Bosnia and Herzegovina women's national football team

Last updated
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Association Football Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina
Confederation UEFA (Europe)
Head coach Samira Hurem
Captain Amira Spahić
Most caps Sanela Grgić (15)
Top scorer Sabina Pehić (12)
Home stadium Bilino Polje
FIFA code BIH
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First colours
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Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 67 Increase2.svg 1 (12 July 2019) [1]
Highest58 (December 2016–March 2017)
Lowest95 (March 2007)
First international
Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia 11–0 Bosnia-Herz. Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina (1992-1998).svg
(Šaľa, Slovakia; 2 September 1997)
Biggest win
Bosnia and Herzegovina  Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg 7–1 Flag of Georgia.svg  Georgia
(Zenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina; 30 August 2019)
Biggest defeat
Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 13–0 Bosnia-Herz. Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg
(Bük, Hungary; 4 September 1999)

The Bosnia and Herzegovina women's national football team represents Bosnia and Herzegovina in international football and is controlled by the Football Association of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Bosnia and Herzegovina Republic in Southeast Europe

Bosnia and Herzegovina, abbreviated BiH or B&H, sometimes called Bosnia–Herzegovina and often known informally as Bosnia, is a country in Southeastern Europe, located within the Balkan Peninsula. Sarajevo is the capital and largest city.

Football Association of Bosnia and Herzegovina governing body of association football in Bosnia and Herzegovina

The Football Association of Bosnia and Herzegovina, based in Sarajevo, is the chief officiating body of football in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The Bosnian football association was founded as the Sarajevo football sub-association of Yugoslavia in 1920. In 1992 the association was re-founded as the football association of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Contents

They have never qualified for the World Cup or the European Championship. The team is currently coached by Samira Hurem and captained by veteran Mersiha Aščerić. Currently ranked 63rd by FIFA, the team plays their home games at the Asim Ferhatovic Hase Stadium in the city of Sarajevo, the country's capital.

FIFA Womens World Cup Association football competition for womens national teams

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China. Under the tournament's current format, national teams vie for 23 slots in a three-year qualification phase. The host nation's team is automatically entered as the 24th slot. The tournament proper, alternatively called the World Cup Finals, is contested at venues within the host nation(s) over a period of about one month.

UEFA Womens Championship European association football tournament for womens national teams

The UEFA European Women's Championship, also called the UEFA Women's Euro and unofficially the ‘European Cup’, held every fourth year, is the main competition in women's association football between national teams of the UEFA Confederation. The competition is the women's equivalent of the UEFA European Championship.

Samira Hurem is a Bosnian-Herzegovinian retired professional football player and current football manager. Since July 2010, she has been serving the position of head coach of Bosnian women's powerhouse SFK 2000. In the summer of 2011, she was named the new manager of the Bosnia and Herzegovina women's national football team.

Competitive record

FIFA Women's World Cup

FIFA Women's World Cup recordQualification record
YearRoundPldWDLGFGAGDPldWDLGFGAGD
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 1991 Did Not EnterDeclined Participation
Flag of Sweden.svg 1995
Flag of the United States.svg 1999 Did Not Qualify810755550
Flag of the United States.svg 2003 8107104636
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2007 62135127
Flag of Germany.svg 2011 800803030
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 2015 1023571912
Flag of France.svg 2019 710631613
Total0/6000000047743630178148

UEFA Women's Championship

UEFA Women's Championship recordQualification record
YearRoundPldWDLGFGAGDPldWDLGFGAGD
Flag of Denmark.svg 1991 Did Not EnterDeclined Participation
Flag of Italy.svg 1993
Flag of Germany.svg 1995
Flag of Norway.svg Flag of Sweden.svg 1997
Flag of Germany.svg 2001 Did Not Qualify600643228
Flag of England.svg 2005 821541915
Flag of Finland.svg 2009 3111176
Flag of Sweden.svg 2013 1031612219
Flag of the Netherlands.svg 2017 83058179
Total0/40000000359323299667

