Garstang

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Garstang
Garstang Cross and Market Place 239-25.jpg
Market cross in Market Place
Location map United Kingdom Borough of Wyre.svg
Red pog.svg
Garstang
Shown within Wyre Borough
Lancashire UK location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Garstang
Location within Lancashire
Population4,268 (2011 Census) [1]
OS grid reference SD495455
  London 199 miles (322 km) SE
Civil parish
  • Garstang
District
Shire county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town PRESTON
Postcode district PR3
Dialling code 01995
Police Lancashire
Fire Lancashire
Ambulance North West
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Lancashire
53°54′11″N2°46′01″W / 53.903°N 2.767°W / 53.903; -2.767 Coordinates: 53°54′11″N2°46′01″W / 53.903°N 2.767°W / 53.903; -2.767
A view of Garstang Town Hall from the High Street Garstang Town Hall from High Street 239-1.jpg
A view of Garstang Town Hall from the High Street
Market cross and Royal Oak Hotel Garstang Cross and Royal Oak 239-20.jpg
Market cross and Royal Oak Hotel

Garstang is an ancient market town and civil parish within the Wyre borough of Lancashire, England. It is 10 miles (16 km) north of the city of Preston and the same distance south of Lancaster.

Contents

In 2011, the parish had a total resident population of 4,268; [1] the larger Garstang Built-up Area, which includes the adjoining settlements of Bonds and Cabus, had population of 6,779. [2] Garstang is famous for being the world's first ever Fairtrade Town.

Etymology

Garstang is mentioned in the Domesday Book as Cherestanc in 1086. [3] [4] Later recordings of the name include Geresteng, Gairstang in 1195; Grestein, 1204; Gayrestan, 1236; Gayerstang, 1246; Gayrstang, 1274; Gayrestang, 1292. [5] [6] [7]

The original spelling of Garstang has several interpretations: "'gore by the boundary pole", "spear post", "triangular piece of land", "common land" or "meadowland". Possibly signifying the site of a meeting-space. The Old Norse derivation being 'geiri', a gore, from 'geirr', with 'stang' or 'stong', meaning "pole" or "boundary marker". Or the Saxon derivation 'Gaerstung'. It is probable that the historic market cross is this same site. [4] [8] [9]

History

Early history

Greenhalgh Castle Greenhalgh Castle, Garstang.jpg
Greenhalgh Castle

A brief but comprehensive history of the parish, including the parish church of St Helen in Churchtown and Greenhalgh Castle, can be found in "The Parish of Garstang", A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 7. [10] St. John Plessington was born at Dimples Hall, which is just outside the town.

Garstang was once served by Garstang and Catterall railway station which closed in 1969, and Garstang Town railway station which closed to passengers in 1930.

The town is overlooked by the ruined remains of Greenhalgh Castle, built in 1490 by Thomas Stanley, 1st Earl of Derby. Garstang Town Hall was completed in 1764. [11]

Modern history

Garstang's traditional market day on Thursdays dates back to the early-1300s and stretches the length of street. The Market Cross at the top of the High Street one of the most familiar landmarks in the area. [9]

The town celebrates an arts festival and an agricultural show (which has been continued for 200 years) every year in August.

In April 2000, Garstang declared itself "the world's first Fairtrade Town", influencing many other towns, cities and counties around the United Kingdom to work towards the same goal. [12] The Fairtrade Town status was renewed by the Fairtrade Foundation on 13 August 2003.

In 2011, a 518-foot (158 m) wind turbine, the UK's largest, was built in the town to provide power for Dewlay; a local factory producing the award-winning Garstang Blue cheese. [13] [14]

The local newspaper, the Garstang Courier, is available on tape free of charge to blind and partially-sighted people from Galloway's Society for the Blind.

Following success in winning the Small Country Town category in the 2002 Britain in Bloom Awards, Garstang won the Small Town category in the 2005, 2006 [15] and 2010 and was invited to the champion of champions[ clarification needed ] in 2010 also.

Local primary schools are Garstang Community Primary School, Garstang St Thomas Church of England School and SS Mary and Michael Catholic School. The local secondary school is Garstang Community Academy which does not offer sixth form courses; pupils have to travel to Lancaster, Preston or Blackpool and further to sit A-Level courses.

The town has seven public houses: The Farmers Arms, the Crown, the Eagle and Child, the King's Arms, the Royal Oak Hotel, the Wheatsheaf, Th'Owd Tithe Barn, with the Bellflower (formerly the Flag) in Nateby and Crofters Tavern in Cabus. It has three restaurants: Pipers, Ken Ma and the Great Season, the latter two being Chinese restaurants. There is also a golf club and Country Hotel and the Crofter's Hotel, on the main A6 road.

