Raleigh and Gaston Railroad

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Cornerstone of the Raleigh and Gaston railroad building of Raleigh, NC Raleigh And Gaston Building Cornerstone-20080912.jpeg
Cornerstone of the Raleigh and Gaston railroad building of Raleigh, NC

The Raleigh and Gaston Railroad was a Raleigh, North Carolina-based railroad opened in April 1840 [1] between Raleigh and the town of Gaston, North Carolina, on the Roanoke River. It was North Carolina's second railroad (the Wilmington and Raleigh Railroad opened one month earlier). The length was 100 miles (160 km) and built with 4 ft 8 in (1,422 mm) gauge. [2] The Raleigh and Gaston's tracks remains in service today as part of CSX's S Line as the Norlina Subdivision of CSX's Florence Division.

Raleigh, North Carolina Capital of North Carolina

Raleigh is the capital of the state of North Carolina and the seat of Wake County in the United States. Raleigh is the second-largest city in the state, after Charlotte. Raleigh is known as the "City of Oaks" for its many oak trees, which line the streets in the heart of the city. The city covers a land area of 142.8 square miles (370 km2). The U.S. Census Bureau estimated the city's population as 479,332 as of July 1, 2018. It is one of the fastest-growing cities in the country. The city of Raleigh is named after Sir Walter Raleigh, who established the lost Roanoke Colony in present-day Dare County.

Gaston, North Carolina Town in North Carolina, United States

Gaston is a town in Northampton County, North Carolina, United States. The population was 1,152 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina Micropolitan Statistical Area.

Roanoke River river in Virginia and North Carolina, United States

The Roanoke River is a river in southern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina in the United States, 410 miles (660 km) long. A major river of the southeastern United States, it drains a largely rural area of the coastal plain from the eastern edge of the Appalachian Mountains southeast across the Piedmont to Albemarle Sound. An important river throughout the history of the United States, it was the site of early settlement in the Virginia Colony and the Carolina Colony. An 81-mile (130 km) section of its lower course in Virginia between the Leesville Lake and Kerr Lake is known as the Staunton River, pronounced, as is the Shenandoah Valley city of that name. It is impounded along much of its middle course to form a chain of reservoirs.

Contents

History

Norlina Subdivision
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former Seaboard Air Line Railroad
to Petersburg, Virginia
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BSicon BST.svg
S 103.5
Norlina
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S 106.7
Middleburg
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S 113.8
Henderson
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Henderson Yard
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S 122.6
Kittrell
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S 129.7
Franklinton
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S 136.4
Youngsville
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S 140.2
Wake Forest
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S 154.7
Edgeton
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CSX

The railroad built the Franklinton Depot in 1886. [3] It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1990. [4]

Franklinton Depot

Franklinton Depot, also known as the Raleigh and Gaston Railroad Passenger Depot and Franklinton Woman's Club Clubhouse, is a historic train station located at 201 East Mason Street in Franklinton, Franklin County, North Carolina. It was built by the Raleigh and Gaston Railroad in 1886, and is a one-story, rectangular frame building with Italianate, Queen Anne, and Gothic Revival style design elements. The main section measures 51 feet by 16 feet, with an attached 10 feet by 12 feet baggage room. The main section has a steeply pitched gable roof and baggage room a low-pitched hip roof. It was moved to its present location in 1973 when acquired by the Franklinton Woman's Club as a clubhouse.

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

The Raleigh and Gaston Railroad merged with the Seaboard Air Line Railroad in 1900 and became a segment of their main line. Seaboard eventually became the Seaboard Coast Line Railroad in 1967 and then CSX Transportation by 1986. CSX abandoned the S Line (the designation for the former Seaboard Air Line main line) north of Norlina into Virginia in 1985 (the next active segment of the S Line north is CSX's Bellwood Subdivision). [5]

Seaboard Air Line Railroad former American railroad (1900-1967)

The Seaboard Air Line Railroad, which styled itself "The Route of Courteous Service," was an American railroad which existed from April 14, 1900, until July 1, 1967, when it merged with the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, its longtime rival, to form the Seaboard Coast Line Railroad. Predecessor railroads dated from the 1830s and reorganized extensively to rebuild after the American Civil War. The company was headquartered in Norfolk, Virginia, until 1958, when its main offices were relocated to Richmond, Virginia. The Seaboard Air Line Railway Building in Norfolk's historic Freemason District still stands and has been converted into apartments.

The Seaboard Coast Line Railroad is a former Class I railroad company operating in the Southeastern United States beginning in 1967. Its passenger operations were taken over by Amtrak in 1971. Eventually, the railroad was merged with its affiliate lines to create the Seaboard System in 1983.

