Claire Eagan

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  1. Her middle initial stands for Veronica, which was not given to her at birth, but which she added later as a young woman when she took the sacrament of communion at her Confirmation. [2]
  2. Eagan said later, "I moved here with the intention of staying one year, but I've stayed almost 26 years. Once I got here, I loved it." [2]
  3. Eagan met Judge Fred Nelson, formerly chief judge on the Tulsa County District Court, but by 1978 was the head of litigation at Hall Estill. Nelson interviewed her for the job, became her supervisor and acted as her mentor until he died in July, 1987. Eagan told an interviewer in 2002, that Nelson was her ethical role model, and that he told her, "... you can't change the facts. All you can do is argue the facts and the law, and fight for the your client the best way you can." [2]
  4. Part of the notice is incorrect, because Garland's nomination to the U. S. Supreme Court failed when the U.S. Senate refused to consider any nomination to that court by President Obama during 2012, his last year in office. Hence, Garland remained on the D.C. Circuit Court.

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References

  1. Panic Button. "Small Town Girl Living in a Violent World | 2".
  2. 1 2 3 McGuigan, Patrick B. "On Judge Eagan's middle name." NewsOK. January 27, 2002. Accessed May 16, 2018.
  3. 1 2 3 "Eagan, Claire." FJC Bio Accessed May 16, 2018.
  4. "AFFIDAVIT OF CLAIRE V. EAGAN, page 9" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2021-12-18.
  5. Panic Button. "Manipulating the Truth | 9".
  6. "Larry Morris' goal is not being in other's life". Tulsa World. Mar 15, 2011.
  7. "The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court: 2013 Membership". Federation of American Scientists . Retrieved June 9, 2013.
  8. 1 2 3 4 Weiss, Debra Cassens (September 18, 2013). "Surveillance court releases new opinion upholding NSA collection of phone data". ABA Journal. Retrieved September 25, 2013.
  9. Savage, Charlie (September 17, 2013). "Extended Ruling by Secret Court Backs Collection of Phone Data". New York Times.
  10. "U.S. FISC Amended Memorandum Opinion" . Retrieved August 29, 2013.
  11. U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Oklahoma. Press Release. February 21, 2020. Accessed March 20, 2020.
Claire V. Eagan
Claire Eagan District Judge.jpg
Judge of the United States Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court
In office
February 13, 2013 May 18, 2019
Legal offices
Preceded byJudge of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Oklahoma
2001–present
Incumbent
Preceded byJudge of the United States Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court
2013–2019
Succeeded by