New Orleans Police Department

Last updated
New Orleans Police Department
New Orleans, LA Police.jpg
NOPD badge.png
AbbreviationNOPD
Agency overview
Formed1796
Jurisdictional structure
Operations jurisdictionNew Orleans, Louisiana, United States
Map of Louisiana and USA highlighting Orleans Parish.png
Map of New Orleans Police Department's jurisdiction.
Size350.2 square miles (907 km2)
Population365,000 (est.)
General nature
Headquarters715 S. Broad Street, New Orleans, Louisiana 70119

Officers1,106 (2015)
Agency executive
Bureaus5
Facilities
Districts8
Central Lockups1
Website
NOPD site

The New Orleans Police Department (NOPD) has primary responsibility for law enforcement in New Orleans, Louisiana. The department's jurisdiction covers all of Orleans Parish, while the city is divided into eight police districts. Shaun D. Ferguson is the Superintendent of Police since January 18th, 2019.

New Orleans Largest city in Louisiana

New Orleans is a consolidated city-parish located along the Mississippi River in the southeastern region of the U.S. state of Louisiana. With an estimated population of 393,292 in 2017, it is the most populous city in Louisiana. A major port, New Orleans is considered an economic and commercial hub for the broader Gulf Coast region of the United States.

Louisiana State of the United States of America

Louisiana is a state in the Deep South region of the South Central United States. It is the 31st most extensive and the 25th most populous of the 50 United States. Louisiana is bordered by the state of Texas to the west, Arkansas to the north, Mississippi to the east, and the Gulf of Mexico to the south. A large part of its eastern boundary is demarcated by the Mississippi River. Louisiana is the only U.S. state with political subdivisions termed parishes, which are equivalent to counties. The state's capital is Baton Rouge, and its largest city is New Orleans.

Contents

Districts

The NOPD is divided into eight police districts, each of which is commanded by a Police Commander:

Tremé New Orleans Neighborhood in Louisiana, United States

Tremé is a neighborhood of the city of New Orleans, in the U.S. state of Louisiana. "Tremé" is often rendered as Treme, historically the neighborhood is sometimes called by its more formal French names of Faubourg Tremé; it is listed in the New Orleans City Planning Districts as Tremé / Lafitte when including the Lafitte Projects. Originally known as "Back of Town", urban planners renamed the neighborhood "Faubourg Tremé" in an effort to revitalize the historic area. A subdistrict of the Mid-City District Area, its boundaries as defined by the City Planning Commission are Esplanade Avenue to the east, North Rampart Street to the south, St. Louis Street to the west and North Broad Street to the north. It is one of the oldest neighborhoods in the city, and early in the city's history was the main neighborhood of free people of color. Historically a racially mixed neighborhood, it remains an important center of the city's African-American and Créole culture, especially the modern brass band tradition.

Mid-City New Orleans New Orleans neighborhood in Louisiana, United States

Mid-City is a neighborhood of the city of New Orleans. A sub-district of the Mid-City District Area, its boundaries as defined by the City Planning Commission are: City Park Avenue, Toulouse Street, North Carrollton, Orleans Avenue, Bayou St. John and St. Louis Street to the north, North Broad Street to the east, and the Pontchartrain Expressway to the west. It is a historic district on the National Register of Historic Places. In common usage, a somewhat larger area surrounding these borders is often also referred to as part of Mid-City.

Uptown New Orleans human settlement in United States of America

Uptown is a section of New Orleans, Louisiana, United States, on the east bank of the Mississippi River, encompassing a number of neighborhoods between the French Quarter and the Jefferson Parish line. It remains an area of mixed residential and small commercial properties, with a wealth of 19th-century architecture. It includes part or all of Uptown New Orleans Historic District, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

There are several units within each district, including Uniform Patrol, District Investigative Unit-Property Crimes, District Investigative Unit-Person Crimes, Task Force and Quality of Life Unit.

History

African American New Orleans Police officer, 1871, sketched by Alfred Waud NegroPolicemanNewOrleans1871Waud.jpg
African American New Orleans Police officer, 1871, sketched by Alfred Waud
Battle of Liberty Place-charge on the Police and Militia Battle of Liberty Place Leslies Illustrated Newspaper.jpg
Battle of Liberty Place-charge on the Police and Militia

After New Orleans was founded by French colonists in 1718, the policing of the city was done by military forces. These were alternating French, Spanish and French under differing governmental rule. The formation of the New Orleans Police Department was first recorded in 1796, during the administration of Baron Francisco Luis Héctor de Carondelet. The account said, "Crime had reached such proportions by the mid-1790s that a full-time city police force was required." [1] In the early 1800s, the council authorized the hiring of free people of color, who were to be commanded by white officers. During French and Spanish years, a relatively large class of free people of color had developed in New Orleans, many of whom had become educated and property owners. Of mixed race, they had become established as a distinct class in the society, between the ethnic European residents and the mass of mostly African slaves in the region.

Free people of color persons of partial African and European descent who were not enslaved

In the context of the history of slavery in the Americas, free people of color were people of mixed African and European descent who were not enslaved. The term arose in the French colonies, including La Louisiane and settlements on Caribbean islands, such as Saint-Domingue (Haiti), Guadeloupe, and Martinique, where a distinct group of free people of color developed. Freed African slaves were included in the term affranchis, but historically they were considered as distinct from the free people of color. In these territories and major cities, particularly New Orleans, and those cities held by the Spanish, a substantial third class of primarily mixed-race, free people developed. These colonial societies classified mixed-race people in a variety of ways, generally related to visible features and to the proportion of African ancestry. Racial classifications were numerous in Latin America.

On November 8, 1803, Mayor Etienne de Boré holds the first council meeting, and appoints a committee to inspect prisons and formulate police rules. He also appoints Pierre Achille Rivery Commissioner General of Police, with 25 agents at his head. They are quickly forced to resign as a result of numerous complaints, and the city authorized to engage mulattoes, which are placed under the authority of white officers, became a part of the United States on December 20,1803 by virtue of the Louisiana Purchase. In 1804 a patrol militia was organized under James Pitot, the Mayor of New Orleans, two years later the body dissolved. [2] With urbanization, in 1817, the city had 46 commissioners, it was divided into four police districts (Old Square, Faubourg Tremé (in), St. Mary and Faubourg Marigny). Given the inefficiency of this one, committees of "vigilantes" are created in the years 1820-1830. In 1836, the city was divided into three separate municipalities, each with an autonomous police force..

