Bonwick Island

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Bonwick Island is an island in the Broughton Archipelago in Central Coast region of British Columbia, Canada. The archipelago is located on the northeast side of Queen Charlotte Strait and lies northwest of the Village of Alert Bay and immediately to the west of Gilford Island, separated from it by Retreat Pass. [1] Arrow Passage is on the island's northwest, [2] separating it from Mars Island.

Island Any piece of sub-continental land that is surrounded by water

An island or isle is any piece of sub-continental land that is surrounded by water. Very small islands such as emergent land features on atolls can be called islets, skerries, cays or keys. An island in a river or a lake island may be called an eyot or ait, and a small island off the coast may be called a holm. A grouping of geographically or geologically related islands is called an archipelago, such as the Philippines.

Broughton Archipelago geographical object

The Broughton Archipelago is a group of islands on the northeastern flank of the Queen Charlotte Strait on the coast of British Columbia, Canada. The largest islands in the group, which includes numerous smaller islets, are Broughton Island, North Broughton Island, Eden Island, Bonwick Island and Baker Island. The islands are all located within the Regional District of Mount Waddington; however, nearly all lands in the area are owned by the Provincial Crown and most settlements in the area, with the exclusion of floating settlements, are either Indian Reserves of bands of the Musgamagw Tsawataineuk Tribal Council or fish farms under the jurisdiction of the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans.

British Columbia Coast coastline alongside the Pacific Ocean in British Columbia, Canada

The British Columbia Coast or BC Coast is Canada's western continental coastline on the North Pacific Ocean. The usage is synonymous with the term West Coast of Canada.

Contents

Features

On the island's northeast side of the island is Waddington Bay at 50°43′02″N126°36′55″W / 50.71722°N 126.61528°W / 50.71722; -126.61528 (Waddington Bay) , named after entrepreneur Alfred Waddington [3] whose ill-fated attempt to build a wagon road from Bute Inlet to the Cariboo became the flashpoint of the Chilcotin War of 1864. Waddington Harbour at the head of Bute Inlet is also named for him.

Alfred Waddington Canadian politician

Alfred Penderell Waddington, during his later years, was actively involved in the Colony of Vancouver Island in what later became the province of British Columbia, Canada.

Bute Inlet

Bute Inlet is one of the principal inlets of the British Columbia Coast. It is 80 km long from the estuaries of the Homathko and Southgate Rivers at the head of the inlet, to the mouth, where it is nearly blocked by Stuart Island, and it averages about 4 km in width. Bute Inlet is in a spectacular wilderness setting and is one of the most scenic waterways in the world. In the upper reaches of the inlet mountains rise 9000 feet above sea level. Bute Inlet is a spectacular wilderness that is visited by very few people. In more recent years tourists are travelling from around the world to view grizzly bears in a natural setting and explore the wilderness of Bute Inlet.

Cariboo Gold Rush

The Cariboo Gold Rush was a gold rush in the Colony of British Columbia, which earlier joined the Canadian province of British Columbia. The first gold discovery was made at Hills Bar in 1858, followed by more strikes in 1859 on the Horsefly River, and on Keithley Creek and Antler Creek in 1860. The actual rush began until 1861, when these discoveries were widely publicized. By 1865, following the strikes along Williams Creek, the rush was in full swing.

South of Waddington Bay is Grebe Cove at 50°42′36″N126°37′20″W / 50.71000°N 126.62222°W / 50.71000; -126.62222 (Grebe Cove) , [4] south of which is Carrie Bay at 50°41′33″N126°37′43″W / 50.69250°N 126.62861°W / 50.69250; -126.62861 (Carrie Bay) . [5]

On the island's northwest side is Betty Cove at 50°42′16″N126°39′51″W / 50.70444°N 126.66417°W / 50.70444; -126.66417 (Betty Cove) , [6] and to the south of it Dusky Cove at 50°41′35″N126°39′44″W / 50.69306°N 126.66222°W / 50.69306; -126.66222 (Dusky Cove) . [7]

Name origin

Bonwick Island was named by Captain Pender after Charles Bonwick, acting assistant engineer above the gunboat HMS Grappler in 1860, then as acting chief engineer on the survey ship Beaver from 1863. He retired and was living in England by 1906. The Bonwick Islands, now the Augustine Islands, Bonwick Point and Mount Bonwick were also named for him. [8]

Daniel Pender was a Royal Navy Staff Commander, later Captain, who surveyed the Coast of British Columbia aboard HMS Plumper, HMS Hecate and the Beaver from 1857 to 1870.

