Out of print

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An out-of-print (OOP) or out-of-commerce item or work, such as a book, is something that is no longer being published. The term applies to all types of printed matter, visual media, sound recordings, and video recordings. [1]

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References

  1. European Bureau of Library, Information and Documentation Associations (September 20, 2011). "Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) on Key Principles on the Digitisation and Making Available of Out-of-Commerce Works – Frequently Asked Questions" (PDF) (Press release). Retrieved April 6, 2019.