of Brechin.png
Map showing Brechin Diocese within Scotland
Website
thedioceseofbrechin.org

The Diocese of Brechin is in the east of Scotland, and is the smallest of the seven dioceses of the Scottish Episcopal Church. It covers the historic counties of Angus and Kincardineshire. It stretches from Muchalls in the north east down to Dundee in the south, and across to Glencarse in the south west. The cathedral and administrative centre is St Paul’s Cathedral in Dundee. The diocese continues to be named after its mediaeval centre of Brechin.

Diocese Christian district or see under the supervision of a bishop

The word diocese is derived from the Greek term dioikesis (διοίκησις) meaning "administration". Today, when used in an ecclesiastical sense, it refers to the ecclesiastical district under the jurisdiction of a bishop. Sometimes it is also called bishopric.

The seven dioceses of the Scottish Episcopal Church make up the ecclesiastical province of the Anglican Communion in Scotland. The church has, since the 18th century, held an identity distinct from that of the Presbyterian-aligned Church of Scotland.

Shires of Scotland historic administrative and geographical division of Scotland

The counties or shires of Scotland are geographic subdivisions of Scotland established in the Middle Ages. Originally established for judicial purposes, from the 17th century they started to be used for local administration purposes as well. The areas used for judicial functions (sheriffdoms) came to diverge from the shires, which ceased to be used for local government purposes after 1975 under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973.

Contents

The diocese is thought to have been founded in 1153 by Bishop Samson. The diocese had a continuous line of bishops leading through the Reformation, when Donald Campbell (1557) and John Sinclair (1565) were elected Bishops of Brechin, but not consecrated; the line was continued later through Andrew Lamb. In 1566, Alexander Campbell was appointed as titular bishop. The line continued in proper form among Episcopalians with Andrew Lamb in 1610. From 1695 until 1709, the diocese was united with the Diocese of Edinburgh, with the latter's bishop, Alexander Rose, being also Bishop of Brechin. The line of independent bishops of Brechin restarted with John Falconar in 1709, and has continued to the present day. Following the resignation and death of the Right Reverend Dr John Mantle, in 2010, Dr Nigel Peyton was appointed Bishop of Brechin in May 2011. Dr Peyton was chosen ahead of four other candidates including Dr Alison Peden. [1]

Scottish Reformation religious and political movement that established the Church of Scotland

The Scottish Reformation was the process by which Scotland broke with the Papacy and developed a predominantly Calvinist national Kirk (church), which was strongly Presbyterian in outlook. It was part of the wider European Protestant Reformation that took place from the sixteenth century.

Bishop of Brechin Wikimedia list article

The Bishop of Brechin is the ecclesiastical head of the Diocese of Brechin or Angus, based at Dundee. Brechin Cathedral, Brechin is a parish church of the established (presbyterian) Church of Scotland. The diocese had a long-established Gaelic monastic community which survived into the 13th century. The clerical establishment may very well have traced their earlier origins from Abernethy. During the Scottish Reformation, the Presbyterian Church of Scotland gained control of the heritage and jurisdiction of the bishopric. However, the line of bishops has continued to this day, according to ancient models of consecration, in the Scottish Episcopal Church.

A titular bishop in various churches is a bishop who is not in charge of a diocese. By definition, a bishop is an "overseer" of a community of the faithful, so when a priest is ordained a bishop, the tradition of the Roman Catholic and Orthodox churches is that he be ordained for a specific place. There are more bishops than there are functioning dioceses. Therefore, a priest appointed not to head a diocese as its diocesan bishop but to be an auxiliary bishop, a papal diplomat, or an official of the Roman Curia is appointed to a titular see.

The Diocese of Brechin is twinned with the Episcopal Diocese of Iowa (Iowa, United States) and with the Anglican Diocese of Swaziland (Swaziland).

Episcopal Diocese of Iowa

The Episcopal Diocese of Iowa is the diocese of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America which covers all of Iowa. It is in Province VI. Its offices are in Des Moines, and it has two cathedrals: the Cathedral Church of St. Paul in Des Moines and Trinity Cathedral in Davenport.

Iowa U.S. state in the United States

Iowa is a state in the Midwestern United States, bordered by the Mississippi River to the east and the Missouri River and Big Sioux River to the west. It is bordered by six states: Wisconsin to the northeast, Illinois to the east, Missouri to the south, Nebraska to the west, South Dakota to the northwest, and Minnesota to the north.