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup Qualifiers

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualificationFlag of England.svgFlag of Wales (1959-present).svgFlag of Russia.svgFlag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svgFlag of Kazakhstan.svg
1Flag of England.svg  England 8710291+2822 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup 0–0 6–0 4–0 5–0
2Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 852173+417 0–3 3–0 1–0 1–0
3Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 84131613+313 1–3 0–0 3–0 3–0
4Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg  Bosnia and Herzegovina 8107319163 [lower-alpha 1] 0–2 0–1 1–6 0–2
5Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan 8107221193 [lower-alpha 1] 0–6 0–1 0–3 0–2
Source: UEFA
Notes:
  1. 1 2 Head-to-head results: Kazakhstan 0–2 Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bosnia and Herzegovina 0–2 Kazakhstan (tied on head-to-head results, ranked on total goal difference).
Kazakhstan  Flag of Kazakhstan.svg0–2Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg  Bosnia and Herzegovina
Report
Astana Arena, Astana
Attendance: 100
Referee: Frida Nielsen (Denmark)

England  Flag of England.svg4–0Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg  Bosnia and Herzegovina
Report
Bescot Stadium, Walsall
Referee: Ewa Augustyn (Poland)

Bosnia and Herzegovina  Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg0–1Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales
Report
Bosnia and Herzegovina FA Training Centre, Zenica
Attendance: 500
Referee: Galiya Echeva (Bulgaria)

Bosnia and Herzegovina  Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg1–6Flag of Russia.svg  Russia
Report
Elena Danilova Footballer

Elena Yurievna Danilova is an international Russian football forward playing for Ryazan VDV.

Maria Galay is a Russian footballer who plays as a defender and has appeared for the Russia women's national team.

Elena Morozova Russian football player

Elena Igorevna Morozova is a Russian football midfielder, currently playing for Ryazan VDV in the Russian Championship. She previously played for Energiya Voronezh, FK Rossiyanka, Zorky Krasnogorsk and FK Kubanochka.


Bosnia and Herzegovina  Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg0–2Flag of England.svg  England
Report
Bosnia and Herzegovina FA Training Centre, Zenica
Attendance: 340
Referee: Andromachi Tsiofliki (Greece)

Wales  Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg1–0Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg  Bosnia and Herzegovina
Report
Liberty Stadium, Swansea
Attendance: 2,645
Referee: Sofia Karagiorgi (Cyprus)

Bosnia and Herzegovina  Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg0–2Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan
Report
Bosnia and Herzegovina FA Training Centre, Zenica
Attendance: 322
Referee: Reelika Turi (Estonia)

Russia  Flag of Russia.svg3–0Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg  Bosnia and Herzegovina
Report
Sapsan Arena, Moscow
Attendance: 374
Referee: Tanja Subotič (Slovenia)

Current squad

The following players were called up for 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup Q matches against England and Wales.

UEFA Group 1 of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification competition consisted of five teams: England, Russia, Wales, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Kazakhstan. The composition of the seven groups in the qualifying group stage was decided by the draw held on 25 April 2017, with the teams seeded according to their coefficient ranking.

England womens national football team womens national association football team representing England

The England women's national football team has been governed by the Football Association (FA) since 1993, having been previously administered by the Women's Football Association (WFA). England played its first international match in November 1972 against Scotland. Although most national football teams represent a sovereign state, as a member of the United Kingdom's Home Nations, England is permitted by FIFA statutes to maintain its own national side that competes in all major tournaments, with the exception of the Women's Olympic Football Tournament.

The Wales women's national football team represents Wales in international women's football. They have yet to qualify for the final stages of the World Cup or European Championships and are currently ranked 35th in the world and 20th in Europe. The team is run by the Football Association of Wales.

No.Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClub
11 GK Almina Hodžić (1988-11-02) 2 November 1988 (age 30) Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg SFK 2000 Sarajevo
121 GK Arnela Šabanović (1991-06-16) 16 June 1991 (age 28) Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg SFK 2000 Sarajevo

172 DF Amela Kršo (1991-04-17) 17 April 1991 (age 28) Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg SFK 2000 Sarajevo
42 DF Amira Spahić (captain) (1983-06-08) 8 June 1983 (age 36) Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg SFK 2000 Sarajevo
82 DF Aida Hadžić (1992-09-11) 11 September 1992 (age 26) Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg SFK 2000 Sarajevo
52 DF Melisa Hasanbegović (1995-04-13) 13 April 1995 (age 24) Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Slavia Praha
72 DF Anđela Šešlija (1995-09-15) 15 September 1995 (age 23) Flag of the United States.svg College of the Holy Cross
32 DF Antonela Radeljić (1996-12-09) 9 December 1996 (age 22) Flag of Croatia.svg Osijek
82 DF Marija Aleksić (1997-08-18) 18 August 1997 (age 22) Flag of Hungary.svg Ferencváros