Louisiana Purchase Acquisition by the United States of America of Frances claim to the territory of Louisiana

The Louisiana Purchase was the acquisition of the Louisiana territory of New France by the United States from France in 1803. The U.S. paid fifty million francs ($11,250,000) and a cancellation of debts worth eighteen million francs ($3,750,000) for a total of sixty-eight million francs. The Louisiana territory included land from fifteen present U.S. states and two Canadian provinces. The territory contained land that forms Arkansas, Missouri, Iowa, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska; the portion of Minnesota west of the Mississippi River; a large portion of North Dakota; a large portion of South Dakota; the northeastern section of New Mexico; the northern portion of Texas; the area of Montana, Wyoming, and Colorado east of the Continental Divide; Louisiana west of the Mississippi River ; and small portions of land within the present Canadian provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan. Its non-native population was around 60,000 inhabitants, of whom half were African slaves.

In July 1866 Republicans called for a Louisiana Constitutional Convention at the Mechanics Institute in New Orleans, as they were angered by the legislature's passage of Black Codes and failure to provide suffrage for free men of color and freedmen. Blacks marched in support of the convention, and were attacked on the street by a white mob, made up of ex-Confederate veterans. This was later called the New Orleans Riot of 1866. The mob killed 34 black citizens and three white Republicans; estimates of wounded ranged from 48 to more than 100, mostly black. [3] The riot "stemmed from deeply rooted political, social, and economic causes," and took place in part because of the battle "between two opposing factions for power and office." [4] The governor called in federal troops to restore order. The riots in New Orleans and Memphis that year contributed to Congressional passage of Reconstruction legislation and domination of the state by military forces for several years.

Black Codes (United States)

The Black Codes were laws passed by Southern states in 1865 and 1866 in the United States after the American Civil War with the intent and the effect of restricting African Americans' freedom, and of compelling them to work in a labor economy based on low wages or debt. Black Codes were part of a larger pattern of Southern whites, who were trying to suppress the new freedom of emancipated African-American slaves, the freedmen. Black codes were essentially replacements for slave codes in those states. Before the war in states that prohibited slavery, some Black Codes were also enacted. Northern states such as Ohio, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, and New York enacted Black Codes to discourage free blacks from residing in those states and denying them equal rights, including the right to vote, the right to public education, and the right to equal treatment under the law. Some of these northern black codes were repealed around the same time that the Civil War ended and slavery was abolished.

Violence continued in the state and city related to each election, particularly before and after the disputed gubernatorial election of 1872. Tensions continued, although the federal government had certified the Republican slate and William Kellogg as governor. In September 1874, in the so-called Battle of Liberty Place, 5,000 members of the White League entered the city in an attempted takeover of state buildings to seat John McEnery, the Democratic candidate for governor. Well-armed, they overwhelmed the 3500 members of the integrated Metropolitan police force, blacks and Republicans, and occupied the state armory and other buildings for three days. Learning that federal troops were arriving by ship, the White League forces retreated from the city. The Louisiana State Museum reports that 11 Metropolitans were killed and 60 wounded, while 16 White Leaguers were killed and 45 wounded. [5]
The October 1890 murder of Police Chief Hennessey resulted in the lynching of eleven suspects [6] Between July 24 and July 28, 1900, a violent suspect resisted arrest and killed four police officers and mortally wounded one. [7]

William Pitt Kellogg United States Senator and Governor of Louisiana

William Pitt Kellogg was an American lawyer and Republican Party politician who served as a United States Senator from 1868 to 1872 and from 1877 to 1883 and as the Governor of Louisiana from 1873 to 1877 during the Reconstruction Era.

Battle of Liberty Place

The Battle of Liberty Place, or Battle of Canal Street, was an attempted insurrection by the Crescent City White League against the Reconstruction Era Louisiana state government on September 14, 1874, in New Orleans, which was the capital of Louisiana at the time. Five thousand members of the White League, a paramilitary organization of the Democratic Party, made up largely of Confederate veterans, fought against the outnumbered New Orleans Metropolitan Police and state militia. The insurgents held the statehouse, armory, and downtown for three days, retreating before arrival of Federal troops that restored the elected government. No insurgents were charged in the action. This was the last major event of violence stemming from the disputed 1872 gubernatorial election, after which Democrat John McEnery and Republican William Pitt Kellogg both claimed victory.

White League white paramilitary group from the United States

The White League, also known as the White Man's League, was a white paramilitary organization started in the Southern United States in 1874 to kick Republicans out of office and intimidate freedmen from voting and politically organizing. The group was affiliated with the Democratic Party. Its first chapter was formed in Grant Parish, Louisiana and neighboring parishes and was made up of many of the Confederate veterans who had participated in the Colfax massacre in April 1873. Chapters were soon founded in New Orleans and other areas of the state.

Mounted police during New Orleans Mardi Gras 1984 New Orleans Mardi Gras 1984 Mounted Police on St. Charles.jpg
Mounted police during New Orleans Mardi Gras 1984

Early 21st century

Ronal Serpas, 2010 Ronal Serpas.jpg
Ronal Serpas, 2010

In 2014, Superintendent Serpas retired from the New Orleans Police Department after 21 years of service. Before retiring, Superintendent Serpas attained the civil service rank of major and the appointed position of assistant superintendent of the NOPD. Chief Serpas was preceded by Warren J. Riley, who retired with the change of the mayoral administration on May 2, 2010. Riley had been preceded by Eddie Compass and Richard Pennington.

During a press conference on Friday, June 25, 2010, Superintendent Serpas announced several reforms to the New Orleans Police Department. Superintendent Serpas reduced the number of deputy superintendents from six to four, and decided that only two of those positions would be held by commissioned officers. Serpas announced that Marlon Defillo, current Assistant Superintendent of the Bureau of Investigations, would take on a new role as the Deputy Chief of the Operations Bureau. Current Deputy Chief Kirk Bouyelas would also take on a new role as Deputy Chief of the Investigative Services Bureau. The two civilian deputy chiefs were to be Ms. Arlinda Westbrook, Deputy Chief (Civilian) in charge of the Public Integrity Bureau, and Ms. Stephanie Landry, Deputy Chief (Civilian) in charge of the Management Services Bureau. Serpas also reduced the rank of eleven appointed Majors to their proper civil service rank of Captain. Also in the slew of changes, Serpas reassigned 25 of the current 37 Captains within the department. Superintendent Serpas announced on June 23, 2010, that the majority of his highest-ranking commissioned officers – for example, majors and deputy chiefs – would be summarily demoted effective June 27 to captain, the latter rank thereby returning as the de facto rank of district station commander. [8] As a courtesy, many personnel continue to address district commanders with the honorific "Major." As of July 2010, only two officers – Treadaway and Burkart – retain the rank of major, both of whom were appointed to the position by civil service.

