Lester Patrick Trophy

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Lester Patrick Trophy
Lester patrick trophy.jpg
Sport Ice hockey
Awarded forPersonnel who provide outstanding service to hockey in the United States.
History
First award 1966
Most recent Lynn Olson (2020)

The Lester Patrick Trophy has been presented by the National Hockey League and USA Hockey since 1966 to honor a recipient's contribution to ice hockey in the United States. It is considered a non-NHL trophy because it may be awarded to players, coaches, officials, and other personnel outside the NHL. The trophy is named after Lester Patrick (1883–1960), player and longtime coach of the New York Rangers, who was a developer of ice hockey.

History

The Lester Patrick Trophy was presented by the New York Rangers in 1966. [1] It honors the late Lester Patrick, who was a general manager and coach of the club. It is presented annually for "outstanding service to hockey in the United States". [2] Players, coaches, referees, and executives are eligible to receive the trophy, and are chosen by a committee including the National Hockey League (NHL) commissioner and a governor, a representative of the New York Rangers; and a previous inductee into the Hockey Hall of Fame's builder section, Hockey Hall of Fame player's section, U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame, NHL Broadcasters' Association, and the Professional Hockey Writers' Association. The trophy's first recipient was Jack Adams.

108 individuals, and three teams, have been given the trophy. The trophy has been given to women on two occasions; in 1999, the 1998 U.S. Olympic Women's Ice Hockey Team was presented the trophy along with Harry Sinden, and in 2007, Cammi Granato individually won the trophy. Granato was also a member of the 1998 U.S. Olympic Women's Ice Hockey Team that received the trophy in 1998. [3]

Recipients

- Trophy was awarded posthumously.