Garstang is referenced in episode 5 of the first series of the comedy Phoenix Nights . Brian Potter (played by Peter Kay) said "What have you called us? What have you called the best cabaret lounge this side of Garstang?" in reference to an alternative comedy night being run at his fictional club.

The town is served by the Anglican church of St Thomas and the Catholic church of St Mary and St Michael (just outside the town's boundaries in Bonds). Until 1881, Garstang's official parish church was St Helen's, 2 miles (3 km) away in Churchtown.

Governance

From a very early time, Garstang lay within the Amounderness Hundred of Lancashire. From 1894 until 1974 Garstang formed its own local government district in the administrative county of Lancashire; "Garstang Rural District", [16] which extended beyond the current civil parish boundaries, including villages such as Pilling.

Since 1974, Garstang has formed part of the Wyre borough of Lancashire, although it retains an elected Town Council with limited jurisdiction. The borough ward has three councillors, including Lady Dulcie Atkins, wife of former MEP Sir Robert Atkins. [17]

The population of the ward at the 2011 Census was 4,852. [18]

Geography

Lying on the River Wyre, River Calder and the Lancaster Canal, Garstang is situated close to the A6 road, the M6 motorway, and the West Coast Main Line, between Lancaster and Preston. It lies on the eastern edge of the Fylde, and the Forest of Bowland is not far to the east.

Garstang and the nearby villages of Bonds, Bowgreave, Catterall and Western Claughton-On-Brock form an almost continuous built-up area, bypassed by the A6 road in 1928 [19] (incorrectly given as 1926 in [20] ). Other nearby villages not bypassed by the A6 road include: Brock, Bilsborrow, Cabus and Churchtown form another, much larger, continuous built-up area which includes Garstang in the centre.

Sport

Garstang F.C. are a non-league football club and the local team within the village. Founded in 1885, they play in the North West Counties League, having won the West Lanchashire League Premier League and Richardson Cup double in 2018.

People

The following people have lived, or were born, in Garstang:

See also

Related Research Articles

Borough of Wyre Borough in England

Wyre is a local government district with borough status in Lancashire, England. The population of the non-metropolitan district at the 2011 census was 107,749. The district borders the unitary authority of Blackpool as well as the districts of Lancaster, Ribble Valley, Fylde and Preston. The council is based in Poulton-le-Fylde.

Poulton-le-Fylde Human settlement in England

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River Wyre River in Lancashire, England

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Lancaster and Wyre (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1997–2010

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Kirkland, Lancashire Human settlement in England

Kirkland is a civil parish, located on the banks of the River Wyre, midway between Preston and Lancaster, in the English county of Lancashire. It is also the historic name of what is now the village of Churchtown, within the parish. It is part of the Wyre district. In 2001 the parish had a population of 343, decreasing to 314 at the 2011 census.

Hambleton, Lancashire Human settlement in England

Hambleton is a village and civil parish in the English county of Lancashire. It is situated on a coastal plain called the Fylde and in an area east of the River Wyre known locally as Over Wyre. Hambleton lies approximately 3 miles (4.8 km) north-east of its post town, Poulton-le-Fylde, and about 7 miles (11 km) north-east of the seaside resort of Blackpool. In the 2001 United Kingdom census, the parish had a population of 2,678, increasing to 2,744 at the 2011 census.

Garstang and Catterall railway station Disused station in Lancashire, England

Garstang and Catterall railway station served as the interchange between the Garstang and Knot-End Railway and the London and North Western Railway, in Lancashire, England. The station was in the parish of Barnacre-with-Bonds, close to the village of Catterall, adjacent to the Lancaster Canal, and opposite the Kenlis Arms Pub.

Pilling Human settlement in England

Pilling is a village and civil parish within the Wyre borough of Lancashire, England. It is 6.5 miles (10.5 km) north-northeast of Poulton-le-Fylde, 9.4 miles (15.1 km) south-southwest of Lancaster and 14.5 miles (23.3 km) northwest of Preston, in a part of the Fylde known as Over Wyre.

Catterall Human settlement in England

Catterall is a village and civil parish in the borough of Wyre, Lancashire, England. Historically in the Amounderness Hundred, it is situated on the A6 between Lancaster and Preston, a short distance from the town of Garstang, and Myerscough College. The rivers Wyre, Calder and Brock run through the parish and in places form the parish boundary.