Also in accordance with the above changes, two of Serpas's deputy chiefs swapped responsibilities, while two others were replaced by civilian personnel, bringing the net count of deputy chiefs from six to four. [9]

On Tuesday, March 1, 2011, the New Orleans Civil Service Commission unanimously approved Superintendent Serpas' proposal to create a new pay plan for 16 new "Police Commanders". Serpas originally asked the Commission to approve 16 "Colonel's" positions. The new "Commanders" will be third in the command structure of the New Orleans Police Department, only ranked lower than the Superintendent and Deputy Superintendents. In June 2011, 1 additional commander position was created for the Reserve Division. All other personnel, including the two Majors will be subordinate to these individuals. [10] The Police Commanders are responsible for the 17 "Core Components" of the NOPD, including the 8 Patrol Districts and 9 other units as noted below.

On Monday, August 18, 2014, at a press conference at City Hall, Superintendent Ronal W. Serpas announced his retirement from the New Orleans Police Department, effective immediately. Mayor Mitch Landrieu then announced the appointment of 7th District Commander Michael S. Harrison, a 23-year veteran as the Interim Superintendent of Police. It was announced later in the day that former Superintendent Serpas would be taking on a faculty teaching position at Loyola University of New Orleans.

On Friday, August 22, 2014, Interim Superintendent Harrison announced that veteran Deputy Superintendent of Operations Darryl Albert would now take command of the Investigative & Support Bureau, becoming the Chief of Detectives. It was also announced that 6th District Commander Robert Bardy had been promoted to Deputy Superintendent of Operations. Also promoted were Lieutenants Ronnie Stevens and Lawrence Dupree, now Commanders of the 6th & 7th Districts respectively.

On Friday, October 17, 2014, Superintendent Harrison announced the realignment of some of the department's top brass. Commander Rannie Mushatt was promoted to Deputy Superintendent of the Investigative & Support Bureau, the position formerly held by Darryl J. Albert. Chief Albert was reduced in rank to Police Commander and appointed command of the Criminal Investigation Division. Lieutenants Doug Eckert & Richard Williams were promoted to the Police Commander position and placed in command of the Education, Training & Recruitment Division and Crime Lab & Evidence Division reapectively. Commander John Thomas who holds a Juris Doctorate and previously commanded the Crime Lab & Evidence Division assumed new duties as the commander of the Compliance Bureau. Commander Kim Lewis-Williams was reduced in rank to her permanent civil service classification of police lieutenant and transferred back to patrol duties.[ citation needed ]

In mid-2015, press reports indicated that the department was able to clear less than a third of its homicide cases. [11]

Misconduct

Antoinette Frank (1995)

On 4 March 1995, Officer Antoinette Frank robbed a local restaurant, killed two of the owner's children, as well as her own partner who was working security at the business. She was sentenced to death. [12]

Murder of Kim Groves (1994)

Officer Len Davis was found guilty and was sentenced to death for ordering hit-man Paul Hardy to murder Kim Groves, a 32-year-old mother of three children. Groves had filed a police brutality complaint against Davis with Internal Affairs the previous day, and a fellow officer tipped Davis about the charge. [13] Hardy was sentenced to life in prison.

Hurricane Katrina (2005)

In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, ninety-one officers resigned or retired and another two hundred and twenty-eight were investigated for abandoning their posts. [14]

Danziger Bridge shootings

One report of violence involved a police shooting of six citizens on the Danziger Bridge, which carries the Chef Menteur Highway (US 90) across the Industrial Canal. These citizens were reportedly attacking contractors of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers involved in the 17th Street Canal repair. Other reports alleged people seeking refuge on the bridge from the flood were fired on without provocation. [15] The shootings left two dead and four injured. Subsequently, seven NOPD officers were indicted on murder charges in connection with the incident known as the "Danziger 7". The case was dropped when the prosecutor who brought the charges, Eddie Jordan, resigned his position following charges of corruption and a judgment against him in a racial discrimination lawsuit. On August 13, 2008, District Judge Raymond Bigelow dismissed the case based on misconduct by the prosecution. [16] On August 5, 2011, a New Orleans Federal Court jury convicted five police officers of a myriad of charges related to the cover-up and deprivation of civil rights. [17]

Jeff Winn

In late May, 2011, Captain Jeff Winn was fired and a number of other officers reassigned for concealing details concerning the killing of Henry Glover in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. [18]

Joshua Colclough (2012)

In August 2012, Officer Joshua Colclough pleaded guilty to manslaughter in his killing of an unarmed man during a drug raid. He was sentenced to four years in jail. [19]

The NOPD entered into a consent decree in 2012 with the U.S. Department of Justice. A U.S. DOJ investigation led to a 2011 written report alleging unconstitutional conduct by the NOPD and describing concerns re NOPD policies and procedures. [20]

Maurice Palmer (2013)

In April 2013, former Officer Maurice Palmer was sentenced to five years' probation for failing to file federal income tax forms. [21]

Quincy Jones and Rafael Dobard (2014)

In February 2014, Officers Quincy Jones and Rafael Dobard pleaded guilty to charges relating to faking time sheets and embezzling money from the department. [22]

Desmond Pratt (2014)

In March 2014, Detective Desmond Pratt pleaded guilty to sexual assault of three underaged girls. He was sentenced to three years in state custody. [23]

Rank structure

Title [24] CommandInsigniaShirtAddressSalary* (2016)Number (2018)
Superintendent of Police Police Department
4 Gold Stars.svg
White"Superintendent"
or "Chief"
Unclassified1
Deputy Superintendent Bureau
3 Gold Stars.svg
White"Chief"
or "Deputy Chief"
$123, 247
1
Deputy Superintendent Bureau
2 Gold Stars.svg
White"Chief"
or "Deputy Chief"
$123, 247
4
Commander District Station, Division
1 Gold Star.svg
White"Commander"79,98716
Major Division, Bureau
US-O4 insignia.svg
White"Major"$1
Captain Division,
Unit, Section
Captain insignia gold.svg
White"Captain"68,9097
(2%)
Lieutenant Platoon,
Division,
District Unit,
Section
US-OF1B.svg
Blue"Lieutenant"58,63371
(4%)
Sergeant Major

Honorary Rank

Sector,
Section,
Task Force
Blue"Sergeant Major"54,4211 [25] [26]
Sergeant Sector,
Section,
Task Force
NJSP Sergeant Stripes.png
Blue"Sergeant"54,421195

(15%)

Detective Investigations,
CrimeStoppers
Same
as Officers
Plainclothes "Detective"5.8%
Officer IV Patrol,
Various
Chevron double silver.jpg
Blue"Officer"49,27472%
Officer III (see above)
Chevron single+1rocker silver.jpg
Blue"Officer"46,885(see above)
Officer II (see above)
Chevron single silver.jpg
Blue"Officer"44,612(see above)
Officer I (see above)
Blank.jpg
Blue"Officer"42,449(see above)
Reserve (same as regular Officers)
Blank.jpg
Blue"Officer"Unpaid volunteer85
Recruit (Field) N/A
Blank.jpg
N/A"Recruit"40,391N/A
Recruit (Academy) N/A
Blank.jpg
N/A"Recruit"40,391N/A

