Bishop of Burnley

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The Bishop of Burnley is an episcopal title used by a suffragan bishop of the Church of England Diocese of Blackburn, in the Province of York, England. [1]

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The title takes its name after the town of Burnley in Lancashire. Originally, the suffragan bishops were appointed for the diocese of Manchester, but with the creation of the Diocese of Blackburn in 1926, Burnley came under the jurisdiction of the Bishop of Blackburn.

List of bishops

Bishops of Burnley
FromUntilIncumbentNotes
1901 [2] 1904 Edwyn Hoskyns Translated to Southwell
19051909 Alfred Pearson Consecrated Rector and Bishop Suffragan of Burnley on 2 Feb 1905, died in office of TB on 19 Mar 1909.
19091931 Henry Henn
19311949 Priestley Swain
19501954 Keith Prosser
19551970 George Holderness
19701988 Richard Watson
19881994 Ronald Milner
19942000 Martyn Jarrett Translated to Beverley
20002014 John Goddard Retired 19 July 2014.
2015present Philip North [3] Previously Bishop-designate of Whitby (October–December 2012); consecrated 2 February 2015 at York Minster; [4] Bishop-nominate of Sheffield (January–March 2017).
Source(s): [1]

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John Goddard (bishop)

John William Goddard is a retired former bishop of the Church of England. From 2000 to 2014, he was Bishop of Burnley, a suffragan bishop in the Diocese of Blackburn. He left the Church of England and was received into the Roman Catholic Church in 2021. He was ordained deacon on Tuesday 29 March 2022 and priest on Saturday 2 April 2022 by Bishop Tom Williams in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King, Liverpool.

Philip North

Philip John North is a bishop in the Church of England. Since February 2015, he has been Bishop of Burnley, a suffragan bishop in the Diocese of Blackburn. He was previously Team Rector of the Parish of Old St Pancras.

References

  1. 1 2 Crockford's Clerical Directory (100th ed.). London: Church House Publishing. 2007. p. 946. ISBN   978-0-7151-1030-0.
  2. "No. 27359". The London Gazette . 27 September 1901. p. 6292.
  3. "Press release - Suffragan Bishop of Burnley: Reverend Philip John North". gov.uk. Westminster. 7 November 2014. Retrieved 7 November 2014.
  4. Diocese of Blackburn – Consecration of the Eleventh Bishop of Burnley at York Minster Archived 2015-02-03 at the Wayback Machine (Accessed 2 February 2015)


  1. Crockford's Clerical Directory listings