Bishop of Burnley

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The Bishop of Burnley is an episcopal title used by a suffragan bishop of the Church of England Diocese of Blackburn, in the Province of York, England. [1]

Episcopal polity Hierarchical form of church governance

An episcopal polity is a hierarchical form of church governance in which the chief local authorities are called bishops. It is the structure used by many of the major Christian Churches and denominations, such as the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Church of the East, Anglican, and Lutheran churches or denominations, and other churches founded independently from these lineages.

A suffragan bishop is a bishop subordinate to a metropolitan bishop or diocesan bishop and, consequently, are not normally jurisdictional in their role. Suffragan bishops may be charged by a metropolitan to oversee a suffragan diocese. They may be assigned to an area which does not have a cathedral of its own.

Church of England Anglican state church of England

The Church of England is the established church of England. The Archbishop of Canterbury is the most senior cleric, although the monarch is the supreme governor. The Church of England is also the mother church of the international Anglican Communion. It traces its history to the Christian church recorded as existing in the Roman province of Britain by the third century, and to the 6th-century Gregorian mission to Kent led by Augustine of Canterbury.

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The title takes its name after the town of Burnley in Lancashire. Originally, the suffragan bishops were appointed for the diocese of Manchester, but with the creation of the Diocese of Blackburn in 1926, Burnley came under the jurisdiction of the Bishop of Blackburn.

Burnley market town in Lancashire, England

Burnley is a town in Lancashire, England, with a 2001 population of 73,021. It is 21 miles (34 km) north of Manchester and 20 miles (32 km) east of Preston, at the confluence of the River Calder and River Brun.

Lancashire County of England

Lancashire is a ceremonial county in North West England. The administrative centre is Preston. The county has a population of 1,449,300 and an area of 1,189 square miles (3,080 km2). People from Lancashire are known as Lancastrians.

Anglican Diocese of Manchester Church of England diocese in the Province of York, England

The Diocese of Manchester is a Church of England diocese in the Province of York, England. Based in the city of Manchester, the diocese covers much of the county of Greater Manchester and small areas of the counties of Lancashire and Cheshire.

List of bishops

Bishops of Burnley
FromUntilIncumbentNotes
1901 [2] 1904 Edwyn Hoskyns Translated to Southwell
19051909 Alfred Pearson Consecreted Rector and Bishop Suffragan of Burnley on 2 Feb 1905, died in office of TB on 19 Mar 1909.
19091931 Henry Henn
19311949 Priestley Swain
19501954 Keith Prosser
19551970 George Holderness
19701988 Richard Watson
19881994 Ronald Milner
19942000 Martyn Jarrett Translated to Beverley
20002014 John Goddard Retired 19 July 2014.
2015present Philip North [3] Previously Bishop-designate of Whitby (October–December 2012); consecrated 2 February 2015 at York Minster; [4] Bishop-nominate of Sheffield (January–March 2017).
Source(s): [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 Crockford's Clerical Directory (100th ed.). London: Church House Publishing. 2007. p. 946. ISBN   978-0-7151-1030-0.
  2. "No. 27359". The London Gazette . 27 September 1901. p. 6292.
  3. "Press release - Suffragan Bishop of Burnley: Reverend Philip John North". gov.uk. Westminster. 7 November 2014. Retrieved 7 November 2014.
  4. Diocese of Blackburn – Consecration of the Eleventh Bishop of Burnley at York Minster Archived 2015-02-03 at the Wayback Machine (Accessed 2 February 2015)


  1. Crockford's Clerical Directory listings