NOTES: *The State of Louisiana provides $6,000 supplemental annual pay after one year of service. [27] Additional annual pay is merited for the following degrees: [28] Associates: $1,000 Bachelors: $2,000 Graduate: $3,000 (Masters, Doctorate)

Demographics

Breakdown of the makeup of the rank and file of NOPD: [29]

Hurricane Katrina

In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina on August 29, 2005, shooting, violence and other criminal activity became serious problems. With most of the attention of the authorities focused on rescue efforts, security in New Orleans degraded quickly. [30] By August 30, looting had spread throughout the city, often in broad daylight and in the presence of police officers. "The looting is out of control. The French Quarter has been attacked," City Councilwoman Jackie Clarkson said. [31]

Incapacitated by the breakdown of transportation and communication, as well as overwhelmed in terms of numbers, police officers could do little to stop crime. Shopkeepers who remained behind were left to defend their property alone. Looters included gangs of gunmen, and gunfire was heard in various parts of the city. Along with violent armed robbery of nonessential valuable goods, many incidents were of residents simply gathering food, water and other essential commodities from unstaffed grocery stores. There were also reports of looting by some police officers.

Over 200 NOPD officers were said to have deserted the city during the storm. [32] These officers were given the opportunity to explain their actions before the deputy chief in a tribunal-like hearing, after which 85% of the officers who supposedly deserted were terminated. The ones who stayed during Katrina were awarded with a Hurricane Katrina lapel pin to be worn on the uniform. It is shaped like the star and crescent badge, with a hurricane emblem in the center of the star.

New Orleans Police vehicle in 2009 New Orleans Police 2009.jpg
New Orleans Police vehicle in 2009

Prior to Katrina, the New Orleans Police Department was notable as being one of the few major departments in the country whose officers sported powder blue uniform shirts instead of the dark or navy blue shirts used by the majority of police forces nationwide. In the wake of Katrina, however, the department switched to a dark blue uniform shirt in order to avoid potential problems from people, including officers dismissed after the hurricane who may have attempted to illegally pass themselves off as police officers. Beginning on Friday, February 13, 2009, during the annual Mardi Gras celebration, NOPD officers permanently returned to wearing powder blue uniform shirts to the delight of many New Orleans residents who observed the groups of traditionally-clad officers along the parade routes.

In the fall of 2007, the Fox television network dramatized post-Katrina New Orleans in the short-lived police drama K-Ville starring Anthony Anderson and Cole Hauser as NOPD detectives working for the Felony Action Squad (FAS).

Bureaus and Command Staff

The NOPD is divided into five bureaus, each commanded by a deputy superintendent who reports to the superintendent of police:

In the absence of the superintendent, the Deputy Superintendent of Field Operations will command the department.

Non-District Core Components and Command Staff

Personnel shortage

As of July 2015, the New Orleans Police Department had 1,106 officers on the force. [33] Prior to Hurricane Katrina in 2005, the NOPD had 1,742 commissioned police officers. [34] The NOPD was actively recruiting to increase manpower in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, which preceded an unusually high number of resignations.

New Orleans Police Badge

The Star and Crescent badge, unique to the NOPD, has been worn by members of the department since 1855. The crescent represents the shape of the city, as the Mississippi River forms a crescent shape around the city.The star represents the power of a state or local government to preserve order and keep the peace; it is a traditional symbol of law enforcement authority in the United States.

Fallen Officers

Since the establishment of the New Orleans Police Department in 1796, there have been 117 Officers who died in the line of duty.

