Bishop of Swindon

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The Bishop of Swindon is an episcopal title used by a suffragan bishop of the Church of England Diocese of Bristol, in the Province of Canterbury, England. [1] The title takes its name after the town of Swindon in Wiltshire. The title of Bishop of Malmesbury was the precursor title, named after Malmesbury in Wiltshire; the See was erected under the Suffragans Nomination Act 1888 by Order in Council dated 25 July 1927. [2]

Contents

List of bishops of Swindon

Bishops of Malmesbury
FromUntilIncumbentNotes
19271946 Ronald Ramsay
19461956 Ivor Watkins Translated to Guildford
19561962 Edward Roberts Translated to Kensington
19621973 Jim Bishop
19731983 Freddy Temple
19831994 Peter Firth
Bishops of Swindon
19942004 Michael Doe
2005present Lee Rayfield Also Acting Bishop of Bristol, 2017–18 [3]
Source(s): [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 Crockford's Clerical Directory (100th ed.). London: Church House Publishing. 2007. pp. 947–949. ISBN   978-0-7151-1030-0.
  2. "No. 33299". The London Gazette . 2 August 1927. p. 4979.
  3. "Senior clergy". Diocese of Bristol. Archived from the original on 9 November 2017.