HMS <i>Grappler</i> (1856)

HMS Grappler was an Albacore-class gunboat of the Royal Navy. She served on what is now the British Columbia Coast from 1859 until sold into commercial service in 1868. She sank with significant loss of life as result of a fire in 1883.

<i>Beaver</i> (steamship) 1836 paddle steamer, first steamship in the North Pacific

Beaver was the first steamship to operate in the Pacific Northwest of North America. She made remote parts of the west coast of Canada accessible for maritime fur trading and was chartered by the Royal Navy for surveying the coastline of British Columbia. She served off the coast from 1836 until 1888, when she was wrecked.

See also

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Turnour Island is an island in the Johnstone Strait region of the Central Coast of British Columbia, located between Gilford Island and West Cracroft Island. On the other side Canoe Passage on its northwest is Village Island, while to its south and southwest is Beware Passage, across from which is Harbledown Island. Gilford Island is to the north across Tribune Channel. Separating Turnour from West Cracroft is Clio Channel.

East Cracroft Island is an island in the Johnstone Strait region of the Central Coast region of British Columbia, Canada. It is the smaller of the two Cracroft Islands, and at low tide is really one island with its larger neighbour, West Cracroft Island. On the south side of the shallows that form an isthmus between them at low tide is Port Harvey, which is a short, wide inlet or bay. On its east shore is Keecekiltum Indian Reserve No. 2, 11.7 ha., which is under the governance of the Tlowitsis Nation of the Kwakwaka'wakw peoples. at 50°33′00″N126°16′00″W.

Gwayasdums is a village of the Kwakwaka'wakw peoples on the west side of Gilford Island in the Johnstone Strait region of the Central Coast of British Columbia, Canada. The village, located on Retreat Pass, is on Gwayasdums Indian Reserve No. 1. Other spellings of the name are Kwaustums and gwa'yasdams and Gwa'yasdams and Gwa’yasdams.

Kye-yaa-la Indian Reserve No. 1, officially Kye-yaa-la 1, is an Indian reserve, comprising the whole of Sail Island and including three small islands, in Retreat Passage to the west of Gilford Island, and east of Bonwick Island in the Johnstone Strait region of the Central Coast of British Columbia, Canada. The reserve is 9.6 ha. in size and is under the administration of the Kwikwasut'inuxw Haxwa'mis First Nation band government.

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Drury inlet is an inlet in the Queen Charlotte Strait region of the Central Coast of British Columbia, Canada, extending west from Wells Passage to the northwest of North Broughton Island, northwest of the town of Port Hardy. Branching off to the northeast from the north side of the head of the inlet is Actaeon Sound.

Retreat Passage is a short strait and marine waterway between Gilford Island (E) and Bonwick Island (W) in the Broughton Archipelago of the eastern Queen Charlotte Strait region of the Central Coast of British Columbia, Canada.

Waddington Harbour is a harbour at the head of Bute Inlet in the Central Coast region of British Columbia, Canada. Also issuing into the head of Bute Inlet and Waddington Harbour, just west of the mouth of the Homathko, is the Teaquahan River. Issuing directly into the inlet a few miles south on the harbour's southeast is the Southgate River, one of the major rivers of the central Pacific Ranges, which begins on the west side of the Lillooet Icecap. Its lower valley adjacent to the inlet's shores is called Pigeon Valley.

References

Coordinates: 50°42′03″N126°38′31″W / 50.70083°N 126.64194°W / 50.70083; -126.64194 (Bonwick Island)

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.