Goetta (horse)

Last updated
Goetta
Breed Quarter Horse
Discipline Racing
Sire Go Man Go
Grandsire Top Deck (TB)
DamEtta Leo
Maternal grandsire Leo
Sex Mare
Foaled1961
CountryUnited States
Color Sorrel
BreederEd Honnen
OwnerHugh Huntley
Record
31-22-2-1
Earnings
$233,922.00
Major wins
All American Futurity
Awards
1964 World Champion Quarter Running Horse, 1963 AQHA High Money Earning Race Horse, 1965 Champion Quarter Running Aged Mare
Honors
American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame
Last updated on: January 12, 2008.

Goetta was the World Champion Quarter Running Horse for 1964, and for a time led the list of all time money-earning Quarter Horse racehorses. [1]

Contents

Life

Goetta was a 1961 sorrel foal, sired by Go Man Go and out of a daughter of Leo named Etta Leo. [2] Her dam was out of a daughter of Band Play, and the third dam descended from Peter McCue [3]

Sorrel (horse)

Sorrel is a distinctly different color from the chestnut, and one of the most common equine coat colors in horses. While the term is usually used only to refer to the copper-red version like chestnut, up until recently it was used solely in place of "chestnut" in the United States to refer to any reddish horse with a same-color or lighter mane and tail, ranging from reddish-gold to a deep burgundy or chocolate shade lacking the brownish tint of the true chestnut. The term probably comes from the color of the flower spike of the sorrel herb.

Go Man Go Quarter horse champion stallion

Go Man Go (1953–1983) was an American Quarter Horse stallion and race horse. He was named World Champion Quarter Running Horse three times in a row, one of only two horses to achieve that distinction. Go Man Go was considered to be of difficult temperament. While waiting in the starting gate for his very first race, he threw his jockey, broke down the gate, and ran alone around the track; he was eventually caught and went on to win the race. During his five years of competition until his retirement from racing in 1960 he had 27 wins, earning more than $86,000.

Leo (1940–1967) was one of the most influential Quarter Horse sires in the early years of the American Quarter Horse Association.

Racing career

Goetta raced for three years, with thirty-one starts. She won twenty-two of her starts, placing second twice and was third twice. The American Quarter Horse Association (or AQHA) named her the 1964 World Champion Quarter Running Horse, as well as the 1965 Champion Quarter Running Aged Mare and the 1963 Champion Quarter Running Two Year Old Filly. Her total earnings on the track were $233,920.00 and sixty-eight racing points. Besides the Championship titles, she also was a Race Register of Merit earner with an AAAT speed rating, and an AQHA Superior Race Horse. [2] She won the All American Futurity, among other stakes wins. [4]

American Quarter Horse Association American horse breed registry for Quarter Horses

The American Quarter Horse Association (AQHA), based in Amarillo, Texas, is an international organization dedicated to the preservation, improvement and record-keeping of the American Quarter Horse. The association sanctions many competitive events and maintains the official registry. The organization also houses the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame and Museum and sponsors educational programs. The organization was founded in 1940 in Fort Worth, Texas and now has nearly 234,627 members, over 32,000 of which are international.

Speed index is a system of rating the performance of Quarter Horse racehorses. The American Quarter Horse Association has used two systems over the history of Quarter Horse racing to evaluate racing performances. The original system used a letter grade, starting at D, then C, B, A and the highest AA. Later AAA was tacked on the top, and later still AAAT was made the top speed. Eventually, this system became too cumbersome, and a new system was introduced: the Speed Index system, which used a number system, with 100 being roughly equivalent to the old AAAT. This change occurred in 1969.

All American Futurity Race for two-year-old Quarter Horses in New Mexico, US

The All American Futurity is a race for two-year-old American Quarter Horse racehorses run at Ruidoso Downs Race Track in Ruidoso Downs, New Mexico on Labor Day. It is the last leg of the AQHA Triple Crown that has only been won once, by Special Effort in 1981. A $4 million bonus was once offered to the horse that could sweep all three Triple Crown races. It started in 1959, with a purse of $129,686.85. It has always billed itself as the richest race in American Quarter Horse racing, In 1978, the purse was over a million dollars and in 1982, the winner's portion of the purse totaled over a million dollars for the first time. The 2015 version of the race will have a purse of $3,000,000 with the winners share being $1,500,000, making it one of the richest races in North America.

Breeding record and honors

She produced seven foals, six of whom were race winners with two of those being stakes winners. She died in 1978 giving birth to her seventh foal. [4]

Foal A horse of either sex up to the age of one year

A foal is an equine up to one year old; this term is used mainly for horses. More specific terms are colt for a male foal and filly for a female foal, and are used until the horse is three or four. When the foal is nursing from its great (mother), it may also be called a "suckling". After it has been weaned from its dam, it may be called a "weanling". When a mare is pregnant, she is said to be "in foal". When the mare gives birth, she is "foaling", and the impending birth is usually stated as "to foal". A newborn horse is "foaled".

She was inducted into the AQHA Hall of Fame in 2007. [5]

The American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame and Museum was created by the American Quarter Horse Association (AQHA), based in Amarillo, Texas. Ground breaking construction of the Hall of Fame Museum began in 1989.The distinction is earned by people and horses who have contributed to the growth of the American Quarter Horse and "have been outstanding over a period of years in a variety of categories". In 1982, Bob Denhardt and Ernest Browning were the first individuals to receive the honor of being inducted into the AQHA Hall of Fame. In 1989, Wimpy P-1, King P-234, Leo and Three Bars were the first horses inducted into the AQHA Hall of Fame.

Pedigree

Equipoise (TB)
Equestrian (TB)
Frilette (TB)
Top Deck (TB)
Chicaro (TB)
River Boat (TB)
Last Boat (TB)
Go Man Go
Wise Counsellor (TB)
Very Wise (TB)
Omona (TB)
Lightfoot Sis
The Dun Horse
Clear Track
Ella
Goetta
Joe Reed P-3
Joe Reed II
Nellene
Leo
Joe Reed P-3
Little Fanny
Fanny Ashwell
Etta Leo
Band TIme (TB)
Band Play
Fair Play
Bandette
Sam Watkins
J T 6
Mamie

Notes

  1. Nye Great Moments in Quarter Racing History p. 202-205
  2. 1 2 Wagoner Quarter Racing Digest p. 437
  3. Goetta Pedigree at All Breed Pedigree retrieved on June 30, 2007
  4. 1 2 "Hall of Fame 2007" Quarter Horse Journal p. 51
  5. American Quarter Horse Association (AQHA). "Goetta". AQHA Hall of Fame. American Quarter Horse Association. Retrieved September 1, 2017.

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References

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