Bishop of Beverley

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The Bishop of Beverley is a Church of England suffragan bishop. The title takes its name after the town of Beverley in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. [1]

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The suffragan bishop was originally to assist the Archbishop of York in overseeing the Diocese of York, but after 1923 the position fell into abeyance. The See was revived under the Suffragans Nomination Act 1888 by Order in Council dated 8 February 1994, [2] as a Provincial Episcopal Visitor for the Province of York. The bishop has responsibility for those parishes in 9 dioceses of the province who cannot in good conscience accept the sacramental ministry of bishops who have participated in the ordination of women. As of 2014, three of the twelve dioceses in the northern province provide a different suffragan bishop to such parishes in their diocese: in the Diocese of Leeds this is the Bishop of Wakefield, and in Blackburn and Carlisle the Bishop of Burnley. [3]

The bishop's office is in Micklegate, York. [4]

The See was vacant since Bishop Glyn Webster's retirement; in the vacancy, the Bishop suffragan of Burnley had undertaken duties in the west of the province and the area Bishop of Wakefield in the east. [5] In October 2022, it was announced that Stephen Peter Race would be the next Bishop of Beverley: his consecration took place on 30 November 2022 at York Minister. [6] [7]

List of bishops

Bishops of Beverley
FromUntilIncumbentNotes
18891923 Robert Crosthwaite [8]
19231994in abeyance
7 March 19942000 John Gaisford SSC
20002012 Martyn Jarrett SSCFormerly Bishop of Burnley
25 January 20132022 Glyn Webster Formerly Canon Chancellor at York Minster; retired 6 January 2022
2022present Stephen Race SSCConsecrated 30 November 2022 [6] [7]
Source(s): [1]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 Crockford's Clerical Directory (100th ed.). London: Church House Publishing. 2007. p. 945. ISBN   978-0-7151-1030-0.
  2. "No. 53585". The London Gazette . 11 February 1994. p. 2143.
  3. See of Beverley – Parishes
  4. See of Beverey, accessed 6 February 2022
  5. "Thank You from Bishop Glyn". The Bishop of Beverley. 10 January 2022. Archived from the original on 10 January 2022. Retrieved 18 January 2022.
  6. 1 2 "Announcement of the next Bishop of Beverley". See of Beverley. 12 October 2022. Archived from the original on 14 October 2022. Retrieved 17 October 2022.
  7. 1 2 "The Consecration of the Bishop of Beverley". The Archbishop of York. 22 November 2022. Retrieved 30 November 2022.
  8. Beverley Festival: The Bishop of Beverley Archived 10 February 2006 at the Wayback Machine . Retrieved on 3 June 2008.