Bishop of Berwick

Last updated
For assistant bishops in Newcastle, New South Wales, see Anglican Diocese of Newcastle (Australia).

The Bishop of Berwick is an episcopal title used by the suffragan bishop of the Church of England Diocese of Newcastle in the Province of York, England. [1]

Episcopal polity Hierarchical form of church governance

An episcopal polity is a hierarchical form of church governance in which the chief local authorities are called bishops. It is the structure used by many of the major Christian Churches and denominations, such as the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Church of the East, Anglican, and Lutheran churches or denominations, and other churches founded independently from these lineages.

A suffragan bishop is a bishop subordinate to a metropolitan bishop or diocesan bishop and, consequently, are not normally jurisdictional in their role. Suffragan bishops may be charged by a metropolitan to oversee a suffragan diocese. They may be assigned to an area which does not have a cathedral of its own.

Church of England Anglican state church of England

The Church of England is the established church of England. The Archbishop of Canterbury is the most senior cleric, although the monarch is the supreme governor. The Church of England is also the mother church of the international Anglican Communion. It traces its history to the Christian church recorded as existing in the Roman province of Britain by the third century, and to the 6th-century Gregorian mission to Kent led by Augustine of Canterbury.

Contents

The title was originally created in 1537 in the Diocese of Durham, [2] and takes its name from the town of Berwick-upon-Tweed in Northumberland. After the death of the only bishop in 1572, the title went into abeyance. [3]

Diocese of Durham Church of England diocese

The Diocese of Durham is a Church of England diocese, based in Durham, and covering the historic County Durham. It was created in AD 635 as the Diocese of Lindisfarne. The cathedral is Durham Cathedral and the bishop is the Bishop of Durham who used to live at Auckland Castle, Bishop Auckland, and still has his office there. The diocese's administrative centre, the Diocesan Office, is located at Cuthbert House, Stonebridge just outside Durham City. This was opened in 2015.

Berwick-upon-Tweed town in the county of Northumberland, England

Berwick-upon-Tweed is a town in the county of Northumberland. It is the northernmost town in England, at the mouth of the River Tweed on the east coast, 2 12 miles (4 km) south of the Scottish border. Berwick is approximately 56 miles (90 km) east-south east of Edinburgh, 65 miles (105 km) north of Newcastle upon Tyne and 345 miles (555 km) north of London.

Northumberland County of England

Northumberland is a unitary authority and a Historic County in North East England. The northernmost county of England, the unitary authority borders Cumbria to the west, County Durham and Tyne and Wear to the south and the Scottish Borders to the north. To the east is the North Sea coastline with a path 103 kilometres (64 mi) long. The county town is Alnwick, although the county council is based in Morpeth.

From 1980 until 2016, the Assistant Bishop of Newcastle was an episcopal title used by the sole stipendiary assistant bishop (effectively suffragan bishop) of the Diocese of Newcastle. [4] The title took its name as the bishop who assists the diocesan Bishop of Newcastle.

On 28 November 2015, Frank White, Assistant Bishop of Newcastle (at the end of a vacancy in the See of Newcastle), presented a proposal to the Diocesan Synod of the Diocese of Newcastle (within which diocese Berwick now lies) to revive the abeyant Suffragan See of Berwick. [5] [6] The Dioceses Commission approved the petition to revive the See, [7] the post was advertised in April 2016, and the appointment of Mark Tanner, Warden of Cranmer Hall, Durham, (part of St John's College, Durham) was announced on 1 September 2016. [1]

Francis White is a retired English Anglican bishop. He was Bishop of Brixworth and then the Assistant Bishop of Newcastle, in the Church of England.

The Bishop of Newcastle is the ordinary of the Church of England's Diocese of Newcastle in the Province of York.

Mark Simon Austin Tanner is a British Anglican bishop and academic. Since 2016, he has been the Bishop of Berwick, a suffragan bishop in the Diocese of Newcastle From August 2011 until his consecration, he was the Warden of Cranmer Hall, Durham, a Church of England theological college. In September 2016, he was announced as the next Bishop of Berwick, and was consecrated a bishop on 18 October 2016 during a service at York Minster.

