Isham baronets

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Sir Thomas Isham, 3rd Baronet
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Isham family coat of arms Isham arms.gif
Isham family coat of arms

The Isham Baronetcy, of Lamport in the County of Northampton, is a title in the Baronetage of England.

Contents

Isham baronets, of Lamport (1627)

History of the baronetcy

The Isham baronetcy was created on 30 May 1627 for John Isham, High Sheriff of Northamptonshire. [1] He was succeeded by his son Justinian, the second Baronet, who fought as a Royalist in the Civil War and sat as member of parliament for Northamptonshire after the Restoration. Justinian II, the fourth Baronet represented Northampton and Northamptonshire in the House of Commons while Justinian III and Edmund, the fifth and sixth Baronets, both represented Northamptonshire. Sir Gyles Isham, the twelfth Baronet, in 1958 was High Sheriff of Northamptonshire.

The family surname is pronounced "Eye-shum", and derives from the village of Isham, Northamptonshire. The family coat of arms are described as, "gules, a fesse wavy, and in chief three piles, also wavy, points meeting in fesse, argent". The family seat is Lamport Hall in Northamptonshire.

Succession

The heir apparent to the baronetcy is the 15th Baronet's eldest son, Angus David Vere Isham (born 1992). His heir presumptive is his younger brother, Charles Vere Ian Isham (born 1996).

See also

Notes

  1. Cokayne, George Edward, ed. (1902), Complete Baronetage volume 2 (1625-1649), vol. 2, Exeter: William Pollard and Co, retrieved 9 October 2018
  2. Bruce A. Bailey, "Isham, Sir Charles Edmund, tenth baronet (1819–1903)" in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004
  3. The Times: Births, marriages and deaths, November 16, 2021

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References