RankNameDate of DeathCause of DeathAgeLocation
Police OfficerAlexander Algeo03-26-1856Succumbed to injuries sustained on 03-17-1856 after being shot while patrolling a street cornerN/AAt the corner of Magazine Street and Common Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanJames Crofton10-04-1969Shot and killed while trying to arrest a man which beat his son40At 175 St. Andrews Street, New Orleans, Louisiana 70130
Police OfficerJohn Coffee04-22-1883Shot and killed while trying to arrest a man for robbery and assault57Intersection of Franklin Street and Customhouse Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
Chief of PoliceDavid C. Hennessy10-16-1890Killed by a mob to prevent him from testifying in an upcoming trial32N/A
PatrolmanJohn Hurley04-04-1892Shot and killed by a noted criminal, Frank Lyons, after breaking up a fightN/AOn Gallatin Street near Hospital Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
CorporalThomas Fitzgerald08-10-1892Shot and killed while trying to calm a disturbanceN/AAt St. Mary's Market in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanAlbert Turregano02-09-1893Shot and killed while responding to 6 men firing guns35Intersection of Aubrey Street and Tonti Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanJohn Pettaway10-10-1893Shot and killed by a notorious criminal while trying to arrest him for assaultN/AIntersection of Chippewa Street and Washington Avenue in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanJohn H. Keller11-18-1894Shot and killed by a man he was trying to arrest for public intoxicationN/AIn Exchange Alley near Canal Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanJohn Teen04-27-1896Shot and killed by a man he was trying to arrest for public intoxication and disturbing the peaceN/AIntersection of Willow Street and Cypress Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
CorporalAnthony Cleary05-06-1898Shot and killed while trying to arrest a man for robberyN/AIntersection of Perdido Street and South Rampart Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanMartin Trimp05-06-1898Shot and killed minutes after Corporal Anthony Cleary after cornering the same robbery suspectN/AIntersection of Bernadotte Street and Cleveland Avenue in New Orleans, Louisiana
CorporalRichard Fitzgerald06-10-1898Shot and killed while trying to arrest 3 men for disturbing the peace36At the corner of Alix Street and Bouny Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
CorporalThomas Duffy05-11-1899Died from injuries sustained in 1885 in a shootout with 3 robbersN/AOn Decatur Street near the French Market in New Orleans, Louisiana
CaptainJohn Day07-24-1900Shot and killed along with Patrolman Peter J. Lamb while trying to arrest a wanted criminalN/AAt the criminal's house on 4th Street, in between Rampart Street and Saratoga Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanPeter J. Lamb07-24-1900Shot and killed along with Captain John Day while trying to arrest a wanted criminal48At the criminal's house on 4th Street, in between Rampart Street and Saratoga Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
Jail KeeperAndrew van Kuren07-27-1900Shot and killed along with Sergeant Gabriel J. Porteous and Corporal John F. Lally while raiding the home of a wanted criminal that killed Captain John Day and Patrolman Peter J. Lamb on 07-24-190045At the 1200 block of Saratoga Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
CorporalJohn F. Lally07-29-1900Shot and killed along with Sergeant Gabriel J. Porteous and Jail Keeper Andrew van Kuren while raiding the home of a wanted criminal that killed Captain John Day and Patrolman Peter J. Lamb on 07-24-1900N/AAt the 1200 block of Saratoga Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
SergeantGabe J. Porteous07-28-1900Succumbed to injuries sustained from being shot on 07-27-1900 with Jail Keeper Andrew van Kuren and Corporal John F. Lally while raiding the home of a wanted criminal who killed Captain John Day and Patrolman Peter J. Lamb on 07-24-1900N/AAt the 1200 block of Saratoga Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanJohn Thomas03-10-1901Shot and killed in a dance hall while breaking up a fightN/AAt the corner of Elizardi Street and Burgundy Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanCharles Doyle02-07-1903Succumbed to injuries sustained from a gunshot wound in December of 1902 while trying to arrest a man for disturbing the peaceN/AIntersection of Melpomene Street and St. Charles Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanRobert J. Cambias10-18-1907Killed when his throat was slashed by a knife during a fight while trying to arrest a man for stabbing someone else22On Allen Street, near New Orleans Street and Prieur Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanJohn Carroll08-14-1908Stabbed in the stomach while breaking up a fight in a train carN/AAt the Louisville and Nashville Railroad depot
PatrolmanCharles Merritt02-14-1911Shot and killed by a drunk youth he was attempting to arrest50Intersection of Camp Street and Poyefarre Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanJoseph Lacoste11-01-1911Shot and killed along with Patrolman George A. Russell by an insane man after docking on a ferryN/AOn the Algiers Ferry at the Algiers landing in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanDennis Egan11-22-1914Succumbed to injuries sustained on 11-20-1914 after being shot while attempting to arrest a man for beating his wifeN/AOn Ursuline Avenue in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanFrancis A. Burke07-05-1915Drowned after slipping from a wharf dock ladder while trying to tell a group of boys to not swim32In the Mississippi River in between 7th Street and 8th Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
SuperintendentJames W. Reynolds08-02-1917Shot and killed along with Captain Garry Owen Mullen by a fellow Officer who had been suspended multiple timesN/AIn the Superintendent's office in the New Orleans Police Department Headquarters in New Orleans, Louisiana
CaptainGarry Owen Mullen08-02-1917Shot and killed along with Superintendent James W. Reynolds by a fellow Officer who had been suspended multiple times44In the Superintendent's office in the New Orleans Police Department Headquarters in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanWilliam J. Brown12-09-1917Shot and killed by a suspect's friend while trying to arrest him for creating a disturbance45At a restaurant on St. Mary Street near Magazine Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanFrank P. Connor02-14-1918Shot and killed on the same day and by the same guy as Detective Patrick J. KennedyN/AOn Eagle Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
DetectivePatrick J. Kennedy02-14-1918Shot and killed on the same day and by the same man as Patrolman Frank P. Connor44At the corner of Panola Street and Pine Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
DetectiveTheodore A. Obitz05-26-1918Shot and killed by a man he was questioning for being a possible highwayman38Near Calliope Street and Baronne Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
CorporalCharles A. Giblin06-15-1919Shot and killed while attempting to arrest a man for beating his wife62In a home near Erato Street and South Rampart Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
CorporalAlfred J. Beyl02-19-1920Succumbed to injuries sustained on 02-14-1920 after being shot by a man he attempted to arrest for shooting another man at a nightclub46Corner of Dauphine Street and St. Louis Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanRoselius Folse07-20-1920Shot and killed by a car thief he attempted to arrest51In front of the police station on St. Phillip Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanPat Manning05-27-1921Suffered a fatal heart attack while arresting a suspectN/AAt the corner of St. Peter's Street and Chartres Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanTimothy Lynch, Jr.02-11-1922Died from an unknown way of electrocutionN/AAt the corner of Dumaine Street and North Peters Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanGeorge E. Heno08-15-1922Killed in a motorcycle crashN/AIntersection of St. Charles Street and Aline Avenue in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanLemmie L. Fortenberry02-17-1924Shot and killed after interrupting a robbery at a factoryN/AAt a trunk factory at Baronne Street and Terpsichore Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanJacob Uhle12-24-1924Shot and killed by a man who had just robbed a bankN/AAt the Marine Bank at Frenchman Street and Chartres Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanAnthony Lynch07-07-1925Killed in his patrol car after being hit by another carN/AOn Teche Street near Lamarque Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanWilliam C. Grunwald12-24-1925Shot and killed by a drunk man he was trying to arrest for shooting a youthN/AOn Toledano Street near South Rampart Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanFrank C. Mahen02-05-1926Shot and killed in his patrol car while transporting a man to jail29Near Maple Street and Short Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
DetectiveAlbert Wiebelt01-03-1928Drowned along with Detective Richard Connors after the car they were in crashed through a ferry gate into the Mississippi RiverN/AIn the Mississippi River off of Napoleon Avenue in New Orleans, Louisiana
DetectiveRichard Connors01-03-1928Drowned along with Detective Albert Wiebelt after the car they were in crashed through a ferry gate into the Mississippi RiverN/AIn the Mississippi River off of Napoleon Avenue in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanLester H. Johnson01-23-1930Succumbed to injuries sustained on 01-18-1930 after being shot while trying to arrest a reckless driverN/ANear Esplanade Avenue and North Rampart Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanWilliam Blumstein11-24-1930Shot and killed as he and his partner attempted to arrest 5 robbery suspects41At Philip Street and Magnolia Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanErnest A. Grillot12-24-1930Shot and killed while trying to stop 3 bank robbers30In the Rocheblave branch of the Canal Bank & Trust Company in New Orleans, Louisiana
CorporalGeorge P. Weidert03-09-1932Shot and killed along with Patrolman Albert E. Oestriecher and Patrolman Cornelius L. Ford as a man they were trying to put in a jail cell stole Patrolman Ford's revolver and opened fire40In the New Orleans Police Department 12th Precinct Station in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanCornelius L. Ford03-09-1932Shot and killed along with Patrolman Albert E. Oestriecher and Corporal George P. Weidert as a man they were trying to put in a jail cell stole Patrolman Ford's revolver and opened fire37In the New Orleans Police Department 12th Precinct Station in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanAlbert E. Oestriecher03-09-1932Shot and killed along with Patrolman Albert E. Oestriecher and Corporal George P. Weidert as a man they were trying to put in a jail cell stole Patrolman Ford's revolver and opened fire36In the New Orleans Police Department 12th Precinct Station in New Orleans, Louisiana
