Progressive realism

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Progressive realism is an American foreign policy paradigm largely made popular by Robert Wright in 2006 [1] which focuses on producing measurable results in pursuit of widely supported goals. [2] It supports stronger international institutions, free trade, and US national interests. [2] Progressive realists' beliefs are similar to neoconservatives in that foreign interests, such as national defense and participation in the United Nations, serves national interests. [3] They feel that economic interdependence, the environment and global security makes international governance serve national interest. [3] [4] The policy emphasizes the need to convert "hard" military power and "soft" attractive power into "smart" power. [5]

United States Federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country comprising 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the largest city by population is New York City. Forty-eight states and the capital's federal district are contiguous in North America between Canada and Mexico. The State of Alaska is in the northwest corner of North America, bordered by Canada to the east and across the Bering Strait from Russia to the west. The State of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The U.S. territories are scattered about the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, stretching across nine official time zones. The extremely diverse geography, climate, and wildlife of the United States make it one of the world's 17 megadiverse countries.

A country's foreign policy, also called foreign relations or foreign affairs policy, consists of self-interest strategies chosen by the state to safeguard its national interests and to achieve goals within its international relations milieu. The approaches are strategically employed to interact with other countries. The study of such strategies is called foreign policy analysis. In recent times, due to the deepening level of globalization and transnational activities, the states will also have to interact with non-state actors. The aforementioned interaction is evaluated and monitored in attempts to maximize the benefits of multilateral international cooperation. Since the national interests are paramount, foreign policies are designed by the government through high-level decision-making processes. National interests accomplishment can occur as a result of peaceful cooperation with other nations, or through exploitation. Usually, creating foreign policy is the job of the head of government and the foreign minister. In some countries, the legislature also has considerable effects. Foreign policies of countries have varying rates of change and scopes of intent, which can be affected by factors that change the perceived national interests or even affect the stability of the country itself. The foreign policy of a country can have a profound and lasting impact on many other countries and on the course of international relations as a whole, such as the Monroe Doctrine conflicting with the mercantilism policies of 19th-century European countries and the goals of independence of newly formed Central American and South American countries.

Robert Wright (journalist) American journalist, born 1957

Robert Wright is an American journalist who writes about science, history and religion, including The Evolution of God, Nonzero: The Logic of Human Destiny, The Moral Animal, Why Buddhism is True, and Three Scientists and Their Gods: Looking for Meaning in an Age of Information. He is the co-founder and editor-in-chief of Bloggingheads.tv. He is a Senior Fellow at New America, a think tank that has been described as radical centrist in orientation.

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References

  1. Hynd, Steve (June 23, 2009). "Progressive Realism And Iran" . Retrieved January 10, 2010.
  2. 1 2 Greg Anrig (July 20, 2006). "Why democrats should pursue "progressive realism" at home" . Retrieved December 17, 2010.
  3. 1 2 Wright, Robert (December 31, 1969). "'Progressive realism': In search of a foreign policy - Editorials & Commentary - International Herald Tribune". The New York Times. Retrieved January 10, 2011.
  4. Nye, Joseph (August 21, 2006). "Progressive Realism" . Retrieved January 10, 2011.
  5. Nye, Joseph (August 31, 2006). "Progressive realism in foreign policy" . Retrieved January 13, 2011.