Duke Blue Devils women's basketball

Last updated
Duke Blue Devils
Basketball current event.svg 2021–22 Duke Blue Devils women's basketball team
Duke Athletics logo.svg
UniversityDuke University
All-time record.691
Head coach Kara Lawson (2nd season)
Conference Atlantic Coast Conference
Location Durham, North Carolina
Arena Cameron Indoor Stadium
(Capacity: 9,314)
NicknameBlue Devils
Student section Cameron Crazies
ColorsDuke blue and white [1]
   
Uniforms
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Home
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Away
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Alternate
NCAA Tournament Runner-up
1999, 2006
NCAA Tournament Final Four
1999, 2002, 2003, 2006
NCAA Tournament Elite Eight
1998, 1999, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013
NCAA Tournament Sweet Sixteen
1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2015, 2018
NCAA Tournament Appearances
1987, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2017, 2018
Conference tournament champions
2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2010, 2011, 2013
Conference regular season champions
1998, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

The Duke Blue Devils women's basketball team is the college basketball program representing Duke University in the Atlantic Coast Conference of NCAA Division I.

Contents

Team history

Tip off of a Duke women's game Duke women's basketball 12172013.jpg
Tip off of a Duke women's game

In 1974, Duke hired Emma Jean Howard to teach physical education, and to serve as the head coach of the women's basketball and volleyball teams. Initially, women's basketball was played as a club sport. In the first season, 1974–75, the team played locally, finishing second in the state with a 6–7 record. The women's athletic department merged with the men's athletics in 1975, and the second year is considered as the first official season of the program as a varsity sport. Howard remained as the head coach for the next two years. In 1977, Howard remained as the volleyball coach, while Duke moved up to Division I and hired Debbie Leonard to be the head coach of the women's basketball program. [2]

Duke in the WNBA

Many Duke Women's Basketball players have continued their basketball careers professionally through the WNBA and overseas. As of 2016, 10 former Blue Devils were represented on WNBA Teams. Among those Duke alums include, Mistie Bass ('06, Phoenix Mercury), Alana Beard (‘04, Los Angeles Sparks), Karima Christmas-Kelly (‘11, Minnesota Lynx), Monique Currie ('06, Washington Mystics), Chelsea Gray ('14, Los Angeles Sparks), Lindsey Harding (‘07, Phoenix Mercury), Tricia Liston ('14, Minnesota Lynx), Haley Peters ('14, Atlanta Dream), Jasmine Thomas (‘11, Connecticut Sun), Krystal Thomas (‘11, Washington Mystics), and Elizabeth Williams ('15, Atlanta Dream). [3]

The Minnesota Lynx were crowned WNBA champs in 2015 with Tricia Liston on the roster. [4] In 2016, the Los Angeles Sparks won the WNBA championship with Alana Beard and Chelsea Gray on the roster. [5]

Duke Women's Basketball Overseas

Duke Women's Basketball has 14 former players playing professionally overseas in the 2016–2017 season. The former Blue Devils playing overseas include, Alana Beard (Duke ‘04, Avenida, Spain), Chante Black (Duke '09, Ramat Hasharon, Israel), Karima Christmas (Duke ‘11, Winnus, South Korea), Monique Currie (Duke ‘06, Woori Bank, South Korea), Chelsea Gray (Duke '14, Abdullah Gul, Turkey), Lindsey Harding (Duke ‘07, Besiktas, Turkey), Haley Peters (Duke ‘14, Girona, Spain), Angela Salvadores (Duke '16, Avenida, Spain), Kathleen Scheer (Duke '12, Hobart Chargers, Australia), Shay Selby (Duke '12, Bodrum, Turkey), Jasmine Thomas (Duke ‘11, Ramat Hasharon), Allison Vernerey (Duke '13, A.S.V. Basket, France), Chloe Wells (Duke ‘14, Araski, Spain), and Elizabeth Williams (Duke '15, Nadezhda Orenburg, Russia). [3]

Year by year

Source: [6] [7] [8]