List of bishops

Bishops of Berwick
FromUntilIncumbentNotes
15371572 Thomas Sparke Consecrated on 9 December 1537; died in 1572.
15722016in abeyance
Assistant Bishops of Newcastle
FromUntilIncumbentNotes
19801998 [8] Ken Gill Formerly Bishop of the Central Karnataka Diocese of the Church of South India. [9] Appointed stipendiary Assistant Bishop of Newcastle in 1980. [10]
19982010 Paul Richardson Formerly Bishop of Wangaratta in the Anglican Church of Australia. Resigned and joined the Roman Catholic Church [11]
20102016 Frank White Formerly suffragan Bishop of Brixworth. [12]
Bishops of Berwick
15722016in abeyance
2016present Mark Tanner Consecrated 18 October 2016. [1]
Source(s): [2] [13]

Other assistant bishops

Anthony Hunter resigned as assistant bishop effective 1 September 1980. [14]

Anthony George Weaver Hunter (1916–2002) was the inaugural Anglican bishop of Swaziland.

Related Research Articles

The Bishop of Bradford is an episcopal title used by a suffragan bishop of the Church of England Diocese of Leeds, in the Province of York, England. The title takes its name after Bradford, a city in West Yorkshire.

The Bishop of Ripon is an episcopal title which takes its name after the city of Ripon in North Yorkshire, England. The bishop is one of the area bishops of the Diocese of Leeds in the Province of York. The area bishop of Ripon has oversight of the archdeaconry of Richmond and Craven, which consists of the deaneries of Bowland, Ewecross, Harrogate, Richmond, Ripon, Skipton, and Wensley.

The Bishop of Wakefield is an episcopal title which takes its name after the city of Wakefield in West Yorkshire, England. The title was first created for a diocesan bishop in 1888, but it was dissolved in 2014. The Bishop of Wakefield is now an area bishop who has oversight of an episcopal area in the Diocese of Leeds.

The Bishop of Ramsbury is an episcopal title used by a suffragan bishop of the Church of England Diocese of Salisbury, in the Province of Canterbury, England. The title takes its name after the town of Ramsbury in Wiltshire, and was first used between the 10th and 11th centuries by the Anglo-Saxon Bishops of Ramsbury. From the establishment of the Salisbury area scheme in 1981 until its abolition in 2009, the bishops suffragan of Ramsbury were area bishops. The bishop oversees the Wiltshire parts of the diocese, i.e. the Archdeaconries of Sarum and Wilts.

The Bishop of Southwell and Nottingham is the diocesan bishop of the Church of England Diocese of Southwell and Nottingham in the Province of York.

The Bishop of Sherborne is an episcopal title which takes its name from the market town of Sherborne in Dorset, England. The see of Sherborne was established in around 705 by St Aldhelm, the Abbot of Malmesbury. This see was the mother diocese of the greater part of southwestern England in Saxon times, but after the Norman Conquest was incorporated into the new Diocese of Salisbury. The title Bishop of Sherborne is now used by the Church of England for a suffragan bishop in the Diocese of Salisbury.

Not to be confused with the Diocesan Bishop of Hereford.

The Diocese of Newcastle is a Church of England diocese based in Newcastle upon Tyne, covering the historic county of Northumberland, as well as the area of Alston Moor in Cumbria.

Diocese of Chelmsford Church of England diocese

The Diocese of Chelmsford is a Church of England diocese, part of the Province of Canterbury. The diocese covers Essex and the five East London boroughs of Barking and Dagenham, Havering, Newham, Redbridge, and Waltham Forest, and is co-terminous with the boundaries of the Catholic Diocese of Brentwood. It is divided into three episcopal areas, each with its own area bishop. The Diocese covers a region of around 1,500 square miles (3,900 km2) and has a population of more than 3 million; it has 463 parishes and a total of 588 churches; it is the second largest Anglican diocese in England.

The Bishop of Dover is an episcopal title used by a suffragan bishop of the Church of England Diocese of Canterbury, England, The title takes its name after the town of Dover in Kent. The Bishop of Dover holds the additional title of "Bishop in Canterbury" and is empowered to act almost as if she were the diocesan bishop of Canterbury, since the actual diocesan bishop is based at Lambeth Palace in London, and thus is frequently away from his diocese, fulfilling national and international duties. Among other things, this gives the Bishop of Dover an ex officio seat in the Church's General Synod. Until 2009, there was another suffragan, the Bishop of Maidstone, who did not have the same extra powers.

