Hunslet R.L.F.C.

Last updated

Hunslet R.L.F.C.
Hunslet RLFC logo.png
Club information
Full nameHunslet Rugby League Football Club
Nickname(s)Parksiders
Colours Hunsletcolours.svg
Founded1973;48 years ago (1973)
Website hunsletrlfc.com
Current details
Ground(s)
Coach Alan Kilshaw
Competition League 1
2019 season 5th
Rugby football current event.png Current season
Uniforms
Kit left arm orange border.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body hunslet20h.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm orange border.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks orangetop.png
Kit socks long.svg
Home colours

Hunslet R.L.F.C. is a professional rugby league club in Hunslet, South Leeds, West Yorkshire, England, who play in Betfred League 1. The club was founded in 1973 as New Hunslet, they became Hunslet in 1979 and the club were the Hunslet Hawks between 1995 and 2016.

Contents

History

1973-1996: New club

In July 1973, the original Hunslet club was wound up because no suitable new location could be found that was financially viable. The £300,000 proceeds of the sale of Parkside were distributed to shareholders.

Due to the efforts of their former Great Britain forward Geoff Gunney (MBE), local businessmen and supporters the club managed to reform as New Hunslet for the 1973–74 season and moved to the Leeds Greyhound Stadium and erected iron American football posts. The resurrected club had a new badge depicting a rising phoenix to symbolise their rebirth. In 1974, New Hunslet adopted green and white as team colours because the traditional myrtle, white and flame colours were still registered to the former Parkside-based club, and they would not release them. The stay at the greyhound stadium was cut short when the owners closed the ground and arranged to demolish everything on the site.

In 1978, coach Bill Ramsey put a lot of pressure on the RFL and finally got permission to use the traditional colours. The club reverted to Hunslet for the 1979–80 season. With the closure of the Greyhound stadium, the next ground to host Hunslet was Mount Pleasant, Batley, for two seasons, before Hunslet moved to Leeds United's Elland Road football stadium then owned by Leeds City Council. After leaving Elland Road, Hunslet had a brief spell at Bramley.

On 19 November 1995, the club, now known as Hunslet Hawks, moved to the South Leeds Stadium, only about half a mile from Parkside. On that day, Leigh were the guests at Hunslet's first home game for twenty-two years. They then narrowly missed out on promotion from Division Two in 1996. [1] Coach Steve Ferres left to join Huddersfield and David Plange took over as player-coach.

1996-2009: Summer era

In 1997 the Hawks played in the first (and last) Challenge Cup Plate Final losing 60-14 to Hull Kingston Rovers. It was the Hawks first appearance at Wembley Stadium since 1965. Also in 1997, the Hawks were promoted to the First Division as champions. [1]

In 1999 as a possible merger between Hunslet and Bramley was debated. [2] In 1999 Hunslet won the Northern Ford Premiership Grand Final against Dewsbury, 12–11, at Headingley. [1] After that game the Hawks were denied entry to Super League by the Rugby Football League who cited a document called Framing the Future as justification. This caused a number of players to leave the club and for the average attendance to fall by more than 1,200 to 800. A link-up with Leeds Rhinos saw Plange go to Headingley as Academy coach.

2004 saw the re-establishment the annual friendly against Leeds Rhinos for the Lazenby Cup, a trophy that had previously been contested between Hunslet F.C. and Leeds since 1912. [3]

Paul March was the player/coach at Hunslet, joining midway through the 2009 season following the resignation of Graeme Hallas. March guided Hunslet to a 6th-place finish and a play-off spot in Championship 1. Hunslet travelled to Blackpool in the first week of the play-offs winning, 18–21, to set up an elimination semi-final against Oldham in which Hunslet were comfortably beaten, 54–30.

2010-present: Promotions and silverware

In 2010 Paul March led Hunslet to their first silverware for over 11 years by securing the Co-operative Championship 1 title, and subsequent survival in 2011.

In 2012, Barry Eaton took over as coach. In 2014 Hunslet won the Grand Final after extra time against Oldham, thus gaining promotion to the Championship. Barry Eaton left in late January 2016 to join Leeds Rhinos and was replaced by his assistant coach and former Hunslet Hawks player Matt Bramald. Bramald left the club at the end of the 2016 season having completed his contract. He was replaced by former Hunslet player James Coyle.

Hunslet Hawks returned to their original name of Hunslet RLFC for the 2017 season following an overwhelming fan vote in favour of their original name. Fans were then asked to choose between the clubs' original 'Rampant Lion' crest and the 'Phoenix Rising' crest adopted by the club in 1973 when the club was reformed. Fans voted 54% to 46% in favour of the lion.[ citation needed ]

Colours and crest

Old crest Hunslet hawks.png
Old crest

Hunslet play in myrtle, flame and white, with away colours mainly being white. The club's original crest was a 'Rampant Lion' but as part of a rebrand at the start of the summer era was the introduction of the Hunslet Hawks. In 2017, the club's fans voted to drop Hawks from their name and reinstate the 'Rampant Lion' crest.

Stadia

1883-1888 Woodhouse Hill

Hunslet played their first match on 6 October 1883 against Hull 'A'. A stand was built in 1884.

1888-1973: Parkside

Hunslet purchased at little cost of waste land at Hunslet Carr from the Low Moor Iron and Coal Company and had to shift 2,000 tons of rubbish to create what would become Parkside, which they moved to in 1888. Parkside's stand was burned down by vandals in 1971. Parkside was sold off to an industrial developer for around £300,000 in 1972. The last game at Parkside was on 21 April 1973 against York. Parkside was demolished and Hunslet became tenants at the Elland Road greyhound stadium.

