New York Herald

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New York Herald
New-York-Herald-June-20-1861.jpg
Cover of New York Herald on June 20, 1861, covering news of the American Civil War
TypeDaily newspaper
Format Broadsheet
Publisher James Gordon Bennett, Sr.
James Gordon Bennett, Jr.
Founded1835
Ceased publication1924
Headquarters Manhattan
Circulation 84,000 (1861)
New York Herald Building (1908) by architect Stanford White. It was demolished in 1921 New York Herald Building c1895; demolished 1921.jpg
New York Herald Building (1908) by architect Stanford White. It was demolished in 1921

The New York Herald was a large-distribution newspaper based in New York City that existed between 1835 and 1924, when it merged with the New-York Tribune to form the New York Herald Tribune .

New York City Largest city in the United States

The City of New York, usually known as New York City (NYC), or New York (NY), is the most populous city in the United States. With an estimated population of 8,398,748 distributed over a land area of approximately 302.6 square miles (784 km2), it is also the most densely populated major city in the United States. Located at the southern tip of the U.S. state of New York, the city is the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass and one of the world's most populous cities, with a estimated population of 19.9 million people in its metropolitan statistical area and 22.7 million in its combined statistical area. New York City ranks among the cultural and media world capitals, and exerts a significant impact upon commerce, entertainment, research, technology, education, politics, tourism, art, and fashion.

<i>New-York Tribune</i> newspaper

The New-York Tribune was an American newspaper, first established in 1841 by editor Horace Greeley. Between 1842 and 1866, the newspaper bore the name New-York Daily Tribune. From the 1840s through the 1860s it was the dominant Whig Party and then Republican newspaper in the United States. The paper achieved a circulation of approximately 200,000 in the 1850s, making it the largest daily paper then in New York City. The Tribune's editorials were widely read, shared, and copied in other city newspapers, helping to shape national U.S. opinion. It was one of the first papers in the north to send reporters, correspondents, and illustrators to cover the campaigns of the American Civil War.

<i>New York Herald Tribune</i> newspaper

The New York Herald Tribune was a newspaper published between 1924 and 1966. It was created in 1924 when the New York Tribune acquired the New York Herald. It was widely regarded as a "writer's newspaper" and competed with The New York Times in the daily morning market. The paper won at least nine Pulitzer Prizes during its lifetime.

Contents

History

"The New York Herald," December 8, 1862 "The New York Herald".jpg
"The New York Herald," December 8, 1862

The first issue of the paper was published by James Gordon Bennett, Sr., on May 6, 1835. By 1845, it was the most popular and profitable daily newspaper in the United States. [1] In 1861, it circulated 84,000 copies and called itself "the most largely circulated journal in the world." [2] Bennett stated that the function of a newspaper "is not to instruct but to startle and amuse." [3] [4] His politics tended to be anti-Catholic and he had tended to favor the Know-Nothing faction, though he was not particularly anti-immigrant as the Know-Nothing party were.[ citation needed ] During the American Civil War, his policy as expressed by the newspaper was to staunchly support the Democratic Party. Frederic Hudson served as managing editor of the paper from 1846–1866.

A newspaper's circulation is the number of copies it distributes on an average day. Circulation is one of the principal factors used to set advertising rates. Circulation is not always the same as copies sold, often called paid circulation, since some newspapers are distributed without cost to the reader. Readership figures are usually higher than circulation figures because of the assumption that a typical copy of the newspaper is read by more than one person.

American Civil War Civil war in the United States from 1861 to 1865

The American Civil War was a civil war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865, between the North (Union) and the South (Confederacy). The most studied and written about episode in U.S. history, the Civil War began primarily as a result of the long-standing controversy over the enslavement of black people. War broke out in April 1861 when secessionist forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina shortly after Abraham Lincoln had been inaugurated as the President of the United States. The loyalists of the Union in the North, which also included some geographically western and southern states, proclaimed support for the Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States in the South, who advocated for states' rights to uphold slavery.

Bennett turned over control of the paper to his son James Gordon Bennett, Jr. in 1866. Under Gordon Bennett Jr., the paper financed Henry Morton Stanley's expeditions into Africa to find David Livingstone, where they met on November 10, 1871. [5] The paper also supported Stanley's trans-Africa exploration, and in 1879 supported the ill-fated expedition of George W. DeLong to the arctic region.

Henry Morton Stanley Welsh journalist and explorer

Sir Henry Morton Stanley was a Welsh journalist and explorer who was famous for his exploration of central Africa and his search for missionary and explorer David Livingstone. Upon finding Livingstone, Stanley reportedly asked, "Dr. Livingstone, I presume?" Stanley is also known for his search for the source of the Nile, his pioneering work that enabled the plundering of the Congo Basin region by King Leopold II of Belgium, and his command of the Emin Pasha Relief Expedition. He was knighted in 1899.

David Livingstone Scottish explorer and missionary

David Livingstone was a Scottish physician, Congregationalist, and pioneer Christian missionary with the London Missionary Society, an explorer in Africa, and one of the most popular British heroes of the late 19th-century Victorian era. He had a mythical status that operated on a number of interconnected levels: Protestant missionary martyr, working-class "rags-to-riches" inspirational story, scientific investigator and explorer, imperial reformer, anti-slavery crusader, and advocate of commercial and colonial expansion.