SeasonTeamOverallConferenceStandingPostseasonCoaches' pollAP poll
Emma Jean Howard (Independent)(1975–1978)
1975–76Emma Jean Howard 0–14
1976–77Emma Jean Howard 2–12NCAIAW Tournament
Emma Jean Howard:2–26
Debbie Leonard (ACC)(1977–1992)
1977–78 Debbie Leonard 1–190–87thNCAIAW Tournament
1978–79 Debbie Leonard 11–113–65thNCAIAW Tournament
1979–80 Debbie Leonard 14–135–5T-4thNCAIAW Tournament
1980–81 Debbie Leonard 11–143–66thNCAIAW Tournament
1981–82 Debbie Leonard 14–153–86thAIAW Region II Tournament
1982–83 Debbie Leonard 15–106–74th
1983–84 Debbie Leonard 13–145–96th
1984–85 Debbie Leonard 19–87–75th
1985–86 Debbie Leonard 21–99–53rdNWIT Fourth Place
1986–87 Debbie Leonard 19–107–74thNCAA Second Round (Play-In)
1987–88 Debbie Leonard 17–115–95th
1988–89 Debbie Leonard 12–162–127th
1989–90 Debbie Leonard 15–134–10T-6th
1990–91 Debbie Leonard 16–126–85th
1991–92 Debbie Leonard 14–154–128th
Debbie Leonard:212–19069–119
Gail Goestenkors (ACC)(1992–2007)
1992–93Gail Goestenkors 12–153–139th
1993–94Gail Goestenkors 16–117–95th
1994–95Gail Goestenkors 22–910–64thNCAA Second Round1720
1995–96Gail Goestenkors 26–712–42ndNCAA Second Round1913
1996–97Gail Goestenkors 19–119–7T-3rdNCAA Second Round
1997–98Gail Goestenkors 24–813–31stNCAA Elite Eight78
1998–99Gail Goestenkors 29–715–11stNCAA Runner-up1010
1999–2000Gail Goestenkors 28–612–42nd#NCAA Sweet Sixteen1110
2000–01Gail Goestenkors 30–413–31st#NCAA Sweet Sixteen85
2001–02Gail Goestenkors 31–416–01st#NCAA Final Four43
2002–03Gail Goestenkors 35–216–01st#NCAA Final Four42
2003–04Gail Goestenkors 30–415–11st#NCAA Elite Eight51
2004–05Gail Goestenkors 31–512–2T-1stNCAA Elite Eight87
2005–06Gail Goestenkors 31–412–2T-2ndNCAA Runner-up24
2006–07Gail Goestenkors 32–214–01stNCAA Sweet Sixteen61
Gail Goestenkors:396–99179–55
Joanne P. McCallie (ACC)(2007–2020)
2007–08Joanne P. McCallie 25–1010–4T-3rdNCAA Sweet Sixteen99
2008–09Joanne P. McCallie 27–611–33rdNCAA Second Round146
2009–10Joanne P. McCallie 30–612–2T-1st#NCAA Elite Eight66
2010–11Joanne P. McCallie 32–412–2T-1st#NCAA Elite Eight76
2011–12Joanne P. McCallie 27–615–11stNCAA Elite Eight66
2012–13Joanne P. McCallie 33–317–11st#NCAA Elite Eight55
2013–14Joanne P. McCallie 28–712–4T-2ndNCAA Second Round910
2014–15Joanne P. McCallie 23–1111–5T-4thNCAA Sweet Sixteen1612
2015–16Joanne P. McCallie 20–128–8T-7th------
2016–17Joanne P. McCallie 28–613–3T-2ndNCAA Second Round99
2017–18Joanne P. McCallie 24–911–5T-4thNCAA Sweet Sixteen2012
2018–19Joanne P. McCallie 15–156–10T-10th
2019–20Joanne P. McCallie 18–1212–63rdPostseason cancelledRVRV
Joanne P. McCallie:330–107150–56
Kara Lawson (ACC)(2020–present)
2020–21Kara Lawson 3–10–1Opted out due to COVID-19
2021–22Kara Lawson 17–137–1110th
Kara Lawson:20–147–12
Total:960–436

      National champion        Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion        Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion      Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

NCAA tournament results

Duke has appeared in 24 NCAA tournaments with a record of 58-24.

