Cerro Mohinora

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Cerro Mohinora
CERRO DE MOHINORA.jpg
Highest point
Elevation 3,300 m (10,800 ft) [1] [2]
Prominence 873 m (2,864 ft)
Parent peak Cerro Gordo [3]
Listing Mountain peaks of Mexico
Coordinates 25°57′22″N107°02′52″W / 25.95611°N 107.04778°W / 25.95611; -107.04778 Coordinates: 25°57′22″N107°02′52″W / 25.95611°N 107.04778°W / 25.95611; -107.04778
Geography
Mexico Chihuahua location map.svg
Red triangle with thick white border.svg
Cerro Mohinora
Mexico
Mexico relief location map.jpg
Red triangle with thick white border.svg
Cerro Mohinora
Cerro Mohinora (Mexico)
Location Guadalupe y Calvo Municipality, Chihuahua, Mexico
Topo map Mountain Peak
Geology
Age of rock Paleogene
Mountain type Extinct
Volcanic arc/belt Sierra Madre Occidental

Cerro Mohinora is an extinct volcano that is part of the Sierra Madre Occidental mountain range in the Mexican state of Chihuahua located in the municipality of Guadalupe y Calvo. Cerro Mohinora is the highest point in the state of Chihuahua reaching an elevation of 10,827 ft (3,300 m) above sea level. The climate of the mountain is extremely cold in the winter and temperate to semi-cold in the summer.

Sierra Madre Occidental mountain range

The Sierra Madre Occidental is a major mountain range system of the North American Cordillera, that runs northwest–southeast through northwestern and western Mexico, and along the Gulf of California. The Sierra Madre is part of the American Cordillera, a chain of mountain ranges (cordillera) that consists of an almost continuous sequence of mountain ranges that form the western 'backbone' of North America, Central America, South America and West Antarctica.

Chihuahua (state) State of Mexico

Chihuahua, officially the Free and Sovereign State of Chihuahua, is one of the 31 states of Mexico. It is located in Northwestern Mexico and is bordered by the states of Sonora to the west, Sinaloa to the southwest, Durango to the south, and Coahuila to the east. To the north and northeast, it has a long border with the U.S. adjacent to the U.S. states of New Mexico and Texas. Its capital city is Chihuahua City.

Contents

Geology

The mountain began to form during Paleogene geologic period characterized by intense volcanic activity in the area throwing lava and ash onto the surrounding plateau and creating the Sierra Madre Occidental. Cerro Mohinora was raised to an elevation over 3,300 m above sea level during the Pleistocene by intense tectonic activity. The mountain is mainly composed of igneous rock.

The Paleogene is a geologic period and system that spans 43 million years from the end of the Cretaceous Period 66 million years ago (Mya) to the beginning of the Neogene Period 23.03 Mya. It is the beginning of the Cenozoic Era of the present Phanerozoic Eon. The Paleogene is most notable for being the time during which mammals diversified from relatively small, simple forms into a large group of diverse animals in the wake of the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event that ended the preceding Cretaceous Period. The United States Geological Survey uses the abbreviation PE for the Paleogene.

The Pleistocene is the geological epoch which lasted from about 2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago, spanning the world's most recent period of repeated glaciations. The end of the Pleistocene corresponds with the end of the last glacial period and also with the end of the Paleolithic age used in archaeology.

Climate

Using the Köppen climate classification the climate of the mountain is humid continental climate (Dfb). Summers are cool with temperatures rarely reaching 25 °C (77 °F) and summer lows fall below 10 °C (50 °F) regularly. There are heavy rainstorms from June to October. Winters are very cold with maximum high reaching 0 °C (32 °F) and reaching a maximum low of -31 °C (-24 °F). Winter snowstorms with high winds are common and typically over 1 meter (~3 ft) of snow per season.

Köppen climate classification widely used climate classification system

The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. It was first published by the Russian climatologist Wladimir Köppen (1846–1940) in 1884, with several later modifications by Köppen, notably in 1918 and 1936. Later, the climatologist Rudolf Geiger introduced some changes to the classification system, which is thus sometimes called the Köppen–Geiger climate classification system.

Humid continental climate Category in the Köppen climate classification system

A humid continental climate is a climatic region defined by Russo-German climatologist Wladimir Köppen in 1900, typified by large seasonal temperature differences, with warm to hot summers and cold winters. Precipitation is usually distributed throughout the year. The definition of this climate regarding temperature is as follows: the mean temperature of the coldest month must be below −3 °C (26.6 °F) and there must be at least four months whose mean temperatures are at or above 10 °C (50 °F). In addition, the location in question must not be semi-arid or arid. The Dfb, Dwb and Dsb subtypes are also known as hemiboreal.

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References

  1. "Perspectiva Estadística de Chihuahua" (PDF). Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía (INEGI). 2010. p. 10.
  2. The elevation given by INEGI mapping is 3,300 m.
  3. http://www.peakbagger.com/list.aspx?lid=12010