Bishop of Penrith

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The Bishop of Penrith is an episcopal title which takes its name after the town of Penrith in Cumbria. [1]

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The title was first mentioned (as Pereth) in the Suffragan Bishops Act 1534 (alongside a see for Penreth – now called Penrydd – in Pembrokeshire) and was first used for the Diocese of Ripon in 1888, [1] but the incumbent had his episcopal title transferred to Richmond by Royal Warrant in 1889. [1] Since 1939, the Bishop of Penrith is a suffragan bishop in the Church of England Diocese of Carlisle who assists the diocesan Bishop of Carlisle in overseeing the diocese. [1]

List of bishops

Bishops of Penrith
FromUntilIncumbentNotes
15341888in abeyanceCrockfords shows John Bird as Bishop 1537-39 but this is almost certainly incorrect due to the misidentification of his See of Penreth with Penrith. John Byrde was consecrated for Dio.Llandaff (possibly for Skenfrith in Monmouthshire) and in 1539 was translated to Bangor.
18881889 John Pulleine Appointed for the diocese of Ripon. His suffragan title was changed by Royal Warrant to Richmond in 1889.
18891939in abeyance
19391944 Grandage Powell
19441959 Herbert Turner
19591966 Cyril Bulley Translated to Carlisle
19671970 Reginald Foskett
19701979 Edward Pugh
19791994 George Hacker
19942002 Richard Garrard
20022009 James Newcome Translated to Carlisle on 10 October 2009. [2] [3] [4]
20092011no appointment
20112018 Robert Freeman Consecrated on 28 October 2011; [5] retired "Easter" 2018. [6]
20192021 Emma Ineson Consecrated on 27 February 2019; [7] resigned See to become "Bishop to the Archbishops of Canterbury and York" on 1 June 2021. [8]
2022present Rob Saner-Haigh Consecrated 15 July 2022. [9]
Source(s): [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 Crockford's Clerical Directory (100th ed.). London: Church House Publishing. 2007. p. 948. ISBN   978-0-7151-1030-0.
  2. "Diocese of Carlisle". Number10. 28 May 2009. Archived from the original on 11 June 2009.
  3. "67th Bishop of Carlisle announced". Diocese of Carlisle. Archived from the original on 23 June 2010. Retrieved 3 June 2009.
  4. "New Bishop of Carlisle is set to be enthroned". Westmorland Gazette. 10 October 2009. Retrieved 15 December 2009.
  5. Consecrations of the Bishops of Durham and Penrith Archived 2011-09-27 at the Wayback Machine
  6. Diocese of Carlisle — Announcement of Bishop Robert's retirement (Accessed 4 November 2017)
  7. https://www.carlislediocese.org.uk/news/1936/61/The-Revd-Dr-Emma-Ineson-named-as-new-Bishop-of-Penrith.html Archived 2018-05-10 at the Wayback Machine ?
  8. "Bishop Emma Ineson to be Bishop to the Archbishops of Canterbury and York".
  9. "The new Bishop of Penrith is consecrated". Diocese of Carlisle. Archived from the original on 15 July 2022. Retrieved 3 August 2022.

D.H.Marston: "The Bishopric of Barrow-in-Furness" (2nd Edition, 2017)