The manuscript records of the Diocese of Brechin are held by University of Dundee Archive Services. [2] The archive collections include the administrative records of the diocese, records of individual churches, and the correspondence of Alexander Penrose Forbes and George Frederick Boyle. [3]

University of Dundee public research university in Dundee, Scotland

The University of Dundee is a public research university in Dundee, Scotland. Founded in 1881 the institution was, for most of its early existence, a constituent college of the University of St Andrews alongside United College and St Mary's College located in the town of St Andrews itself. Following significant expansion, the University of Dundee gained independent university status in 1967 while retaining much of its ancient heritage and governance structure.

Area and population

The diocese covers the historic counties of Kincardineshire (except the Banchory and Lower Deeside areas) (population 31,000), Angus (except the Forfar and Kirriemuir areas) (population 233,500), and the Glencarse area of Perthshire (population 9,000).

Kincardineshire Historic county in Scotland

Kincardineshire, also known as the Mearns, is a historic county, registration county and lieutenancy area on the coast of northeast Scotland. It is bounded by Aberdeenshire on the north and west, and by Angus on the south.

Banchory town (burgh) in Aberdeenshire, Scotland

Banchory is a burgh or town in Aberdeenshire, Scotland. It is about 18 miles (29 km) west of Aberdeen, near where the Feugh River meets the River Dee.

Lower Deeside is a region along the River Dee in Aberdeenshire, Scotland. The boundaries of this area are subject to interpretation, since the usage has altered through historic times; however, the area is generally associated with the communities of Durris, Maryculter and Banchory-Devenick in the historic district of Kincardineshire.

This total population of approximately 273,500 gives the diocese a ratio of one priest to every 19,500 inhabitants and one church to every 10,900 inhabitants.

List of churches

The diocese has 12 stipendiary clergy and 25 active churches.

BeneficeChurchLinkFounded (building)Stipendiary clergy
Muchalls (St Ternan) [4] St Ternan, Muchalls c. 1689 (1831)0
Stonehaven (St James) [5] St James, Stonehaven1715 (1877)
Catterline (St Philip) [6] St Philip, Catterline 1843 (1848)
Drumlithie (St John the Baptist) [7] St John the Baptist, Drumlithie18631
Drumtochty (St Palladius) [8] St Palladius, Drumtochty1885
Fasque (St Andrew) [9] St Andrew, Fasque1846
Laurencekirk (St Laurence) [10] St Laurence, Laurencekirk1871
Inverbervie (St David of Scotland) [11] St David of Scotland, Inverbervie 0
Montrose (St Mary and St Peter) [12] SS Mary & Peter, Montrose1724 (1858)
Brechin (St Andrew) [13] St Andrew, Brechin pre-1870 (1888)0
Tarfside (St Drostan) [14] St Drostan, Tarfside c. 1689 (1879)0
Arbroath (St Mary) [15] St Mary the Virgin, Arbroath 1694 (1854)1
Auchmithie (St Peter) [16] St Peter, Auchmithie1885
Carnoustie (Holy Rood) [17] Holy Rood, Carnoustie 18811
Monifieth (Holy Trinity) [18] Holy Trinity, Monifieth 19091
Dundee (Cathedral of St Paul) [19] [20] St Paul's Cathedral, Dundee pre-1847 (1855)1
Dundee (St Mary Magdalene) [21] St Mary Magdalene, Dundee 1854 (1952)1
Dundee (St Salvador) [22] St Salvador, Dundee 1859 (1868)1
Dundee (St Margaret) [23] St Margaret, Dundee1861 (1888)0
Dundee (St Ninian) [24] St Ninian, Dundee 19382
Broughty Ferry (St Mary) [25] St Mary, Broughty Ferry 1848 (1858)2
Dundee (St Martin) [26] St Martin, Dundee 1904 (1972)
Dundee (St John the Baptist) [27] St John the Baptist, Dundee (closed?)1886
Dundee (St Luke) [28] St Luke, Dundee 19011
Invergowrie (All Souls) [29] All Souls, Invergowrie 18960
Glencarse (All Saints) [30] All Saints, Glencarse (C18th) C18th (1878)0

Closed churches in the diocese

ChurchFoundedClosed
Holy Cross, Dundee [31] 19561966
St Columba, Dundee [32] 18971939
Holy Trinity Mission, Dundee [32] 18731944
All Saints Mission, Dundee [32] 18961944
St Roque, Dundee [32] 18961956