CaptainJames Louis Daniels04-16-1933Killed in a car crash while responding to a robbery call46Intersection of Louisiana Avenue Parkway and South Claiborne Avenue in New Orleans, Louisiana
DetectiveJames T. Ford12-01-1934Shot and killed in a telephone booth after an argument with a man54In a telephone booth at the corner of Bienville Street and Basin Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanJames A. Ranna02-04-1938Killed in a motorcycle crashN/AIntersection of Canal Street and South St. Patrick's Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
SergeantJames J. Adams12-27-1940Killed in a car crashN/AIntersection of Pontchartrain Boulevard and Hollygrove Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanHerman O. Raschke06-15-1941Killed in a car crashN/AOn Pontchartrain Boulevard at West End Bridge in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanFred Krummel01-16-1942Killed in a motorcycle crashN/AIntersection of Camp Street and Terpsichore Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanGeorge O'Donnell12-05-1944Killed after being thrown from his horseN/ACorner of Navarre Avenue and Orleans Avenue in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanFrederick L. Braud09-17-1945Killed in a motorcycle crashN/ANear Delechaise Street and South Roman Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanLeslie J. Oster, Sr.07-31-1947Killed in a motorcycle crashN/AOn Gentilly Highway in New Orleans, Louisiana
DetectiveNicholas G. Jacob09-06-1948Killed while transporting a prisoner back from Gulfport, Mississippi; a man filed a false report which required Detective Jacob to get the offender; on the way back, the man shot Detective Jacob in the headN/AN/A
PatrolmanCharles R. Johns01-02-1949Accidentally shot and killed after another Officer's revolver fell and fired24In the 5th Precinct Station of New Orleans Police Department in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanMarvin R. Morton12-29-1950Killed in a car crashN/AOn St. Ann Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanGeorge W. Heaney11-29-1951Killed in a motorcycle crashN/AAt the corner of Loyola Street and Gravier Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanBenson J. Walker08-11-1952Accidentally shot and killed after dropping his revolver while exiting his carN/AOutside the New Orleans Police Department in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanHarold J. Powell01-11-1955Suffered a fatal heart attackN/AAt the 2nd District Station in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanPercival A. Johnson, Sr.09-10-1955Shot and killed after breaking up a disturbance241201 Julia Street, New Orleans, Louisiana 70113
PatrolmanLawrence H. Pool03-14-1956Killed in a motorcycle crashN/AIntersection of Toledano Street and South Roman Street in New Orleans, Lousisana
SergeantPaul L.C. Paretti02-13-1957Shot and stabbed to death after attempting to stop 7 teenage robbers mug a man on his front porch58N/A
PatrolmanAllen Charles Steele10-16-1959Succumbed to injuries sustained several days earlier when he rear ended a bus32Intersection of Chef Menteur Highway and Papania Drive
PatrolmanDennis R. Fremin04-18-1961Killed in a car crashN/AN/A
PatrolmanJoseph J. Enright, III08-30-1961Accidentally shot and killedN/AN/A
PatrolmanGilbert D. Benitez08-13-1963Shot and killed after a pursuit ended in a crash and the 2 robbery suspects got out and opened fire25At the corner of St. Claude Street and Anthony Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanCharles T. Kramer03-08-1965Suffocated after being exposed to toxic fumesN/AN/A
PatrolmanThomas F. Jackson02-26-1966Shot and killed after a pursuit39On I-10 in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanJames D. Clayton09-12-1966Electrocuted while on duty; exact reason how N/AN/AN/A
SergeantLloyd E. Verrett, Sr.10-05-1967Shot and killed after arriving on scene to a robbery37Inside a bar in Louisiana Avenue in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanDelmar E. Stone06-26-1968Struck and killed on his motorcycle by a delivery truck he was trying to stop32N/A
PatrolmanPeter Edward Bergeron, Jr.12-12-1969Shot and killed after chasing one of several car thieves into an alleyN/AIn an alley near Nelson Street and Hollygrove Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanVictor Leo Bordeaux08-26-1970Killed after his three-wheeled motorcycle was struck by a drunk driver54N/A
CadetAlfred E. Harrell12-31-1972Shot and killed by sniper Mark Essex while working the Central Gate lockup; Essex shot Sergeant Edwin C. Hosli, Sr. a few minutes later, who succumbed to injuries on 03-05-1973.19Orleans Parish Prison
Deputy SuperintendentLouis Joseph Sirgo01-07-1973Shot and killed along with Patrolman Philip J. Coleman, Sr. and Patrolman Paul A. Persigo by Mark Essex, who earlier shot Cadet Alfred E. Harrell and Sergeant Edwin C. Hosli, Sr.48At the Downtown Howard Johnson's hotel, 330 Loyola Ave. in New Orleans
PatrolmanPhilip J. Coleman, Sr.01-07-1973Shot and killed along with Deputy Superintendent Louis Joseph Sirgo and Patrolman Paul A. Persigo by Mark Essex, who earlier shot Cadet Alfred E. Harrell and Sergeant Edwin C. Hosli, Sr.26At the Downtown Howard Johnson's hotel, 330 Loyola Ave. in New Orleans
PatrolmanPaul A. Persigo01-07-1973Shot and killed along with Deputy Superintendent Louis Joseph Sirgo and Patrolman Paul Philip J. Coleman, Sr. by Mark Essex, who earlier shot Cadet Alfred E. Harrell and Sergeant Edwin C. Hosli, Sr.33At the Downtown Howard Johnson's hotel, 330 Loyola Ave. in New Orleans
PatrolmanKasimer Zinga, Sr.02-21-1973Killed in a car crash26N/A
SergeantEdwin C. Hosli, Sr.03-05-1973Succumbed to injuries sustained on 12-31-1972 after being shot along with Cadet Alfred E. Harrell by sniper Mark Essex27Warehouse at the corner of Euphrosine and South Gayoso Streets in New Orleans
PatrolmanDennis J. McInerney02-26-1974Shot and killed before exiting his car at domestic disturbance call35N/A
DetectiveJoseph R. Tardiff, Jr.02-28-1975Shot and killed by a hidden gunman while entering an apartment during a drug bust31In an apartment on St. Peter Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
CaptainThomas J. Albert, Sr.02-21-1979Suffered a fatal heart attack after working an extremely long shift due to over 1,000 striking officers not working48At the 8th District Station in New Orleans, Louisiana
PatrolmanRonald Duplechain11-17-1979Shot and killed while trying to stop a disturbance while off-dutyN/AN/A
PatrolmanGregory J. Neupert11-08-1980Shot and killed while searching 3 men in an area known for high narcotics activity23N/A
Police OfficerNoel Smith02-08-1984Killed in a car crash while responding to a stabbingN/AN/A
Police OfficerThomas Michael Smith08-28-1987Struck and killed by a hit and run driver35N/A
Police OfficerEarl Joseph Hauck, II03-22-1990Shot and killed while trying to arrest an escaped prisoner that stole a security guard's gun22N/A
Police OfficerDarren Ahmed03-14-1991Succumbed to injuries sustained on 03-13-1991 after being struck on his motorcycle by a drunk driver31N/A
Police OfficerTalton E. Jett, Sr.11-17-1992Killed in a car crash while responding to an Officer that needed assistance29N/A
Police OfficerRonald A. Williams, II03-04-1995Shot and killed by his partner and her associate while they robbed the restaurant where he was working security25N/A
Police OfficerChris D. McCormick, Sr.07-17-1996Shot and killed while he and his partner searched for a prowler in a usually quiet neighborhood33N/A
DetectiveJoseph C. Thomas07-18-1996Shot and killed while serving a warrant on a house believed to hold narcotics31N/A
SergeantMorris Cavaliere, Jr.04-26-1998Succumbed to injuries sustained on 04-25-1998 after being struck while on his motorcycle during a wedding procession29N/A
Reserve OfficerJohnnie Mae Clanton06-23-1999Killed in a car crash (as the passenger) while headed to a stabbing call38Intersection of General Meyer Avenue and Southlawn Boulevard in New Orleans, Louisiana
Police OfficerChristopher Wayne Russell08-04-2002Shot and killed after arriving on scene to a bar robbery35At the 1800 block of North Roman Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
Retired Police OfficerAlva Ray Simmons07-10-2004Succumbed to injuries sustained in 1985 from a gunshot wound after arriving on scene to a robbery53On Short Street, in the Carrollton community of New Orleans, Louisiana
Police OfficerGeorge August Tessier, III07-14-2004Struck and killed by a tractor trailer on the side of I-1037I-10 in New Orleans, Louisiana
Police OfficerLaToya Nicole JohnsonShot and killed as she and her partner were serving commitment papers to a man for psychiatric evaluation27N/A
Police OfficerChristopher John Doyle, III11-19-2005Died after contracting a virus during the rescue operations of Hurricane Katrina25N/A
Police OfficerThelonious Anthony Dukes, Sr.11-09-2007Succumbed to injuries sustained on 10-13-2007 after being shot in his home while trying to stop a robbery47N/A
Police OfficerNicola Diane Cotton01-28-2008Shot and killed while attempting to arrest a rape suspect24Off of Earhart Boulevard in New Orleans, Louisiana
Police OfficerAlfred Louis Celestain, Sr.01-11-2010Succumbed to injuries sustained on 01-09-2010 after being struck by a drunk driver who ran a red light54Intersection of St. Charles Avenue and St. Joseph Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
Police Officer IIRodney Renee Thomas07-07-2013Struck and killed by a reckless driver while at a crash scene52On the I-10 High Rise Bridge in New Orleans, Louisiana
Police OfficerDaryle S. Holloway06-20-2015Shot and killed while transporting a suspect to the Central Gate lockup46Intersection of North Claiborne Avenue and Elysian Fields Avenue in New Orleans, Louisiana
Police OfficerVernell Brown, Jr.07-17-2015Succumbed to injuries sustained on 07-12-2015 after being struck by a car while at a separate car fire47At the U.S. Highway 90 and I-10 split
Police OfficerNatasha Maria Hunter06-07-2016Succumbed to injuries sustained on 06-05-2016 after being rear-ended by a drunk driver while blocking lanes for a crash32On I-10 near the Esplanade Avenue exit in New Orleans, Louisiana
Police Officer IJude Williams Lewis11-08-2016Succumbed to injuries sustained on 06-01-2001 after losing control and striking a tree during a pursuit46Intersection of Washington Avenue and Pine Street in New Orleans, Louisiana
Police OfficerMarcus Anthony McNeil10-13-2017Shot and killed as he and 3 other Officers investigated reports of a suspicious man29At the corner of Tara Lane and Lake Forest Boulevard in New Orleans, Louisiana

