Bishop of Beverley

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Not to be confused with now suppressed title, relating to the Catholic Diocese of Beverley

The Bishop of Beverley is a Church of England suffragan bishop. The title takes its name after the town of Beverley in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. [1]

Contents

The suffragan bishop was originally to assist the Archbishop of York in overseeing the Diocese of York, but after 1923 the position fell into abeyance. The See was revived under the Suffragans Nomination Act 1888 by Order in Council dated 8 February 1994, [2] as a Provincial Episcopal Visitor for the Province of York. The bishop has responsibility for those parishes in 9 dioceses of the province who cannot in good conscience accept the sacramental ministry of bishops who have participated in the ordination of women. As of 2014, three of the twelve dioceses in the northern province provide a different suffragan bishop to such parishes in their diocese: in the Diocese of Leeds the Bishop of Wakefield and in Blackburn and Carlisle the Bishop of Burnley. [3]

On 29 August 2012, the appointment of Glyn Webster as Bishop of Beverley was announced. [4] He was duly consecrated on 25 January 2013.

List of bishops

Bishops of Beverley
FromUntilIncumbentNotes
18891923 Robert Crosthwaite [5]
19231994in abeyance
7 March 19942000 John Gaisford SSC
20002012 Martyn Jarrett SSCFormerly Bishop of Burnley
25 January 2013present Glyn Webster Formerly Canon Chancellor at York Minster
Source(s): [1]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 Crockford's Clerical Directory (100th ed.). London: Church House Publishing. 2007. p. 945. ISBN   978-0-7151-1030-0.
  2. "No. 53585". The London Gazette . 11 February 1994. p. 2143.
  3. See of Beverley – Parishes
  4. Number 10 – Suffragan See of Beverley
  5. Beverley Festival: The Bishop of Beverley Archived 10 February 2006 at the Wayback Machine . Retrieved on 3 June 2008.