Bishop of Manchester

Last updated
Bishop of Manchester
Bishopric
anglican
Incumbent:
David Walker
Location
Ecclesiastical province York
Residence Bishopscourt, Broughton
Information
First holder James Prince Lee
Established1847
Diocese Manchester
Cathedral Manchester Cathedral

The Bishop of Manchester is the ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Manchester in the Province of York. [1] [2]

Church of England Anglican church in England, by law established

The Church of England is the established church of England. The Archbishop of Canterbury is the most senior cleric, although the monarch is the supreme governor. The Church of England is also the mother church of the international Anglican Communion. It traces its history to the Christian church recorded as existing in the Roman province of Britain by the third century, and to the 6th-century Gregorian mission to Kent led by Augustine of Canterbury.

Anglican Diocese of Manchester Church of England diocese in the Province of York, England

The Diocese of Manchester is a Church of England diocese in the Province of York, England. Based in the city of Manchester, the diocese covers much of the county of Greater Manchester and small areas of the counties of Lancashire and Cheshire.

Province of York Church of England ecclesiastical province

The Province of York is one of two ecclesiastical provinces making up the Church of England and consists of 12 dioceses which cover the northern third of England and the Isle of Man. York was elevated to an archbishopric in AD 735: Ecgbert was the first archbishop. At one time the Archbishops of York also claimed metropolitan authority over Scotland but these claims were never realised and ceased when the Archdiocese of St Andrews was established.

Contents

The current bishop is David Walker who was enthroned on 30 November 2013. The bishop's official residence is Bishopscourt, Broughton, Salford. [3]

Broughton, Salford suburb of Salford, Greater Manchester, England

Broughton is a suburb of Salford, England, on the east bank of the River Irwell 1.3 miles (2.1 km) northwest of Manchester city centre and 2.1 miles (3.4 km) south of Prestwich, which includes Broughton Park, Higher Broughton and Lower Broughton.

History

The Diocese of Manchester was founded in 1847. With the growth of the population in and around Manchester, the bishop appointed the first suffragan bishop, the Bishop of Hulme, in 1924 to assist in overseeing the diocese. Three years later a second was appointed, the Bishop of Middleton. After nearly sixty years, the third and final suffragan bishop, the Bishop of Bolton, was appointed in 1984. [4]

A suffragan bishop is a bishop subordinate to a metropolitan bishop or diocesan bishop and, consequently, are not normally jurisdictional in their role. Suffragan bishops may be charged by a metropolitan to oversee a suffragan diocese. They may be assigned to an area which does not have a cathedral of its own.

The Bishop of Hulme was an episcopal title used by a suffragan bishop of the Church of England Diocese of Manchester, in the Province of York, England. The See was created by Order in Council on 11 October 1923 and took its name after Hulme, an area of the city of Manchester.

The Bishop of Middleton is an episcopal title used by a suffragan bishop of the Church of England Diocese of Manchester, in the Province of York, England. The title takes its name after the town of Middleton in Greater Manchester. The suffragan has oversight of the archdeaconries of Manchester and Rochdale.

List of bishops

Bishops of Manchester
FromUntilIncumbentNotes
18481869 JamesPrinceLee.jpg James Prince Lee Died in office.
18701885 Bp James Fraser.jpg James Fraser Died in office; in the ensuing vacancy, John Mitchinson was acting bishop. [5]
18861903 James Moorhouse, by Herbert Rose Barraud.jpg James Moorhouse Translated from Melbourne; retired; died 1915.
19031921 E A Knox Bp Manchester, Rotary.jpg Edmund Knox Translated from Coventry; retired; died 1937.
19211929 The Royal Navy during the Second World War A11567 (Archbp Temple crop).jpg William Temple Translated to York then Canterbury; died in office 1944.
19291947 No image.svg Guy Warman Translated from Chelmsford; retired; died 1953.
19471970 No image.svg William Greer Retired; died 1972.
19701978 No image.svg Patrick Rodger Translated to Oxford; retired; died 2002.
19791992 [6] No image.svg Stanley Booth-Clibborn Retired; died 1996.
19932002 No image.svg Christopher Mayfield Translated from Wolverhampton; retired.
20022013 No image.svg Nigel McCulloch Translated from Wakefield.
2013incumbent No image.svg David Walker Translated from Dudley
Source(s): [7]

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References

  1. Crockford's Clerical Directory 2008/2009 (100th edition), Church House Publishing ( ISBN   978-0-7151-1030-0).
  2. Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1986). Handbook of British Chronology (Third Edition, revised ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 260–261. ISBN   0-521-56350-X.
  3. Provincial Directory: Manchester. Retrieved 17 February 2009.
  4. Manchester and its many bishops. BBC. Retrieved 17 February 2009.
  5. "col. 1" . Church Times (#1191). 20 November 1885. p. 899. ISSN   0009-658X . Retrieved 27 May 2019 via UK Press Online archives.
  6. "New bishop announced". Independent. 23 Dec 1992. Retrieved 6 April 2015.
  7. "Historical successions: Manchester". Crockford's Clerical Directory. Retrieved 14 July 2012.