New York Herald

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New York Herald
New-York-Herald-June-20-1861.jpg
Cover of New York Herald on June 20, 1861, covering news of the American Civil War
TypeDaily newspaper
Format Broadsheet
Publisher James Gordon Bennett, Sr.
James Gordon Bennett, Jr.
Founded1835
Ceased publication1924
Headquarters Manhattan
Circulation 84,000 (1861)
New York Herald Building (1908) by architect Stanford White. It was demolished in 1921 New York Herald Building c1895; demolished 1921.jpg
New York Herald Building (1908) by architect Stanford White. It was demolished in 1921
Francois Flameng (1856-1923), A winter evening in a crowded Herald Square at the New York Herald Building, oil on board 62.4 x 52.4 cm, signed l.r. and dated 1909. Provenance: Simonis & Buunk Fine Art, The Netherlands. Simonis & Buunk, Francois Flameng, A winter evening in a crowded Herald Square at the New York Herald Building.jpg
François Flameng (1856-1923), A winter evening in a crowded Herald Square at the New York Herald Building, oil on board 62.4 x 52.4 cm, signed l.r. and dated 1909. Provenance: Simonis & Buunk Fine Art, The Netherlands.

The New York Herald was a large-distribution newspaper based in New York City that existed between 1835 and 1924, when it merged with the New-York Tribune to form the New York Herald Tribune .

Contents

History

"The New York Herald," December 8, 1862 "The New York Herald".jpg
"The New York Herald," December 8, 1862

The first issue of the paper was published by James Gordon Bennett, Sr., on May 6, 1835. By 1845, it was the most popular and profitable daily newspaper in the United States. [1] In 1861, it circulated 84,000 copies and called itself "the most largely circulated journal in the world." [2] Bennett stated that the function of a newspaper "is not to instruct but to startle and amuse." [3] [4] His politics tended to be anti-Catholic and he had tended to favor the Know-Nothing faction, though he was not particularly anti-immigrant as the Know-Nothing party were.[ citation needed ] During the American Civil War, his policy as expressed by the newspaper was to staunchly support the Democratic Party. Frederic Hudson served as managing editor of the paper from 1846 to 1866.

Bennett turned over control of the paper to his son James Gordon Bennett, Jr. in 1866. Under Gordon Bennett Jr., the paper financed Henry Morton Stanley's expeditions into Africa to find David Livingstone, where they met on November 10, 1871. [5] The paper also supported Stanley's trans-Africa exploration, and in 1879 supported the ill-fated expedition of George W. DeLong to the arctic region.

In 1874, the Herald ran the New York Zoo hoax, [6] [7] where the front page of the newspaper was devoted entirely to a fabricated story of wild animals getting loose at the Central Park Zoo and attacking numerous people.

On October 4, 1887, Bennett Jr. sent Julius Chambers to Paris, France to launch a European edition. Bennett himself later moved to Paris, but the New York Herald suffered from his attempt to manage its operation in New York by telegram. In 1916 a Saturday issue of the paper reported that a major financier was found dead poisoned, and then added that in 1901 he was "mysteriously poisoned and narrowly escaped death." [8]

In 1924, after Bennett Jr.'s death, the New York Herald was acquired by its smaller rival the New York Tribune , to form the New York Herald Tribune . In 1959, the New York Herald Tribune and its European edition were sold to John Hay Whitney, then the U.S. ambassador to the UK. In 1966, the New York paper ceased publication. The Washington Post and The New York Times acquired joint control of the European edition, renaming it the International Herald Tribune . The IHT, renamed The New York Times International Edition , is now wholly owned by The New York Times . [9]

When the Herald was still under the authority of its original publisher Bennett, it was considered to be the most invasive and sensationalist of the leading New York papers. Its ability to entertain the public with timely daily news made it the leading circulation paper of its time.

Evening Telegram

The New York Evening Telegram was founded in 1867 by the junior Bennett, and was considered by many to be an evening edition of the Herald. Frank Munsey acquired the Telegram in 1920, which ceased its connection to the Herald. [10]

Commemorated

Minerva, the Bellringers, and Owls by Antonin Carles Statue of Minerva, the Bell Ringers, and Owls.jpg
Minerva, the Bellringers, and Owls by Antonin Carles

New York's Herald Square is named after the New York Herald newspaper; [11] in the north side of the square is a sculpture commemorating the Bennetts. The statue of Minerva, the Bellringers, and Owls by Antonin Carles originally graced the New York Herald building and rang every hour until it was moved to Herald Square. The chorus of Give My Regards to Broadway includes the phrase "[R]emember me to Herald Square." North of Herald Square is Times Square, which is named after rival The New York Times .

See also

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References

  1. Crouthamel, James (1989). Bennett's New York Herald and the Rise of the Popular Press. Syracuse University Press. The finished four-page Herald with its circulation of twelve thousand as in 1845 the most popular and profitable daily newspaper in the United States. Its niche was so secure that its success seemed almost inevitable. But Bennett was fifty years old, and his success had come very late, after many years of apparent failure. ...
  2. Sandburg, Carl (1942). Storm Over the Land. Harcourt, Brace and Company. p. 87.
  3. Katherine Roeder (March 25, 2014). Wide Awake in Slumberland: Fantasy, Mass Culture, and Modernism in the Art of Winsor McCay. Univ. Press of Mississippi. pp. 28–. ISBN   978-1-62674-117-1.
  4. New Outlook. Outlook Publishing Company, Incorporated. 1892. pp. 489–.
  5. Carey, John (March 18, 2007). "A good man in Africa ?". The Sunday Times . Retrieved November 15, 2007. His quest to find David Livingstone was financed by his paper, the New York Herald. Nothing had been heard of the great explorer since the previous year, when he was somewhere on Lake Tanganyika.
  6. Robert E. Bartholomew; Benjamin Radford (October 19, 2011). The Martians Have Landed!: A History of Media-Driven Panics and Hoaxes. McFarland. pp. 84–85. ISBN   978-0-7864-8671-7.
  7. Connery, T. B. (June 3, 1893). A Famous Newspaper Hoax, Harper's Weekly , p. 534
  8. "Jacques S. Halle dies". New York Herald. December 2, 1916. p. 5.
  9. Doreen Carvajal (June 24, 2008). "The Times and I.H.T. Study Web Merger". The New York Times .
  10. "The Telegram Sold to Scripps-Howard". The New York Times. February 12, 1927.
  11. Eve Zibart (2010). The Unofficial Guide to New York City. p. 1678. ISBN   0470637234.