See also

Related Research Articles

Criminal investigation department

In the United Kingdom and many former British colonies, Criminal Investigation Department (CID) is the generic name for the branch of a police force to which most plainclothes detectives belong. A force's CID is distinct from its Special Branch.

Chicago Police Department principal law enforcement agency of Chicago, Illinois, in the United States

The Chicago Police Department (CPD) is the law enforcement agency of the U.S. city of Chicago, Illinois, under the jurisdiction of the City Council. It is the second largest municipal police department in the United States, behind only the New York City Police Department and larger than the Los Angeles Police Department. It has approximately 13,500 officers and over 1,925 other employees. Tracing its roots back to the year 1835, the Chicago Police Department is one of the oldest modern police forces in the world. The United States Department of Justice has criticized the department for its poor training, lack of oversight and routine use of excessive force.

Chief superintendent is a senior rank in police forces, especially in those organised on the British model.

A division was the usual term for the largest territorial subdivision of most British police forces. In major reforms of police organisation in the 1990s divisions of many forces were restructured and retitled Basic Command Units (BCUs), although as of 2009 some forces continue to refer to them as divisions.

Inspector is both a police rank and an administrative position, both used in a number of contexts. However, it is not an equivalent rank in each police force.

Antoinette Frank American police officer

Antoinette Renee Frank is a former New Orleans police officer who, on March 4, 1995, committed a violent armed robbery at a restaurant which resulted in the killing of two members of the family who ran the establishment, and fellow New Orleans Police Department officer Ronald A. Williams II. She was aided by an accomplice, her boyfriend Rogers Lacaze.

Eddie Jordan (attorney) district attorney for Orleans Parish, Louisiana from 2003 until 2007

Eddie Jack Jordan Jr., was the district attorney for Orleans Parish, Louisiana from 2003 until 2007, when he resigned. A member of the Democratic Party, Jordan was the first African American to have held the elected position. He announced his resignation on October 30, 2007, when a court rendered a large judgment against his office on behalf of white employees that the D.A. had earlier dismissed on account of their race.

Superintendent (Supt), often shortened to "super", is a rank in British police services and in most English-speaking Commonwealth nations. In many Commonwealth countries, the full version is superintendent of police (SP). The rank is also used in most British Overseas Territories and in many former British Colonies. In some countries, such as Italy, the rank of Superintendent is a low rank.

Louisville Metro Police Department

The Louisville Metro Police Department (LMPD) began operations on January 6, 2003, as part of the creation of the consolidated city-county government in Louisville, Kentucky, United States. It was formed by the merger of the Jefferson County Police Department and the Louisville Division of Police. The Louisville Metro Police Department is headed by Chief Steve Conrad. LMPD divides Jefferson County into eight patrol divisions and operates a number of special investigative and support units. In popular culture, the LMPD was the lead agency investigating a serial killer in an episode of Criminal Minds.

Richard Pennington served as Superintendent of the New Orleans Police Department in New Orleans, Louisiana from 1994 to 2002 and Chief of the Atlanta Police Department in Atlanta, Georgia from 2002 to 2010.

Ivory Brandon Harris, known as B-Stupid, is a drug trafficker from New Orleans, Louisiana, United States who gained notoriety when police accused him of committing murders in Houston and New Orleans. After a 2006 arrest and 2007 plea deal he is in a Federal Bureau of Prisons prison as of 2008.

Baton Rouge Police Department

The Baton Rouge Police Department, or BRPD, is the primary law enforcement agency in the city of Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The Chief of Police, as of March 08, 2018, was Murphy Paul.

