USA Hockey

Last updated

United States of America
USA Hockey.svg
Association nameUSA Hockey
FoundedOctober 29, 1937 (1937-10-29)
IIHF membershipMarch 22, 1947 (1947-03-22)
President Jim Smith
IIHF men's ranking6
IIHF women's ranking1
www.usahockey.com

USA Hockey is recognized by the International Olympic Committee and the United States Olympic & Paralympic Committee as the governing body for organized ice hockey in the United States and is a member of the International Ice Hockey Federation. [1] [2] [3] Before June 1991, the organization was known as the Amateur Hockey Association of the United States (AHAUS).

Contents

The organization is based in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Its mission is to promote the growth of ice hockey in the U.S. [2] USA Hockey programs support and develop players, coaches, officials, and facilities. USA Hockey also has junior ice hockey and senior ice hockey programs, and supports a disabled ice hockey program. USA Hockey provides certification programs for coaches and officials. [4] Members of the organization receive a subscription to USA Hockey Magazine. [5]

History

The Amateur Hockey Association of the United States (AHAUS) was founded on October 29, 1937, in New York City by Tommy Lockhart. [2] When he first started operating AHAUS, the paperwork fit into a shoebox in his apartment. [6] [7] [8] The need for a national governing body for hockey came from the desire to efficiently manage the growing game of ice hockey, rather than having several different groups which included the Amateur Athletic Union. [9]

In September 1938, Lockhart reached signed an agreement with W. G. Hardy of the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association (CAHA) which regulated international games in North America, set out provisions for transfer of players between the organizations, and recognized of each other's authority. [10] In 1940, he led AHAUS into a union with the CAHA by establishing the International Ice Hockey Association, and served as its vice-president. [11] AHAUS was admitted as a member of the Ligue Internationale de Hockey sur Glace in 1947, being recognized as the international governing body of hockey in the United States instead of the Amateur Athletic Union which was previously recognized by the IIHF. [12]

Lockhart established the first national ice hockey tournaments for pre-high school boys in 1949. [9] He announced the establishment of the United States Hockey Hall of Fame on May 19, 1968, to be located in the town of Eveleth, Minnesota. [13] Lockhart was succeeded as president by William Thayer Tutt in 1972. [14]

Presidents

Executive directors

Hall of fame

Structure

Playing levels

USA Hockey formerly used different division names (Mite, Squirt, etc.) in their youth levels and to indicate the age level of the players. [16] Prior to the 2016–17 season, they removed the traditional names in favor of simply referring to the age group. (18U, 16U, etc.) Many youth ice hockey organizations still use the traditional names when advertising their programs.

Youth levels:

Other classifications:

Districts

USA Hockey has divided its control into geographical youth districts as follows: Usahockeydistrictmap.png

National teams

National Team Development Program

USA NTDP
City Flag of Michigan.svg Plymouth, Michigan
League USHL
DivisionEast
Founded1996
Home arena USA Hockey Arena
ColorsRed, White, and Blue             
Franchise history
1996–PresentTeam USA

USA Hockey also operates the National Team Development Program, based in Plymouth, Michigan. The program's goal is to prepare student-athletes under the age of 18 for participation on U.S. national teams and continued success throughout their future hockey careers. [17] The NTDP consists of two teams; the U.S. National Under-18 Team, and the U.S. National Under-17 Team. [18] The teams compete in the United States Hockey League in addition to playing NCAA colleges and in International competition. Until 2009, the NTDP competed in the North American Hockey League. Numerous NTDP alumni have gone on to play in the NHL. In the 2012–13 season, 60 former NTDP players suited up for NHL teams. In the 2006 NHL Entry Draft, six first-round selections (including no. 1 pick Erik Johnson) were former members of the NTDP. In 2007, four NTDP members were selected in the first round, with Patrick Kane and James van Riemsdyk going 1st and 2nd overall respectively. Through 2013, some 228 NTDP players had been selected in the NHL Entry Draft. The NTDP plays home games at USA Hockey Arena.

Notable alumni:

International participation by year

2017
EventDivisionHost nationDateResult
Men Top Flag of Germany.svg  Germany / Flag of France.svg  France May 5–21, 2017Lost quarterfinals
(5th overall)
Men U20 Top Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada December 26, 2016 – January 5, 2017Champion
(1st overall)
Men U18 Top Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia April 13–23, 2017Champion
(1st overall)
Women Top Flag of the United States.svgUnited StatesMarch 31–April 7, 2017Champion
(1st overall)
Women U18 Top Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic January 7–14, 2017Champion
(1st overall)
Inline Top Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia June 24–July 2, 2017Champion
(1st overall)
2018
EventDivisionHost nationDateResult
Men Top Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark May 4–20, 2018Bronze medal
(3rd overall)
Men U20 Top Flag of the United States.svgUnited StatesDecember 26, 2017 – January 5, 2018Bronze medal
(3rd overall)
Men U18 Top Flag of Russia.svg  Russia April 19–29, 2018Runner-up
(2nd overall)
Women U18 Top Flag of Russia.svg  Russia January 6–13, 2018Champion
(1st overall)
Winter Olympics and Paralympics
Men Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea February 14–25, 20187th place
Women February 10–22, 2018Gold medal
Sled hockey March 10–18, 2018Gold medal
2019
EventDivisionHost nationDateResult
Men Top Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia May 10–26, 2019Lost quarterfinals
(7th overall)
Men U20 Top Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada December 26, 2018 – January 5, 2019Runner-up
(2nd overall)
Men U18 Top Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden April 18–28, 2019Bronze medal
(3rd overall)
Women Top Flag of Finland.svg  Finland April 4–14, 2019Champion
(1st overall)
Women U18 Top Flag of Japan.svg  Japan January 6–13, 2019Runner-up
(2nd overall)
2020
EventDivisionHost nationDateResult
Men Top Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland May 8–24, 2020
Cancelled
-
Men U20 Top Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic December 26, 2019 – January 5, 2020Lost quarterfinals
(6th overall)
Men U18 Top Flag of the United States.svgUnited StatesApril 16–26, 2020
Cancelled
-
Women Top Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada March 31–April 10, 2020
Cancelled
-
Women U18 Top Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia December 26, 2019 – January 2, 2020Champion
(1st overall)

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