1973-1980: Leeds Greyhound Stadium

The new Hunslet club's first ground was the Elland Road Greyhound Stadium in Beeston after they were told they could not play at Parkside. American football posts were erected to be used as goal posts.

1980-1982: Mount Pleasant

In 1982, the greyhound stadium closed and Hunslet were left homeless. For two seasons they ground-shared with Batley while they searched for a permanent home in Leeds.

1983-1995: Elland Road

In 1983, after leaving Batley, Hunslet negotiated a deal with Leeds City Council to play at Leeds United's Elland Road, which the council owned at the time.

1995-present: South Leeds Stadium

Grandstand at the South Leeds Stadium Southleedsstadium.jpg
Grandstand at the South Leeds Stadium

Hunslet moved into the South Leeds Stadium, Beeston, Leeds after it was built in 1995. The stadium is used to host athletics and also has a swimming pool and other facilities the club can use. The stadium has one main stand that accommodates the grounds 5,000 capacity.

2021 squad

* Announced on 13 April 2021:

Hunslet RLFC 2021 Squad
First team squadCoaching staff

Head coach

Assistant coaches


Legend:
  • (c) Captain(s)
  • (vc) Vice captain(s)

Updated: 13 April 2021
Source(s): 2021 Squad Numbers

2021 transfers

Gains

PlayerClubContractDate
Flag of England.svg Niall Walker London Broncos 1 YearOctober 2020
Flag of England.svg Will Cooke Keighley Cougars 1 YearOctober 2020
Flag of England.svg Brad Hey York City Knights 1 YearOctober 2020
Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg Jy-mel Coleman Unattached 1 YearNovember 2020
Flag of England.svg Lewis Wray Keighley Cougars 1 YearNovember 2020
Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg Aaron Jones-Bishop Oldham RLFC 1 YearDecember 2020
Flag of England.svg Joe McClean Unattached 1 YearApril 2021

Losses

PlayerClubContractDate
Flag of England.svg Josh Tonks Batley Bulldogs 2 YearsOctober 2020
Flag of England.svg Ben Heaton Oldham RLFC 1 YearOctober 2020
Flag of England.svg Zach Braham Keighley Cougars 1 YearOctober 2020
Flag of England.svg Danny Rowse Hunslet Club Parkside 1 YearMarch 2021
Flag of England.svg Jack Aldous Work Commitments N/AMarch 2021
Flag of England.svg Darren Forde ReleasedN/AFebruary 2021
Flag of England.svg Zach Johnson ReleasedN/AFebruary 2021
Flag of England.svg Ben Markland ReleasedN/AFebruary 2021
Flag of Scotland.svg Lochlan McGill ReleasedN/AFebruary 2021
Flag of England.svg Jack Ray ReleasedN/AFebruary 2021

Players

Players earning international caps while at Hunslet

Past coaches

Also see Category:Hunslet F.C. (1883) coaches & Category:Hunslet Hawks coaches.

Seasons

Super League era

SeasonLeague Play-offs Challenge Cup Other competitionsNameTriesNamePoints
DivisionPWDLFAPtsPosTop try scorerTop point scorer
1996 Division Two 221804730326363rdR4
1997 Division Two 201505682256301stR4
1998 Division One 3017112719575356thR4
1999 Northern Ford Premiership 282107845401422ndWon in FinalR4
2000 Northern Ford Premiership 2880204876781615thR4
2001 Northern Ford Premiership 2861213809591316thR4
2002 Northern Ford Premiership 273123438954717thR4
2003 National League Two 181017513425216thLost in Elimination PlayoffsR5
2004 National League Two 181008475394206thR4
2005 National League Two 181107476385225thLost in Elimination PlayoffsR4
2006 National League Two 2242164116171010thR4
2007 National League Two 228014368591318thR4
2008 National League Two 2240183367781712thR4
2009 Championship 1 181008472411336thLost in Semi FinalR4
2010 Championship 1 201802828305551stPromoted as ChampionsR5
2011 Championship 204115395630207thR4
2012 Championship 182016248684109thR4
2013 Championship 2660205297043013thR4
2014 Championship 1 191450666243462ndWon in FinalR5
2015 Championship 2350183627691011thR5
Championship Shield308022518957167th
2016 League 1 2111010544550227thR5
2017 League 1 157084183771410thWon in Shield FinalR4
2018 League 1 2615011735596307thR4
2019 League 1 201208596379245thLost in Elimination PlayoffsR4 1895 Cup R1
2020 League 1 League abandoned due to the COVID-19 pandemic in the United Kingdom R5
2021 League 1 0000000TBA

Honours

Winners (1): 1999
Winners (2): 2010, 2014
Winners: 2017

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References

General
Inline
  1. 1 2 3 "History". Hunslet RFLC. Retrieved 27 November 2016.
  2. "Sport: Rugby League: News Historic name disappears from league". BBC News. 6 October 1999. Retrieved 27 November 2016.
  3. "Hunslet v Leeds Rhinos: Traditional derby renamed in honour of stalwart Harry Jepson OBE". Yorkshire Evening Post. 18 November 2016. Retrieved 7 December 2017.
  4. "Kilshaw named as new coach at Hunslet RLFC". South Leeds Life. 20 July 2021. Retrieved 20 July 2021.