Bishop of Middleton

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The Bishop of Middleton is an episcopal title used by a suffragan bishop of the Church of England Diocese of Manchester, in the Province of York, England. [1] The title takes its name after the town of Middleton in Greater Manchester; the See was erected under the Suffragans Nomination Act 1888 by Order in Council dated 10 August 1926. [2] The suffragan has oversight of the archdeaconries of Manchester and Rochdale.

Contents

List of bishops

Bishops of Middleton
FromUntilIncumbentNotes
19271932 Richard Parsons (1882–1948). Translated to Southwark, and later to Hereford
19321938 Cecil Wilson (1875–1937)
19381943 Arthur Alston (1872–1954)
19431952 Edward Mowll (1881–1944)
19521958 Frank Woods (1907–1992). Translated to Melbourne
19581959 Robert Nelson (1913–1959)
19591982 Ted Wickham (1911–1994)
19821992 Donald Tytler (1925–1992) Died in office
2 February 19941999 Stephen Venner (b. 1944). Translated to Dover
19992007 Michael Lewis (b. 1953). Translated to Cyprus and the Gulf
2008present Mark Davies (b. 1962)
Source(s): [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 Crockford's Clerical Directory (100th ed.). London: Church House Publishing. 2007. pp. 947–948. ISBN   978-0-7151-1030-0.
  2. "No. 33190". The London Gazette . 10 August 1926. p. 5287.