YearSeedRoundOpponentResult
1987 #7First Round
Second Round
#10 Manhattan
#2 Rutgers
W 70-55
L 78-64
1995 #5First Round
Second Round
#12 Oklahoma State
#4 Alabama
W 76-64
L 121-120 (4OT)
1996 #4First Round
Second Round
#13 James Madison
#12 San Francisco
W 85-53
L 64-60
1997 #5First Round
Second Round
#12 DePaul
#4 Illinois
W 70-56
L 67-65
1998 #2First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#15 Middle Tennessee State
#10 Louisville
#3 Florida
#9 Arkansas
W 92-67
W 69-53
W 71-58
L 77-72
1999 #3First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
Championship
#14 Holy Cross
#11 St. Joseph's
#2 Old Dominion
#1 Tennessee
#3 Georgia
#1 Purdue
W 79-51
W 66-60
W 76-63
W 69-63
W 81-69
L 62-45
2000 #2First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#15 Campbell
#10 Western Kentucky
#3 LSU
W 71-42
W 90-70
L 79-66
2001 #1First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#16 Milwaukee
#9 Arkansas
#5 SW Missouri State
W 95-63
W 75-54
L 81-71
2002 #1First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#16 Norfolk State
#8 TCU
#4 Texas
#3 USC
#1 Oklahoma
W 95-48
W 76-66
W 62-46
W 77-68
L 86-71
2003 #1First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#16 Georgia State
#8 Utah
#5 Georgia
#2 Texas Tech
#1 Tennessee
W 66-48
W 65-54
W 66-63
W 80-79
L 56-66
2004 #1First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#16 Northwestern State
#9 Marquette
#5 Louisiana Tech
#7 Minnesota
W 103-51
W 76-67
W 63-49
L 82-75
2005 #2First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#15 Canisius
#7 Boston College
#6 Georgia
#1 LSU
W 80-48
W 70-65
W 63-57
L 59-49
2006 #1First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
Championship
#16 Southern
#8 USC
#4 Michigan State
#2 Connecticut
#1 LSU
#1 Maryland
W 96-27
W 85-51
W 86-61
W 63-61 (OT)
W 64-45
L 78-75 (OT)
2007 #1First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#16 Holy Cross
#8 Temple
#4 Rutgers
W 81-44
W 62-52
L 53-52
2008 #3First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#14 Murray State
#6 Arizona State
#3 Texas A&M
W 78-57
W 67-59
L 77-63
2009 #1First Round
Second Round
#16 Austin Peay
#9 Michigan State
W 83-42
L 63-49
2010 #2First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#15 Hampton
#7 LSU
#11 San Diego State
#4 Baylor
W 72-37
W 60-52
W 66-58
L 51-48
2011 #2First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#15 Tennessee-Martin
#10 Marist
#3 DePaul
#1 Connecticut
W 90-45
W 71-66
W 70-63
L 75-40
2012 #2First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#15 Samford
#7 Vanderbilt
#3 St. John's
#1 Stanford
W 82-47
W 96-80
W 74-47
L 81-69
2013 #2First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#15 Hampton
#7 Oklahoma State
#6 Nebraska
#1 Notre Dame
W 67-51
W 68-59
W 53-45
L 87-76
2014 #2First Round
Second Round
#15 Winthrop
#7 DePaul
W 87-45
L 74-65
2015 #4First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#13 Albany
#5 Mississippi State
#1 Maryland
W 54-52
W 64-56
L 65-55
2017 #2First Round
Second Round
#15 Hampton
#10 Oregon
W 94-31
L 74-65
2018 #5First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#12 Belmont
#4 Georgia
#1 Connecticut
W 72-58
W 66-40
L 72-59

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References

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  3. 1 2 "Forever DWB" . Retrieved 12 Apr 2017.
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