Hugo Award for Best Professional Magazine

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Hugo Award for Best Professional Magazine
Awarded for The best professional magazine devoted primarily to science fiction or fantasy
Presented by World Science Fiction Society
First awarded 1953
Last awarded 1972
Website thehugoawards.org

The Hugo Awards are given every year by the World Science Fiction Society for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The award is named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories , and was once officially known as the Science Fiction Achievement Award. [1] The award has been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing". [2] [3] The Hugo Award for Best Professional Magazine was given each year for professionally edited magazines related to science fiction or fantasy, published in English, and which has published four or more issues with at least one issue appearing in the previous calendar year. [4] Awards are also given out for non-professional magazines in the fanzine category, and for semi-professional magazines in the semiprozine category.

Hugo Award Literary awards for science fiction or fantasy

The Hugo Awards are a set of literary awards given annually for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The awards are named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and were officially named the Science Fiction Achievement Awards until 1992. Organized and overseen by the World Science Fiction Society, the awards are given each year at the annual World Science Fiction Convention as the central focus of the event. They were first given in 1953, at the 11th World Science Fiction Convention, and have been awarded every year since 1955. Over the years that the award has been given, the categories presented have changed; currently Hugo Awards are given in more than a dozen categories, and include both written and dramatic works of various types.

Science fiction Genre of speculative fiction

Science fiction is a genre of speculative fiction, typically dealing with imaginative and futuristic concepts such as advanced science and technology, space exploration, time travel, and extraterrestrial life. Science fiction often explores the potential consequences of scientific and other innovations, and has been called a "literature of ideas."

Fantasy genre of literature, film, television and other artforms

Fantasy is a genre of speculative fiction set in a fictional universe, often inspired by real world myth and folklore. Its roots are in oral traditions, which then became literature and drama. From the twentieth century it has expanded further into various media, including film, television, graphic novels and video games.

Contents

The award was first presented in 1953, the first year any Hugo Award was given, and with the exception of 1954 was given annually through 1972 when it was retired in favor of the newly created professional editor category. For the 1957 awards, the category was split into American and British magazine categories, a distinction which was not repeated any other year. In addition to the regular Hugo awards, beginning in 1996 Retrospective Hugo Awards, or "Retro Hugos", have been available to be awarded for years 50, 75, or 100 years prior in which no awards were given. [5] To date, Retro Hugo awards have been awarded for 1946, 1951, and 1954, but only for the professional editor category, not the professional magazine category that would have existed at the time. [6]

Hugo Award for Best Professional Editor

The Hugo Awards are given every year by the World Science Fiction Society for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The award is named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and was once officially known as the Science Fiction Achievement Award. The award has been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing". The Hugo Award for Best Professional Editor is given each year for editors of magazines, novels, anthologies, or other works related to science fiction or fantasy. The award supplanted a previous award for professional magazine.

Hugo Award nominees and winners are chosen by supporting or attending members of the annual World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon) and the presentation evening constitutes its central event. The selection process is defined in the World Science Fiction Society Constitution as instant-runoff voting with five nominees, except in the case of a tie. These five works on the ballot are the five most-nominated by members that year, with no limit on the number of works that can be nominated. The 1953 through 1956 and 1958 awards did not include any recognition of runner-up magazines, but since 1959 all five candidates were recorded. [5] Initial nominations are made by members in January through March, while voting on the ballot of five nominations is performed roughly in April through July, subject to change depending on when that year's Worldcon is held. [7] Worldcons are generally held near the start of September, and are held in a different city around the world each year. [1] [8]

Worldcon, or more formally the World Science Fiction Convention, the annual convention of the World Science Fiction Society (WSFS), is a science fiction convention. It has been held each year since 1939. The members of each Worldcon are the members of WSFS, and vote both to select the site of the Worldcon two years later, and to select the winners of the annual Hugo Awards, which are presented at each convention.

Instant-runoff voting (IRV) is a type of ranked preferential voting method used in single-seat elections with more than two candidates. Instead of indicating support for only one candidate, voters in IRV elections can rank the candidates in order of preference. Ballots are initially counted for each voter's top choice. If a candidate has more than half of the vote based on first-choices, that candidate wins. If not, then the candidate with the fewest votes is eliminated. The voters who selected the defeated candidate as a first choice then have their votes added to the totals of their next choice. This process continues until a candidate has more than half of the votes. When the field is reduced to two, it has become an "instant runoff" that allows a comparison of the top two candidates head-to-head.

