Clifford Stein

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Clifford Stein
CliffordStein2010.jpg
Born
Clifford Seth Stein [1]

(1965-12-14) December 14, 1965 (age 54)
Nationality American
Alma mater Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Princeton University
Scientific career
Fields Computer Science
Institutions Columbia University
Dartmouth College
Thesis Approximation Algorithms for Multicommodity Flow and Shop Scheduling Problems (1992)
Doctoral advisor David Shmoys

Clifford Seth Stein (born December 14, 1965), a computer scientist, is a professor of industrial engineering and operations research at Columbia University in New York, NY, where he also holds an appointment in the Department of Computer Science. Stein is chair of the Industrial Engineering and Operations Research Department at Columbia University. Prior to joining Columbia, Stein was a professor at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire.

Contents

Stein's research interests include the design and analysis of algorithms, combinatorial optimization, operations research, network algorithms, scheduling, algorithm engineering and computational biology.

Stein has published many influential papers in the leading conferences and journals in his fields of research, and has occupied a variety of editorial positions including in the journals ACM Transactions on Algorithms, Mathematical Programming, Journal of Algorithms, SIAM Journal on Discrete Mathematics and Operations Research Letters. His work has been funded by the National Science Foundation and the Sloan Foundation. As of November 1, 2015, his publications have been cited over 46,000 times, and he has an h-index of 42. [2]

Stein is the winner of several prestigious awards including an NSF Career Award, an Alfred Sloan Research Fellowship and the Karen Wetterhahn Award for Distinguished Creative or Scholarly Achievement. He is also the co-author of two textbooks:

Stein earned his B.S.E. from Princeton University in 1987, a Master of Science from The Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1989, and a PhD also from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1992. [3] [4]

In recent years, Stein has built up close ties with the Norwegian research community which earned him an honorary doctorate from the University of Oslo (May 2010).

Bibliography

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References