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References

  1. Bowman, Maura (19 May 2011). "Dr Nigel Peyton appointed Bishop of Brechin". The Courier. Archived from the original on 21 May 2011. Retrieved 7 October 2011.
  2. "University of Dundee Archive Services Online Catalogue". University of Dundee. Archived from the original on 1 May 2015. Retrieved 18 February 2015.
  3. "Archive Services Online Catalogue Collection Summaries". University of Dundee. Archived from the original on 18 February 2015. Retrieved 18 February 2015.
  4. "The Benefice of Muchalls (St Ternan)". www.crockford.org.uk. Retrieved 15 September 2018.
  5. "The Benefice of Stonehaven (St James)". www.crockford.org.uk. Retrieved 15 September 2018.
  6. "The Benefice of Catterline (St Philip)". www.crockford.org.uk. Retrieved 15 September 2018.
  7. "The Benefice of Drumlithie (St John the Baptist)". www.crockford.org.uk. Retrieved 15 September 2018.
  8. "The Benefice of Drumtochty (St Palladius)". www.crockford.org.uk. Retrieved 15 September 2018.
  9. "The Benefice of Fasque (St Andrew)". www.crockford.org.uk. Retrieved 15 September 2018.
  10. "The Benefice of Laurencekirk (St Laurence)". www.crockford.org.uk. Retrieved 15 September 2018.
  11. "The Benefice of Inverbervie (St David of Scotland)". www.crockford.org.uk. Retrieved 15 September 2018.
  12. "The Benefice of Montrose (St Mary and St Peter)". www.crockford.org.uk. Retrieved 15 September 2018.
  13. "The Benefice of Brechin (St Andrew)". www.crockford.org.uk. Retrieved 15 September 2018.
  14. "The Benefice of Tarfside (St Drostan)". www.crockford.org.uk. Retrieved 15 September 2018.
  15. "The Benefice of Arbroath (St Mary)". www.crockford.org.uk. Retrieved 15 September 2018.
  16. "The Benefice of Auchmithie (St Peter)". www.crockford.org.uk. Retrieved 15 September 2018.
  17. "The Benefice of Carnoustie (Holy Rood)". www.crockford.org.uk. Retrieved 15 September 2018.
  18. "The Benefice of Monifieth (Holy Trinity)". www.crockford.org.uk. Retrieved 15 September 2018.
  19. "Brechin Cathedral". www.crockford.org.uk. Retrieved 15 September 2018.
  20. "The Benefice of Dundee (Cathedral of St Paul)". www.crockford.org.uk. Retrieved 14 October 2018.
  21. "The Benefice of Dundee (St Mary Magdalene)". www.crockford.org.uk. Retrieved 15 September 2018.
  22. "The Benefice of Dundee (St Salvador)". www.crockford.org.uk. Retrieved 15 September 2018.
  23. "The Benefice of Dundee (St Margaret)". www.crockford.org.uk. Retrieved 15 September 2018.
  24. "The Benefice of Dundee (St Ninian)". www.crockford.org.uk. Retrieved 15 September 2018.
  25. "The Benefice of Broughty Ferry (St Mary)". www.crockford.org.uk. Retrieved 15 September 2018.
  26. "The Benefice of Dundee (St Martin)". www.crockford.org.uk. Retrieved 15 September 2018.
  27. "The Benefice of Dundee (St John the Baptist)". www.crockford.org.uk. Retrieved 14 October 2018.
  28. "The Benefice of Dundee (St Luke)". www.crockford.org.uk. Retrieved 15 September 2018.
  29. "The Benefice of Invergowrie (All Souls)". www.crockford.org.uk. Retrieved 15 September 2018.
  30. "The Benefice of Glencarse (All Saints)". www.crockford.org.uk. Retrieved 15 September 2018.
  31. "The Benefice of Dundee (Holy Cross)". www.crockford.org.uk. Retrieved 14 October 2018.
  32. 1 2 3 4 Brechin, The Diocese of. "History of the Diocese of Brechin | The Diocese of Brechin". www.thedioceseofbrechin.org. Retrieved 14 October 2018.

Coordinates: 56°27′34″N2°58′20″W / 56.45944°N 2.97222°W / 56.45944; -2.97222

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

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