Bishop of Fulham

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The Bishop of Fulham is a suffragan bishop in the Diocese of London in the Church of England. The bishopric is named after Fulham, an area of south-west London; the see was erected under the Suffragans Nomination Act 1888 by Order in Council dated 1 February 1926. [1]

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Until 1980 the Bishop of Fulham was the bishop with episcopal oversight (delegated from the Bishop of London) of churches in northern and central Europe. In that year, responsibility for these parishes was transferred to the Bishop of Gibraltar as head of the renamed Diocese of Gibraltar in Europe.

At present, the Bishop of Fulham fulfils the role of a provincial episcopal visitor for the dioceses of London and Southwark. This means having pastoral oversight of those parishes in the Anglo-Catholic tradition which cannot, on grounds of theological conviction, accept the ordination of women to the priesthood and episcopate, or bishops who have participated in ordaining women. [2] [3] As of December 2017, 46 parishes in the Diocese of London (almost one eighth of the total number) receive alternative episcopal oversight (AEO) from the Bishop of Fulham. [4]

In November 2010, following the announcement of Bishop John Broadhurst's resignation and reception into the Roman Catholic Church, the Bishop of London temporarily conferred episcopal oversight for traditionalist congregations in the two dioceses to the Bishop of Edmonton. [5] On 31 October 2012 it was announced that Jonathan Baker, then Bishop of Ebbsfleet, would translate to Fulham, resuming Broadhurst's AEO responsibilities. [6] This took place on 13 February 2013. [7] [8]

List of bishops

Bishop coadjutor in Northern and Central Europe
FromUntilIncumbentNotes
18841886 Jonathan Titcomb former Bishop of Rangoon [9]
18861911 Edward Wilkinson former Bishop of Zululand
19111926 Herbert Bury translated from British Honduras; afterwards an Assistant Bishop of London
Source(s): [10]
Bishops of Fulham (oversight over northern and central Europe)
FromUntilIncumbentNotes
19261947 Basil Batty
19471949 William Selwyn
19491955 George Ingle Translated to Willesden
19551957 Robert Stopford Translated to Peterborough
19571966 Roderic Coote Translated to Colchester
19661970 Alan Rogers
19701980 John Satterthwaite Also Bishop of Gibraltar
Source(s): [3]
Bishops of Fulham (extended episcopal oversight from 1993)
FromUntilIncumbentNotes
19821985 Brian Masters Translated to Edmonton
19851996 John Klyberg Became a Roman Catholic in 1996
19962010 John Broadhurst SSC Resigned on 31 December 2010 to become a Roman Catholic
20102013Vacant Extended episcopal oversight exercised by the Bishop of Edmonton.
2013present Jonathan Baker Translated from Ebbsfleet.
Source(s): [3]

See also

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References

  1. "No. 33129". The London Gazette . 2 February 1926. p. 763.
  2. Bishop of Fulham's website. Retrieved on 6 June 2008. Archived 16 May 2008 at the Wayback Machine
  3. 1 2 3 Crockford's Clerical Directory (100th ed.). London: Church House Publishing. 2007. p. 946. ISBN   978-0-7151-1030-0.
  4. "Nomination of the next Bishop of London". Forward in Faith. 18 December 2017. Retrieved 19 December 2017.
  5. Diocese of London — Arrangements following the resignation of the Bishop of Fulham
  6. "Articles". www.archbishopofcanterbury.org. Retrieved 31 October 2012.
  7. "New Bishop of Fulham announced" (Press release). Diocese of London. 31 October 2012. Archived from the original on 18 November 2012. Retrieved 31 October 2012.
  8. "A Message from Bishop Jonathan" (Press release). Bishop of Ebbsfleet. 30 October 2012. Retrieved 6 February 2013.
  9. "Titcomb, Jonathan Holt (TTCM837JH)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.
  10. "Who was Who" 1897-2007 London, A & C Black, 2007 ISBN   978-0-19-954087-7