During the nineteen nomination years, twelve magazines run by fifteen editors were nominated. Of these, only five magazines run by eight editors won. Astounding Science-Fiction /Analog Science Fact & Fiction and The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction each won eight times, out of eighteen and fifteen nominations, respectively. If won three of five nominations, New Worlds won one of its six nominations—though its win was in the 1957 "British Professional Magazine" category—and Galaxy Science Fiction won only one out of its fifteen nominations, for the first award in 1953. Of the magazines which never won, Amazing Stories was nominated the most at eight times, while the only other magazine to be nominated more than twice was Science Fantasy with three nominations. John W. Campbell, Jr. received both the most nominations and awards, as he edited Analog Science Fact & Fiction for all eighteen nominations and eight wins. Edward L. Ferman and Robert P. Mills both won four times, while Frederik Pohl won three. H. L. Gold received the second most number of nominations at twelve, while Cele Goldsmith received the most number of nominations without winning at ten for her work on two separate magazines; she was the only female editor to be nominated.

<i>Analog Science Fiction and Fact</i> US science fiction magazine

Analog Science Fiction and Fact is an American science fiction magazine published under various titles since 1930. Originally titled Astounding Stories of Super-Science, the first issue was dated January 1930, published by William Clayton, and edited by Harry Bates. Clayton went bankrupt in 1933 and the magazine was sold to Street & Smith. The new editor was F. Orlin Tremaine, who soon made Astounding the leading magazine in the nascent pulp science fiction field, publishing well-regarded stories such as Jack Williamson's Legion of Space and John W. Campbell's "Twilight". At the end of 1937, Campbell took over editorial duties under Tremaine's supervision, and the following year Tremaine was let go, giving Campbell more independence. Over the next few years Campbell published many stories that became classics in the field, including Isaac Asimov's Foundation series, A.E. van Vogt's Slan, and several novels and stories by Robert A. Heinlein. The period beginning with Campbell's editorship is often referred to as the Golden Age of Science Fiction.

<i>The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction</i> digest magazine

The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction is a U.S. fantasy and science fiction magazine first published in 1949 by Fantasy House, a subsidiary of Lawrence Spivak's Mercury Press. Editors Anthony Boucher and J. Francis McComas had approached Spivak in the mid-1940s about creating a fantasy companion to Spivak's existing mystery title, Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine. The first issue was titled The Magazine of Fantasy, but the decision was quickly made to include science fiction as well as fantasy, and the title was changed correspondingly with the second issue. F&SF was quite different in presentation from the existing science fiction magazines of the day, most of which were in pulp format: it had no interior illustrations, no letter column, and text in a single column format, which in the opinion of science fiction historian Mike Ashley "set F&SF apart, giving it the air and authority of a superior magazine".

<i>If</i> (magazine) magazine

If was an American science fiction magazine launched in March 1952 by Quinn Publications, owned by James L. Quinn.

Winners and nominees

In the following table, the years correspond to the date of the ceremony, rather than when the work was first published. Each date links to the "year in literature" article corresponding with when the work was eligible. Entries with a blue background and an asterisk (*) next to the work's name have won the award; those with a white background are the nominees on the short-list. For 1957, when the awards were split into a "Best Professional American Magazine" and "Best Professional British Magazine", the year column is marked as to which category the works were entered in. Note that Astounding Science-Fiction and Analog Science Fact & Fiction are the same magazine; no other nominated magazine underwent a name change during the period the award was active. [9]