Clarence S. Campbell, winner in 1972. Clarence Campbell Stanley Cup 1957.jpg
Clarence S. Campbell, winner in 1972.
Terry Sawchuk, winner in 1971. Terry Sawchuk 1963.JPG
Terry Sawchuk, winner in 1971.
Wayne Gretzky, winner in 1994. Gretzky aug2001 closeup.jpg
Wayne Gretzky, winner in 1994.
Mario Lemieux, winner in 2000. Mario Lemieux 2001.jpg
Mario Lemieux, winner in 2000.
Scotty Bowman, winner in 2001. Scottybowman-2006awards.jpg
Scotty Bowman, winner in 2001.
Mike "Doc" Emrick, winner in 2004. Mike Emrick.jpg
Mike "Doc" Emrick, winner in 2004.
Brian Leetch, winner in 2007. Brian Leetch New York Rangers 1997.jpg
Brian Leetch, winner in 2007.
YearRecipientRole
1966 Jack Adams Coach
1967 Gordie Howe Player
1967 Charles Adams Executive
1967 James E. Norris Executive
1968 Tommy Lockhart Executive
1968 Walter A. Brown Executive
1968 John Kilpatrick Executive
1969 Bobby Hull Player
1969 Edward J. Jeremiah Coach
1970 Eddie Shore Player
1970 Jim Hendy Executive
1971 William M. Jennings Executive
1971 John B. Sollenberger Executive
1971 Terry Sawchuk Player
1972 Clarence S. Campbell Executive
1972 John Kelly Executive
1972 Ralph Weiland Player
1972 James D. Norris Executive
1973 Walter Bush Executive
1974 Alex Delvecchio Player
1974 Murray Murdoch Coach
1974 Weston Adams Executive
1974 Charles L. Crovat Executive
1975 Donald M. Clark Executive
1975 Bill Chadwick Official
1975 Tommy Ivan Coach
1976 Stan Mikita Player
1976 Al Leader Official
1976 Bruce Norris Executive
1977 Johnny Bucyk Player
1977 Murray Armstrong Player
1977 John Mariucci Multiple
1978 Phil Esposito Player
1978 Tom Fitzgerald Media
1978 William Thayer Tutt Executive
1978 Bill Wirtz Executive
1979 Bobby Orr Player
1980 Bobby Clarke Player
1980 Ed Snider Executive
1980 Fred Shero Coach
1980 1980 U.S. Olympic Men's Ice Hockey Team Multiple
1981 Charles M. Schulz Executive
1982 Emile Francis Multiple
1983 Bill Torrey Executive
1984 John Ziegler, Jr. Executive
1984 Art Ross Executive
1985 Jack Butterfield Executive
1985 Arthur M. Wirtz Executive
1986 John MacInnes Coach
1986 John P. Riley, Jr. Coach
1987 Hobey Baker Player
1987 Frank Mathers Coach
1988 Keith Allen Executive
1988 Fred Cusick Executive
1988 Bob Johnson Coach
1989 Dan Kelly Executive
1989 Lou Nanne Multiple
1989 Lynn Patrick Player
1989 Bud Poile Multiple
1990 Len Ceglarski Player
1991 Rod Gilbert Player
1991 Mike Ilitch Executive
1992 Al Arbour Coach
1992 Art Berglund Executive
1992 Lou Lamoriello Executive
1993 Frank Boucher Player
1993 Red Dutton Executive
1993 Bruce McNall Executive
1993 Gil Stein Executive
1994 Wayne Gretzky Player
1994 Robert Ridder Executive
1995 Joe Mullen Player
1995 Brian Mullen Player
1995 Bob Fleming Executive
1996 George Gund III Executive
1996 Ken Morrow Player
1996 Milt Schmidt Multiple
1997 Seymour H. Knox III Executive
1997 Bill Cleary Player
1997 Pat LaFontaine Player
1998 Peter Karmanos Jr. Executive
1998 Neal Broten Player
1998 John Mayasich Player
1998 Max McNab Multiple
1999 Harry Sinden Executive
1999 1998 U.S. Olympic Women's Ice Hockey Team Multiple
2000 Mario Lemieux Player
2000 Craig Patrick Executive
2000 Lou Vairo Coach
2001 Gary Bettman Executive
2001 Scotty Bowman Coach
2001 David Poile Executive
2002 Herb Brooks Coach
2002 Larry Pleau Multiple
2002 1960 U.S. Olympic Men's Ice Hockey Team Multiple
2003 Willie O'Ree Player
2003 Ray Bourque Player
2003 Ron DeGregorio Executive
2004 Doc Emrick Media
2004 John Davidson Media
2004 Ray Miron Executive
2005 2004–05 NHL lockout; no winner-
2006 Red Berenson Multiple
2006 Marcel Dionne Player
2006 Reed Larson Player
2006 Glen Sonmor Coach
2006 Steve Yzerman Player
2007 Brian Leetch Player
2007 Cammi Granato Player
2007 Stan Fischler Media
2007 John Halligan Executive
2008 Ted Lindsay Player
2008 Bob Naegele, Jr. Executive
2008 Brian Burke Executive
2008 Phil Housley Player
2009 Mark Messier Player
2009 Mike Richter Player
2009 Jim Devellano Executive
2010 Dave Andrews Executive
2010 Cam Neely Multiple
2010 Jack Parker Coach
2010 Jerry York Coach
2011 Mark Johnson Coach
2011 Jeff Sauer Coach
2011 Tony Rossi Executive
2011 Bob Pulford Multiple
2012 Bob Chase Media
2012 Dick Patrick Executive
2013 Kevin Allen Media
2014 Bill Daly Executive
2014 Paul Holmgren Multiple
2015 Jeremy Jacobs Executive
2015 Bob Crocker Multiple
2016 Mark Howe Player
2016 Patrick J. Kelly Executive
2017 Peter Lindberg Executive
2017 Dave Ogrean Executive
2018 Jim Johannson Executive
2019 Jack Blatherwick Multiple
2020 Lynn Olson Multiple

Notes and references

General
Specific
  1. Dinger, Ralph, ed. (2009). NHL Official Guide and Record Book 2010. NHL. p. 212.
  2. "Lester Patrick Trophy". NHL. Archived from the original on January 17, 2010. Retrieved February 3, 2008.
  3. "Notable Woman Hockey Players". Hockey Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on December 3, 2010. Retrieved February 3, 2008.

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