Famous Impostors

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Famous Impostors
FamousImpostors.jpg
First British edition (Sidgwick & Jackson, printed in the US) [1]
Author Bram Stoker
LanguageEnglish
PublisherSturgis & Walton (US)
Publication date
November 1910 [2]
Media typePrint (hardcover)

Famous Impostors is the last of four non-fiction books completed by Bram Stoker, the author of Dracula . [3] It features numerous historical impostors and hoaxes.

Contents

The first edition was published by the Sturgis & Walton Company of New York in November 1910, stated on the copyright page. [2] The British edition was published by Sidgwick & Jackson of London, also dated 1910, but printed in the United States [1] Printed pages of the two editions appear to be identical, following the title leaf. [1] [2] Newspaper and magazine coverage implies that it was published in January 1911. [4]

Contents

Dashed (—) annotations are by Wikipedia.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 Copyright page. Full view of the UK edition, London: Sidgwick & Jackson, 1910 (original from University of Wisconsin–Madison). HathiTrust Digital Library.
  2. 1 2 3 Copyright page. Full view of the US edition, New York: Sturgis & Walton, 1910 (original from University of California–Berkeley). HathiTrust Digital Library.
  3. "Bram Stoker". Bibliography with numerous front cover images and price data. Fantastic Fiction.
  4. Famous Impostors title listing at the Internet Speculative Fiction Database.