The United States police-rank model is generally quasi-military in structure. A uniform system of insignia based on that of the US Army and Marine Corps is used to help identify an officer's seniority.

Danziger Bridge shootings

The Danziger Bridge shootings were police shootings that took place on September 4, 2005, at the Danziger Bridge in New Orleans, Louisiana. Six days after Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans, members of the New Orleans Police Department who were allegedly responding to a call of an officer under fire shot and killed two civilians: 17-year-old James Brissette and 40-year-old Ronald Madison. Four other civilians were wounded. All of the victims were African-American. None were armed or had committed any crime. Madison, a mentally disabled man, was shot in the back.

Henry Glover was an African American resident of New Orleans, Louisiana whose charred body was found in a destroyed Chevrolet Malibu on September 2, 2005, parked on a Mississippi River levee. Five current and former officers of the New Orleans Police Department (NOPD) were charged with Glover's death. First to be charged was former NOPD police officer David Warren, a rookie at the time, who was convicted and sentenced to 25 years and 9 months in prison for shooting and killing Glover. Former NOPD police officer Greg McRae was convicted of obstructing justice and other charges in the burning of Glover's body and was sentenced to 17 years and 3 months in prison.

Chief inspector is a rank used in police forces which follow the British model. In countries outside Britain, it is sometimes referred to as chief inspector of police (CIP).

Joint Task Force Gator was a Joint Task Force of the Louisiana National Guard mobilized to provide command and control for state military assets deployed in support of New Orleans Law Enforcement for rescue efforts after Hurricane Katrina. The Joint Task Force operated in New Orleans, Louisiana from September 1, 2005 to February 28, 2009.

Ronal W. Serpas American politician

Ronal W. Serpas is an American university professor at Loyola University New Orleans who served as the Superintendent of the New Orleans Police Department from May, 2010 until his resignation on August 18, 2014, having been appointed to that post by Mayor Mitch Landrieu. He was succeeded as Superintendent by Michael S. Harrison. In 2015, Serpas was appointed co-chair for Law Enforcement Leaders to Reduce Crime and Incarceration. As co-chair, Serpas spearheads a group of nearly 200 current and former police chiefs, sheriffs, federal and state prosecutors, and attorneys general from all 50 states, to urge changes to laws and practices that more effectively fight crime while reducing unnecessary incarceration.

Michael S. Harrison is an American police officer who currently serves as the acting Police Commissioner of the Baltimore City Police Department as he awaits confirmation from the Baltimore City Council. He was formerly the superintendent of the New Orleans Police Department from August 2014 to January 2019. On August 18, 2014, he was appointed by New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu as the interim superintendent after the retirement of former Superintendent Ronal W. Serpas. On October 14, 2014 Harrison was formally named by Landrieu as Superintendent of Police.

References

  1. New Orleans Police Department, City of New Orleans website
  2. Asher, Ruth. History of the New Orleans Police Department (1984)
  3. Bell, Caryn Cossé (1997). Revolution, Romanticism, and the Afro-Creole Protest Tradition in Louisiana 1718-1868. Baton-Rouge: Louisiana State University Press. p. 262.
  4. Vandal, Gilles (1984). The New Orleans Riot of 1866: Anatomy of a Tragedy, Center for Louisiana Studies, p. 137
  5. "Reconstruction I: A State Divided". lsm.crt.state.la.us.
  6. ODMP memorial Hennessey
  7. Odmp memorial Sgt Gabriel Porteous.
  8. http://www.wdsu.com/news/24010161/detail.html NOPD Chief Demotes High-Ranking Officers
  9. http://www.nola.com/crime/index.ssf/2010/06/mayor_and_nopd_chief_announce.html mayor and police chief announce Major Reorganization of Police Force
  10. Brendan McCarthy (March 1, 2011). "Overhaul of NOPD's upper ranks gets Civil Service Commission approval". The Times-Picayune.
  11. "Solving Homicides" (4 July 2015). The Economist. Retrieved 6 July 2015.
  12. "Kim Anh killer appeals death sentence" New Orleans Times-Picayune. Retrieved 2006-10-19.
  13. "Len Davis sentenced to death for murder of Kim Groves".
  14. Horne, Jed (July 2006). Breach of Faith (Kindle ed.). 3093. ISBN   1400065526.
  15. "New Orleans officers charged with murder". 29 December 2006.
  16. "New Orleans cops cleared in bridge shooting". 13 August 2008.
  17. "Danziger Bridge jury form details charges against 5 guilty NOPD officers".
  18. NOPD Captain Jeff Winn fired; had been reassigned after testifying in Henry Glover killing, 25 March 2011, New Orleans TImes-Picayune
  19. Freund, Helen (August 16, 2013). "Ex-NOPD officer pleads guilty to manslaughter, gets 4 years in prison, in slaying of Wendell Allen". NOLA.com. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  20. "NOPD - Consent Decree - City of New Orleans". www.nola.gov.
  21. New release from the US district attorney for the Eastern District of Louisiana "FORMER NOPD OFFICER, MAURICE R. PALMER, SENTENCED FOR TAX EVASION" dated 25 April 2013
  22. Two New Orleans police officers plead guilty in theft, fraud conspiracy, 13 February 2014, by Juliet Linderman, New Orleans TImes-Picayune
  23. Ex-New Orleans detective pleads guilty to sexually assaulting three girls, by Carol Kuruvilla 29 March 2014, NY Daily News
  24. https://www.nola.gov/getattachment/NOPD/Policies/Chapter-41-10-Uniform-Specifications-EFFECTIVE-4-15-18.pdf/
  25. https://www.wwltv.com/article/news/local/nopd-sergeant-has-no-plans-of-slowing-down-even-after-six-decades-on-the-streets/289-600965242?ref=exit-recirc
  26. https://www.nola.com/crime/index.ssf/2018/10/2nd_officer_in_nopd_history_ea.html
  27. http://www.nopjf.org/recruiting/salary.asp New Orleans Police and Justice Foundation: Salary & Benefits
  28. http://www.cityofno.com/portal.aspx?portal=50&tabid=45 City of New Orleans - Police Department: Salary & Benefits
  29. "Law Enforcement Management and Administrative Statistics, 2000: Data for Individual State and Local Agencies with 100 or More Officers" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2006-09-27.
  30. New Orleans Police Department: Initial (30-day) After Action Report - Summary Archived
  31. Treaster, Joseph B.; Newman, Maria (30 August 2005). "Rescuers Search for Survivors as Higher Death Tolls Are Feared" via NYTimes.com.
  32. "60 New Orleans Police Fired".
  33. "After Katrina: Washed Away?" (PDF). 4 June 2016.
  34. "Improving Recruitment and Retention in the New Orleans Police Department". www.rand.org.