List of English statutes

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This is a list of medieval statutes and other laws issued under royal authority in the Kingdom of England before the development of Parliament. These instruments are not considered to be Acts of Parliament, which can be found instead at the List of Acts of the Parliament of England.

11th century

12th century

13th century

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References

  1. Laws of William the Conqueror
  2. "The Charter of the Liberties of Henry I". Archived from the original on 2008-03-30. Retrieved 2006-12-14.
  3. Constitutions of Clarendon, 1164
  4. The Assize of the Forest 1184
  5. Ordinance of the Saladin Tithe (1188)
  6. Henry III: Charter of the Forest (1217)

See also