Arctic polar region on the Earths northern hemisphere

The Arctic is a polar region located at the northernmost part of Earth. The Arctic consists of the Arctic Ocean, adjacent seas, and parts of Alaska, Finland, Greenland (Denmark), Iceland, Northern Canada, Norway, Russia and Sweden. Land within the Arctic region has seasonally varying snow and ice cover, with predominantly treeless permafrost -containing tundra. Arctic seas contain seasonal sea ice in many places.

In 1874, the Herald ran the infamous New York Zoo hoax, where the front page of the newspaper was devoted entirely to a fabricated story of wild animals getting loose at the Central Park Zoo and attacking numerous people.

Central Park Zoo Zoo in Central Park, Manhattan, New York City

The Central Park Zoo is a small 6.5-acre (2.6 ha) zoo located at the southeast corner of Central Park in New York City. It is part of an integrated system of four zoos and the New York Aquarium managed by the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS). In conjunction with the Central Park Zoo's operations, the WCS offers children's educational programs, is engaged in restoration of endangered species populations, and reaches out to the local community through volunteer programs.

On October 4, 1887, Bennett Jr. sent Julius Chambers to Paris, France to launch a European edition. Bennett himself later moved to Paris, but the New York Herald suffered from his attempt to manage its operation in New York by telegram. In 1916 a Saturday issue of the paper reported that a major financier was found dead poisoned, and then added that in 1901 he was "mysteriously poisoned and narrowly escaped death." [6]

Julius Chambers American journalist

Julius Chambers, F.R.G.S., was an American author, editor, journalist, travel writer, and activist against psychiatric abuse.

In 1924, after Bennett Jr.'s death, the New York Herald was acquired by its smaller rival the New York Tribune , to form the New York Herald Tribune . In 1959, the New York Herald Tribune and its European edition were sold to John Hay Whitney, then the U.S. ambassador to Britain. In 1966, the New York paper ceased publication. The Washington Post and The New York Times acquired joint control of the European edition, renaming it the International Herald Tribune . Today, the IHT, renamed The New York Times International Edition , is owned entirely by The New York Times and remains an English language paper, printed at 35 sites around the world and for sale in more than 180 countries.

John Hay "Jock" Whitney was U.S. Ambassador to the United Kingdom, publisher of the New York Herald Tribune, and president of the Museum of Modern Art. He was a member of the Whitney family.

<i>The Washington Post</i> Daily broadsheet newspaper published in Washington, D.C.

The Washington Post is a major American daily newspaper published in Washington, D.C., with a particular emphasis on national politics and the federal government. It has the largest circulation in the Washington metropolitan area. Its slogan "Democracy Dies in Darkness" began appearing on its masthead in 2017. Daily broadsheet editions are printed for the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia.

<i>The New York Times</i> Daily broadsheet newspaper based in New York City

The New York Times is an American newspaper based in New York City with worldwide influence and readership. Founded in 1851, the paper has won 127 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper. The Times is ranked 17th in the world by circulation and 2nd in the U.S.

When the Herald was still under the authority of its original publisher Bennett, it was considered to be the most invasive and sensationalist of the leading New York papers. Its ability to entertain the public with timely daily news made it the leading circulation paper of its time.

Evening Telegram

The New York Evening Telegram was founded in 1867 by the junior Bennett, and was considered by many to be an evening edition of the Herald. Frank Munsey acquired the Telegram in 1920, which ceased its connection to the Herald. [7]

Commemorated

Minerva, the Bellringers, and Owls by Antonin Carles Statue of Minerva, the Bell Ringers, and Owls.jpg
Minerva, the Bellringers, and Owls by Antonin Carles

New York's Herald Square is named after the New York Herald newspaper; in the north side of the square there is a sculpture commemorating the Bennetts. The statue of Minerva, the Bellringers, and Owls by Antonin Carles originally graced the New York Herald building and rang every hour until it was moved to Herald Square. The chorus of Give My Regards to Broadway includes the phrase, "[R]emember me to Herald Square." North of Herald Square is Times Square, which is named after rival The New York Times .

See also

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James Gordon Bennett Jr. American publisher

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James Gordon Bennett Sr. American publisher

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References

  1. Crouthamel, James (1989). Bennett's New York Herald and the Rise of the Popular Press. Syracuse University Press. The finished four-page Herald with its circulation of twelve thousand was in 1845 the most popular and profitable daily newspaper in the United States. Its niche was so secure that its success seemed almost inevitable. But Bennett was fifty years old, and his success had come very late, after many years of apparent failure. ...
  2. Sandburg, Carl (1942). Storm Over the Land. Harcourt, Brace and Company. p. 87.
  3. Katherine Roeder (25 March 2014). Wide Awake in Slumberland: Fantasy, Mass Culture, and Modernism in the Art of Winsor McCay. Univ. Press of Mississippi. pp. 28–. ISBN   978-1-62674-117-1.
  4. New Outlook. Outlook Publishing Company, Incorporated. 1892. pp. 489–.
  5. Carey, John (March 18, 2007). "A good man in Africa ?". The Sunday Times . Retrieved 2007-11-15. His quest to find David Livingstone was financed by his paper, the New York Herald. Nothing had been heard of the great explorer since the previous year, when he was somewhere on Lake Tanganyika.
  6. "Jacques S. Halle dies". New York Herald. December 2, 1916. p. 5.
  7. "The Telegram Sold to Scripps-Howard". The New York Times. 12 February 1927.