The Bishop of Maidstone is an episcopal title used by a suffragan bishop of the Church of England Diocese of Canterbury, in the Province of Canterbury, England. The title takes its name after the county town of Maidstone in Kent and had a similar though subordinate role to that of the Bishop of Dover. It was decided at the diocesan synod of November 2010 that a new bishop would not be appointed.

The Bishop of Crediton is an episcopal title which takes its name from the town of Crediton in Devon, England. The title was originally used by the Anglo-Saxons in the 10th and 11th centuries for a diocese covering Devon and Cornwall. It is now used by the Church of England as the title of a suffragan bishop who assists the diocesan Bishop of Exeter.

The Bishop of Edmonton is an episcopal title used by an area bishop of the Church of England Diocese of London in the Province of Canterbury, England. The title takes its name after Edmonton, an area in the North of the London Borough of Enfield.

The Bishop of Tewkesbury is an episcopal title used by a suffragan bishop of the Church of England Diocese of Gloucester, in the Province of Canterbury, England. The title takes its name after the town of Tewkesbury in Gloucestershire, but the bishop's responsibilities cover the whole diocese. As with all suffragan sees, the need for the see of Tewkesbury is reconsidered every time it falls vacant. In both 2013 and 2016, the diocesan synod recommended that a new bishop be appointed, concluding that the need for a bishop was greater than ever.

The Suffragan Bishop in Europe is an episcopal title used by a suffragan bishop of the Church of England Diocese in Europe The suffragan bishop assists the diocesan Bishop in Europe in overseeing the largest geographical diocese of the Church of England.

The Bishop of Basingstoke is an episcopal title used by a suffragan bishop of the Church of England Diocese of Winchester, in the province of Canterbury, England. The title takes its name after the town of Basingstoke in Hampshire. The see was vacant since the translation of Peter Hancock to the Bishop of Bath and Wells on 4 March 2014; on 26 June 2014, it was announced that David Williams, Vicar of Christ Church Winchester, was to be consecrated Bishop of Basingstoke. Williams assumed the role on 19 September 2014 at a consecration service at Winchester Cathedral.

The Bishop of Leicester was a suffragan bishop of the Church of England Diocese of Peterborough in the Province of Canterbury.

Bishop of Ripon (modern diocese) diocesan bishop in the Church of England

The Bishop of Ripon was a diocesan bishop's title which took its name after the city of Ripon in North Yorkshire, England.

References

  1. 1 2 3 Diocese of Newcastle — Mark Tanner announced as new Suffragan Bishop of Berwick Archived 5 September 2016 at the Wayback Machine (Accessed 2 September 2016)
  2. 1 2 Crockford's Clerical Directory (100th ed.). London: Church House Publishing. 2007. p. 945. ISBN   978-0-7151-1030-0.
  3. Handbook of British Chronology, page 287. Retrieved on 9 October 2008.
  4. Anglican Communion — Newcastle
  5. Newcastle Diocesan Synod, 28 November 2015 — Agenda Archived 26 January 2016 at the Wayback Machine (Accessed 19 January 2016)
  6. Newcastle Diocesan Synod, 28 November 2015 — Suffragan See of Berwick Archived 26 January 2016 at the Wayback Machine (Accessed 19 January 2016)
  7. Diocese of Newcastle — Frank White to retire in September Archived 13 May 2016 at the Wayback Machine (Accessed 28 April 2016)
  8. Haydon News, April 1998 (p. 12)
  9. "Archbishop of Canterbury Awards Lambeth Degrees". Official Archbishop of Canterbury website. 7 September 2004. Archived from the original on 19 March 2012. Retrieved 20 January 2011.
  10. Whitaker's Almanack (120th ed.). London: Whitaker and Sons Ltd. 1988. p. 488. ISBN   0-85021-178-6.
  11. ""Church of England bishop converts to Rome" - Damian Thompson - Daily Telegraph". The Daily Telegraph. London. 17 February 2010. Retrieved 3 June 2011.
  12. Diocese of Newcastle — New Assistant Bishop of Newcastle announced
  13. Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1986). Handbook of British Chronology (Third Edition, revised ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 287. ISBN   0-521-56350-X.
  14. "Newcastle's new Assistant Bishop" . Church Times (#6117). 9 October 1980. p. 20. ISSN   0009-658X . Retrieved 8 September 2019 via UK Press Online archives.