3 MF Marina Lukić (1995-10-05) 5 October 1995 (age 23) Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg Iskra Bugojno
193 MF Selma Kapetanović (1996-12-09) 9 December 1996 (age 22) Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg SFK 2000 Sarajevo
133 MF Amna Lihović (1997-02-08) 8 February 1997 (age 22) Flag of Sweden.svg Mossens BK

114 FW Lidija Kuliš (1992-05-02) 2 May 1992 (age 27) Flag of Germany.svg FC Köln
94 FW Milena Nikolić (1992-07-06) 6 July 1992 (age 27) Flag of Germany.svg SC Sand
164 FW Alma Kamerić (1996-06-17) 17 June 1996 (age 23) Flag of Luxembourg.svg Schifflingen 95
24 FW Valentina Šakotić (1996-09-23) 23 September 1996 (age 22) Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg Radnik Bumerang
144 FW Dajana Spasojević (1997-10-29) 29 October 1997 (age 21) Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg SFK 2000 Sarajevo
184 FW Merjema Medić (1999-10-17) 17 October 1999 (age 19) Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg SFK 2000 Sarajevo
4 FW Nikolina Milović (2000-04-11) 11 April 2000 (age 19) Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg Radnik Bumerang

Recent callups

The following players have been called up for the team within the last twelve months:

Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClubLatest call-up
GK Tamara Škorić (1993-12-06) 6 December 1993 (age 25) Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg Banja Lukav. Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan, 21 October 2017
GK Arnela Begić (1993-02-18) 18 February 1993 (age 26) Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg Iskra Bugojnov. Flag of Jordan.svg  Jordan, 3 August 2017
GK Jelena Gvozderac (1998-08-11) 11 August 1998 (age 21) Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg Emina Mostarv. Flag of France.svg  France, 8 March 2017
GK Emina Omerović (1999-03-20) March 20, 1999 (age 20) Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg Fortuna Živinicev. Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia, 8 March 2017

DF Nikolina Vujadin (1995-11-03) 3 November 1995 (age 23) Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg Lokomotiva Brčkov. Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan, 21 October 2017
DF Aldina Hamzić (2000-03-20) 20 March 2000 (age 19) Flag of Austria.svg UFC Siezenheimv. Flag of Jordan.svg  Jordan, 3 August 2017
DF Nikolina Dijaković (1989-05-03) 3 May 1989 (age 30) Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg SFK 2000 Sarajevo v. Flag of France.svg  France, 8 March 2017
DF Jelena Milović (1992-10-08) 8 October 1992 (age 26) Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg Radnik Bumerangv. Flag of France.svg  France, 8 March 2017
DF Alma Jašarević (1994-04-14) 14 April 1994 (age 25) Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg SFK 2000 Sarajevo v. Flag of France.svg  France, 8 March 2017
DF Andrea Grebenar (1997-11-07) 7 November 1997 (age 21) Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg SFK 2000 Sarajevo v. Flag of France.svg  France, 8 March 2017

MF Zerina Piskić (1997-09-16) 16 September 1997 (age 21) Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg SFK 2000 Sarajevo v. Flag of Jordan.svg  Jordan, 3 August 2017
MF Minela Gačanica (2000-03-09) 9 March 2000 (age 19) Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg Emina Mostarv. Flag of Jordan.svg  Jordan, 3 August 2017
MF Lejla Bašić (1994-10-13) 13 October 1994 (age 24) Flag of Sweden.svg KIF Örebro DFF v. Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia, 9 June 2017
MF Branka Bagarić (2000-02-08) February 8, 2000 (age 19) Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg Široki Brijegv. Flag of France.svg  France, 8 March 2017

FW Irvina Bajramović (1995-02-27) 27 February 1995 (age 24) Flag of Sweden.svg Kopparbergs/Göteborg FC v. Flag of Jordan.svg  Jordan, 3 August 2017

Results and schedule

2016

2017

2018

See also

The Bosnia and Herzegovina women's national under-19 football team represents Bosnia and Herzegovina in international football in under-19 categories and is controlled by the Football Association of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

The Bosnia and Herzegovina women's national under-17 football team represents Bosnia and Herzegovina in international football in under-17 categories and is controlled by the Football Association of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

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References

  1. "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 12 July 2019. Retrieved 12 July 2019.