Claughton, Wyre English village and parish also known as Claughton-on-Brock

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Stalmine-with-Staynall Parish in Wyre Borough, Lancashire, England

Stalmine-with-Staynall is a civil parish within the Wyre borough of Lancashire, England, in a part of the Fylde known as Over Wyre. The parish contains the village of Stalmine and the hamlets of Staynall and Wardley. The civil parish had a population of 1,486 at the 2011 Census, of which 1,087 lived in Stalmine village.

Great Eccleston Human settlement in England

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Bonds, Lancashire Human settlement in England

Bonds is a village in Lancashire, England. It lies immediately south of Garstang town centre, on the opposite bank of the River Wyre. It is bounded by the Lancaster Canal to the south and west. Garstang, Bonds, Bowgreave and Catterall form an almost continuous built-up area, which was bypassed by the A6 road in 1928.. While it is often regarded as a de facto suburb of Garstang, Bonds forms part of a different civil parish: Barnacre-with-Bonds.

Cabus Human settlement in England

Cabus is a village and civil parish in Lancashire, England. It lies 12 miles north of Preston, 9 miles south of Lancaster and 16 miles north east of Blackpool.

A586 road

The A586 is a road in England, which runs from Garstang to Blackpool, in Lancashire.

Inskip-with-Sowerby Parish in Wyre Borough, Lancashire, England

Inskip-with-Sowerby is a civil parish in the Borough of Wyre, in Lancashire, England. A part of the Fylde, the parish includes the village of Inskip and the hamlets Crossmoor to the west and Sowerby to the east. Also Inskip Moss Side lies about a mile north-west of the village at grid reference SD452391. In 2011 it had a population of 840.

Nether Wyresdale Human settlement in England

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St Helens Church, Churchtown Church in Churchtown, Lancashire

St Helen's Church is an Anglican church in the village of Churchtown in Lancashire, England. Historically, it was the parish church of Garstang; today, as Garstang is split into more than one ecclesiastical parish, St Helen's parish is Garstang St Helen (Churchtown). It is in the Diocese of Blackburn. It has been designated a Grade I listed building by English Heritage. St Helen's is known as the "cathedral of The Fylde".

References

  1. 1 2 UK Census (2011). "Local Area Report – Garstang Parish (E04005327)". Nomis. Office for National Statistics . Retrieved 27 March 2021.
  2. Brinkhoff, Thomas. "Garstang (Lancashire)". City Population. Retrieved 18 October 2014.
  3. "Lancashire A-L". The Domesday Book Online. Retrieved 22 January 2011.
  4. 1 2 Mills, David (20 October 2011). A Dictionary of British Place-Names. OUP Oxford. ISBN   9780199609086.
  5. (1912) "Townships: Garstang", A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 7, pp. 311-313. Retrieved 2007-10-25
  6. "Last name: Garstang", The placename is recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086
  7. A. D. Mills (2012). A Dictionary of British Place Names. Oxford University Press. ISBN   9780199609086.
  8. "Surname Database: Garstang Last Name Origin". The Internet Surname Database. Retrieved 13 September 2018.
  9. 1 2 "History – Visit Garstang". visitgarstang.com. Retrieved 13 September 2018.
  10. (1912) "The parish of Garstang", A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 7, pp. 291-300. Date accessed: 26 October 2007
  11. Historic England. "Market House (1072906)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 7 February 2022.
  12. "About Fairtrade Towns". Fairtrade Foundation. Archived from the original on 14 August 2011. Retrieved 6 July 2011.
  13. "Cheesemaker to use biggest windturbine in UK to power factory". The Daily Telegraph. London. 1 May 2009. Retrieved 13 May 2009.
  14. The Garstang Courier. "Garstang cheese firm wins hat trick of food awards" . Retrieved 13 May 2009.
  15. RHS. "Britain in Bloom 2005 Winners". Archived from the original on 29 September 2007. Retrieved 30 August 2007.
  16. A vision of Britain through time. "A vision of Garstang RD" . Retrieved 12 June 2007.
  17. "Garstang Courier article on Garstang politics".
  18. "Ward population 2011" . Retrieved 5 June 2015.
  19. The Times, 28 Oct 1928, page 18
  20. Greenall, R. (2007), Garstang Past, At Heart Ltd, Altrincham, ISBN   978-1-84547-137-8, p.52
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  22. "England Players - Dicky Bond". englandfootballonline.com.
  23. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 13 November 2014. Retrieved 13 November 2014.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  24. Anstead, Mark (27 March 2004). "Mary Anne just keeps on rocking ... in her own way". The Guardian.
  25. "Biography – RUNDLE, ROBERT TERRILL – Volume XII (1891–1900) – Dictionary of Canadian Biography". biographi.ca.
  26. "John Woolrich - Biography". fabermusic.com.