Thomas H. Cormen

Last updated
Thomas H. Cormen
Born1956
Residence U.S.
Nationality American
Alma mater Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Princeton University
Scientific career
Fields Computer Science
Institutions Dartmouth College
Doctoral advisor Charles E. Leiserson

Thomas H. Cormen [1] is the co-author of Introduction to Algorithms , along with Charles Leiserson, Ron Rivest, and Cliff Stein. In 2013, he published a new book titled Algorithms Unlocked . He is a professor of computer science at Dartmouth College and former Chairman of the Dartmouth College Department of Computer Science. Between 2004 and 2008 he directed the Dartmouth College Writing Program. [2] His research interests are algorithm engineering, parallel computing, speeding up computations with high latency.

<i>Introduction to Algorithms</i> algorithms textbook

Introduction to Algorithms is a book on computer programming by Thomas H. Cormen, Charles E. Leiserson, Ronald L. Rivest, and Clifford Stein. The book has been widely used as the textbook for algorithms courses at many universities and is commonly cited as a reference for algorithms in published papers, with over 10,000 citations documented on CiteSeerX. The book sold half a million copies during its first 20 years. Its fame has led to the common use of the abbreviation "CLRS", or, in the first edition, "CLR".

Ron Rivest American cryptographer

Ronald Linn Rivest is a cryptographer and an Institute Professor at MIT. He is a member of MIT's Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) and a member of MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL). He was a member of the Election Assistance Commission's Technical Guidelines Development Committee, tasked with assisting the EAC in drafting the Voluntary Voting System Guidelines.

Clifford Stein American computer scientist

Clifford Seth Stein, a computer scientist, is a professor of industrial engineering and operations research at Columbia University in New York, NY, where he also holds an appointment in the Department of Computer Science. Stein is chair of the Industrial Engineering and Operations Research Department at Columbia University. Prior to joining Columbia, Stein was a professor at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire.

Contents

Early life and education

Thomas H. Cormen was born in New York City in 1956. He grew up in Oceanside, New York.

New York City Largest city in the United States

The City of New York, usually called either New York City (NYC) or simply New York (NY), is the most populous city in the United States. With an estimated 2018 population of 8,398,748 distributed over a land area of about 302.6 square miles (784 km2), New York is also the most densely populated major city in the United States. Located at the southern tip of the state of New York, the city is the center of the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass and one of the world's most populous megacities, with an estimated 19,979,477 people in its 2018 Metropolitan Statistical Area and 22,679,948 residents in its Combined Statistical Area. A global power city, New York City has been described as the cultural, financial, and media capital of the world, and exerts a significant impact upon commerce, entertainment, research, technology, education, politics, tourism, art, fashion, and sports. The city's fast pace has inspired the term New York minute. Home to the headquarters of the United Nations, New York is an important center for international diplomacy.

Oceanside, New York Hamlet and census-designated place in New York, United States

Oceanside is a hamlet and census-designated place (CDP) located in the southern part of the town of Hempstead, Nassau County, New York. The population was 32,109 at the 2010 census.

He received his bachelor's degree summa cum laude in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from Princeton University in June 1978. [3]

A bachelor's degree or baccalaureate is an undergraduate academic degree awarded by colleges and universities upon completion of a course of study lasting three to seven years. In some institutions and educational systems, some bachelor's degrees can only be taken as graduate or postgraduate degrees after a first degree has been completed. In countries with qualifications frameworks, bachelor's degrees are normally one of the major levels in the framework, although some qualifications titled bachelor's degrees may be at other levels and some qualifications with non-bachelor's titles may be classified as bachelor's degrees.

Princeton University University in Princeton, New Jersey

Princeton University is a private Ivy League research university in Princeton, New Jersey. Founded in 1746 in Elizabeth as the College of New Jersey, Princeton is the fourth-oldest institution of higher education in the United States and one of the nine colonial colleges chartered before the American Revolution. The institution moved to Newark in 1747, then to the current site nine years later, and renamed itself Princeton University in 1896.

He then went to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he earned his master's degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in May 1986 with a thesis on "Concentrator Switches for Routing Messages in Parallel Computers" [3] and his PhD with a thesis on "Virtual Memory for Data-Parallel Computing" [4] in February 1993. [3]

Massachusetts Institute of Technology University in Massachusetts

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is a private research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Institute is a land-grant, sea-grant, and space-grant university, with an urban campus that extends more than a mile (1.6 km) alongside the Charles River. The Institute also encompasses a number of major off-campus facilities such as the MIT Lincoln Laboratory, the Bates Center, and the Haystack Observatory, as well as affiliated laboratories such as the Broad and Whitehead Institutes. Founded in 1861 in response to the increasing industrialization of the United States, MIT adopted a European polytechnic university model and stressed laboratory instruction in applied science and engineering. It has since played a key role in the development of many aspects of modern science, engineering, mathematics, and technology, and is widely known for its innovation and academic strength, making it one of the most prestigious institutions of higher learning in the world.

A master's degree is an academic degree awarded by universities or colleges upon completion of a course of study demonstrating mastery or a high-order overview of a specific field of study or area of professional practice. A master's degree normally requires previous study at the bachelor's level, either as a separate degree or as part of an integrated course. Within the area studied, master's graduates are expected to possess advanced knowledge of a specialized body of theoretical and applied topics; high order skills in analysis, critical evaluation, or professional application; and the ability to solve complex problems and think rigorously and independently.

From July 2004 through June 2008, he was the director of the Dartmouth Institute for Writing and Rhetoric.

Honors and awards

During his career he received several honors and awards: [3]

Bibliography

Notes

  1. The middle name is just 'H.'
  2. The actual title was:
    • 2004-2005: Director of the Dartmouth College Writing Program
    • 2005-2008: Chair of the Dartmouth College Writing Program
    • 2008: Director of the Dartmouth College Institute for Writing and Rhetoric
    • 2008: Chair of the Dartmouth College Writing and Rhetoric Program (the curricular component of the Institute)
  3. 1 2 3 4 "Thomas H. Cormen profile" (PDF). cs.dartmouth.edu. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 6, 2011. Retrieved 2 September 2012.
  4. "Thomas H. Cormen, Virtual Memory for Data-Parallel Computing, MIT, 1992" (PDF). cs.dartmouth.edu. Retrieved 2 September 2012.


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