  *   Winners and joint winners

YearWorkEditor(s)Ref.
1953 Astounding Science-Fiction * Campbell, Jr., John W. John W. Campbell, Jr. [10]
Galaxy Science Fiction * Gold, H. L. H. L. Gold [10]
1955 Astounding Science-Fiction * Campbell, Jr., John W. John W. Campbell, Jr. [11]
1956 Astounding Science-Fiction * Campbell, Jr., John W. John W. Campbell, Jr. [12]
1957
(American)
Astounding Science-Fiction * Campbell, Jr., John W. John W. Campbell, Jr. [13]
Boucher, Anthony Anthony Boucher [13]
Galaxy Science Fiction Gold, H. L. H. L. Gold [13]
Infinity Science Fiction Shaw, Larry T. Larry T. Shaw [13]
1957
(British)
New Worlds * Moorcock, Michael Michael Moorcock [13]
Nebula Science Fiction Hamilton, Peter F. Peter F. Hamilton [13]
1958 Boucher, Anthony Anthony Boucher and Robert P. Mills [14]
1959 Boucher, Anthony Anthony Boucher and Robert P. Mills [15]
Astounding Science-Fiction Campbell, Jr., John W. John W. Campbell, Jr. [15]
Galaxy Science Fiction Gold, H. L. H. L. Gold [15]
Infinity Science Fiction Shaw, Larry T. Larry T. Shaw [15]
New Worlds Moorcock, Michael Michael Moorcock [15]
1960 Mills, Robert P. Robert P. Mills [16]
Amazing Stories Goldsmith, Cele Cele Goldsmith [16]
Astounding Science-Fiction Campbell, Jr., John W. John W. Campbell, Jr. [16]
Galaxy Science Fiction Gold, H. L. H. L. Gold [16]
Fantastic Universe Santesson, Hans Stefan Hans Stefan Santesson [16]
1961 Analog Science Fact & Fiction * Campbell, Jr., John W. John W. Campbell, Jr. [17]
Amazing Stories Goldsmith, Cele Cele Goldsmith [17]
Mills, Robert P. Robert P. Mills [17]
1962 Analog Science Fact & Fiction * Campbell, Jr., John W. John W. Campbell, Jr. [18]
Amazing Stories Goldsmith, Cele Cele Goldsmith [18]
Mills, Robert P. Robert P. Mills and Avram Davidson [18]
Galaxy Science Fiction Gold, H. L. H. L. Gold [18]
Science Fantasy Carnell, John John Carnell [18]
1963 Mills, Robert P. Robert P. Mills and Avram Davidson [19]
Analog Science Fact & Fiction Campbell, Jr., John W. John W. Campbell, Jr. [19]
Fantastic Goldsmith, Cele Cele Goldsmith [19]
Galaxy Science Fiction Gold, H. L. H. L. Gold [19]
Science Fantasy Carnell, John John Carnell [19]
1964 Analog Science Fact & Fiction * Campbell, Jr., John W. John W. Campbell, Jr. [20]
Amazing Stories Goldsmith, Cele Cele Goldsmith [20]
Mills, Robert P. Robert P. Mills and Avram Davidson [20]
Galaxy Science Fiction Gold, H. L. H. L. Gold [20]
Science Fantasy Carnell, John John Carnell [20]
1965 Analog Science Fact & Fiction * Campbell, Jr., John W. John W. Campbell, Jr. [21]
Mills, Robert P. Robert P. Mills and Avram Davidson [21]
Galaxy Science Fiction Pohl, Frederik Frederik Pohl [21]
If Pohl, Frederik Frederik Pohl [21]
1966 If * Pohl, Frederik Frederik Pohl [22]
Amazing Stories Goldsmith, Cele Cele Goldsmith [22]
Analog Science Fact & Fiction Campbell, Jr., John W. John W. Campbell, Jr. [22]
Mills, Robert P. Robert P. Mills and Avram Davidson [22]
Galaxy Science Fiction Gold, H. L. H. L. Gold [22]
1967 If * Pohl, Frederik Frederik Pohl [23]
Analog Science Fact & Fiction Campbell, Jr., John W. John W. Campbell, Jr. [23]
Galaxy Science Fiction Gold, H. L. H. L. Gold [23]
New Worlds Moorcock, Michael Michael Moorcock [23]
1968 If * Pohl, Frederik Frederik Pohl [24]
Analog Science Fact & Fiction Campbell, Jr., John W. John W. Campbell, Jr. [24]
Ferman, Edward L. Edward L. Ferman [24]
Galaxy Science Fiction Gold, H. L. H. L. Gold [24]
New Worlds Moorcock, Michael Michael Moorcock [24]
1969 Ferman, Edward L. Edward L. Ferman [25]
Analog Science Fact & Fiction Campbell, Jr., John W. John W. Campbell, Jr. [25]
Galaxy Science Fiction Gold, H. L. H. L. Gold [25]
If Pohl, Frederik Frederik Pohl [25]
New Worlds Moorcock, Michael Michael Moorcock [25]
1970 Ferman, Edward L. Edward L. Ferman [26]
Amazing Stories Goldsmith, Cele Cele Goldsmith [26]
Analog Science Fact & Fiction Campbell, Jr., John W. John W. Campbell, Jr. [26]
Galaxy Science Fiction Jakobsson, Ejler Ejler Jakobsson [26]
New Worlds Moorcock, Michael Michael Moorcock [26]
1971 Ferman, Edward L. Edward L. Ferman [27]
Amazing Stories Goldsmith, Cele Cele Goldsmith [27]
Analog Science Fact & Fiction Campbell, Jr., John W. John W. Campbell, Jr. [27]
Galaxy Science Fiction Jakobsson, Ejler Ejler Jakobsson [27]
Visions of TomorrowGraham, RonRon Graham [27]
1972 Ferman, Edward L. Edward L. Ferman [28]
Amazing Stories Goldsmith, Cele Cele Goldsmith [28]
Analog Science Fact & Fiction Campbell, Jr., John W. John W. Campbell, Jr. [28]
Fantastic Goldsmith, Cele Cele Goldsmith [28]
Galaxy Science Fiction Jakobsson, Ejler Ejler Jakobsson [28]

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Hugo Award for Best Fan Artist

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Hugo Award for Best Fancast

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The Hugo Awards are given every year by the World Science Fiction Society for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The award is named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and was once officially known as the Science Fiction Achievement Award. It has been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing". The Hugo Award for Best Series is given each year for series of science fiction or fantasy stories published consisting of at least 3 works totaling at least 240,000 words, with at least one work released or translated into English during the previous calendar year. The Hugo Award for Best Series has been awarded annually since 2017. It was started then as a one-time special Hugo Award in advance of a vote to make it a permanent category, and was ratified as such by members of the World Science Fiction Society that year.

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