Terence C. Kern

Last updated
Terence C. Kern
Senior Judge of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Oklahoma
Assumed office
January 4, 2010
Chief Judge of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Oklahoma
In office
1996–2003
Preceded by Thomas Rutherford Brett
Succeeded by Sven Erik Holmes
Judge of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Oklahoma
In office
June 9, 1994 January 4, 2010
Appointed by Bill Clinton
Preceded bySeat established by 104 Stat. 5089
Succeeded by John E. Dowdell
Personal details
Born
Terence C. Kern

1944 (age 7677)
Clinton, Oklahoma
Education Oklahoma State University (B.S.)
University of Oklahoma College of Law (J.D.)
University of Virginia School of Law (LL.M.)

Terence C. Kern (born 1944) is a Senior United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Oklahoma.

Contents

Education and career

Born in Clinton, Oklahoma, Kern received a Bachelor of Science degree from Oklahoma State University in 1966, a Juris Doctor from the University of Oklahoma College of Law in 1969, and a Master of Laws in Judicial Process from the University of Virginia School of Law in 2004. He was in the Oklahoma Army National Guard from 1969 to 1970 and the United States Army Reserve from 1969 to 1975. He was a general attorney of the Federal Trade Commission, Division of Compliance, Bureau of Deceptive Practices from 1969 to 1970. He was in private practice in Ardmore, Oklahoma from 1970 to 1994.

Federal judicial service

On March 9, 1994, Kern was nominated by President Bill Clinton to a new seat on the United States District Court for the Northern District of Oklahoma created by 104 Stat. 5089. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on June 8, 1994, and received his commission on June 9, 1994. He served as chief judge from 1996 to 2003. He assumed senior status on January 4, 2010.

Notable case

On January 14, 2014, Judge Kern held that the Oklahoma Constitution's definition of marriage as limited to "the union of one man and one woman" violates the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. The suit, Bishop v. Oklahoma , had been filed by two lesbian couples against the Tulsa County Clerk and others. The ruling has been stayed pending appeal. [1] The amendment banning same-sex marriage was passed by the voters in 2004, and its legislative history was cited in the ruling. [2]

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References

  1. Juliet Elperin (January 14, 2014). "Federal judge rules Oklahoma's same-sex marriage ban unconstitutional". Washington Post.
  2. "Bishop v. Oklahoma, January 14, 2014" (PDF).

Sources

Legal offices
Preceded by
Seat established by 104 Stat. 5089
Judge of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Oklahoma
1994–2010
Succeeded by
John E. Dowdell
Preceded by
Thomas Rutherford Brett
Chief Judge of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Oklahoma
1996–2003
Succeeded by
Sven Erik Holmes