CSX Transportation railway system in the United States of America

CSX Transportation is a Class I railroad operating in the eastern United States and the Canadian provinces of Ontario and Quebec. The railroad operates approximately 21,000 route miles (34,000 km) of track. The company operates as a subsidiary of CSX Corporation, a Fortune 500 company headquartered in Jacksonville, Florida.

List of stations

Below is a list of stations along the Raleigh and Gaston railroad: [6]

Millbrook, North Carolina village in Wake County, North Carolina, United States of America

Millbrook, North Carolina, USA, was a village in Wake County at that time in the intersection of then Wake Forest Road and then Main Street, which is now part of East Millbrook Road. However, the growth of Raleigh since the 1970s has swallowed up the village. Milbrook High School in Raleigh is named after the village and is located in what used to be Millbrook.

Neuse is an unincorporated community in Neuse Township, Wake County, North Carolina, United States. Located on the Neuse River, it is about 9 miles north-northeast of downtown Raleigh.

Forestville is a formerly unincorporated community in Wake County, North Carolina, United States, east of Falls, North Carolina at an elevation of 390 feet or 119 m. It currently lies within the town of Wake Forest south of the intersection of NC 98 and US 1 Alternate.

See also

Raleigh and Gaston / Seaboard Coast Line Building

The Raleigh and Gaston / Seaboard Coast Line Building is an historic building in Raleigh, North Carolina, that was once home to the Raleigh and Gaston Railroad and subsequently the Raleigh office of the Seaboard Coast Line Railroad. The three story brick building is one of Raleigh's earliest surviving office buildings and served as a railroad office for more than 100 years.

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<i>Silver Star</i> (Amtrak train) Amtrak train route between New York and Miami, Florida

The Silver Star is a 1,522-mile (2,449 km) passenger train route in the Silver Service brand operated by Amtrak, running from New York City south to Miami, Florida via the Northeast Corridor to Washington, D.C., then via Richmond, Virginia; Raleigh, North Carolina; Columbia, South Carolina; Savannah, Georgia; Jacksonville, Florida; Orlando, Florida; and Tampa, Florida.

Most CSX railroad lines are given lettered prefixes before milepost numbers. These prefixes are one to three letters long with the first letter usually refer to the former company. For instance, prefixes beginning with "S" were part of the Seaboard Air Line Railroad. Some of these company prefixes include the following:

Florida Railroad Museum Railroad museum

The Florida Railroad Museum is a railroad museum located in Parrish, Florida. The museum operates a heritage railroad and offers round-trip tourist excursions along six miles of the former Seaboard Air Line Sarasota Subdivision in Manatee County between Parrish and Willow.

Ocala Union Station

The Ocala Union Station is a historic site in Ocala, Florida, United States. It is located at 531 Northeast First Avenue, and was built in 1917 by both the Atlantic Coast Line and Seaboard Air Line Railroads. Prior to this, ACL and SAL had separate depots in Ocala. The former ACL station was originally built by the Florida Southern Railroad, while the former SAL station was built by the Florida Transit and Peninsular Railroad. On December 22, 1997, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.

Raleigh Union Station intermodal transit station in Raleigh, North Carolina

Raleigh Union Station is an intermodal transit station in Raleigh, North Carolina, United States. Train service began the morning of July 10, 2018. Its main building serves as an Amtrak train station, while a future adjacent building will serve as the bus terminus for GoTriangle. The station is located at the Boylan Wye, a railroad junction used by CSX and Norfolk Southern, and adjacent to the Depot Historic District in downtown Raleigh.

The Seaboard Air Line Depot can refer to the following former and active train stations previously used by the Seaboard Air Line Railroad, many of which are listed on the National Register of Historic Places:

Tampa Southern Railroad

The Tampa Southern Railroad was a subsidiary of the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad originally running from Uceta Yard in Tampa south to Palmetto, Bradenton, and Sarasota with a later extension southeast to Fort Ogden in the Peace River valley built shortly after. It was one of many rail lines built during the Florida land boom of the 1920s. Most of the remaining trackage now serves as CSX Transportation's Palmetto Subdivision. Another short portion just east of Sarasota also remains that now serves as Seminole Gulf Railway's Matoaka branch.

The Brooker Subdivision is a railroad line owned by CSX Transportation in Florida. The line runs from the CSX S Line at Wannee Junction in Starke to Newberry for a total of 39.6 miles. At its north end it continues south from the Wildwood Subdivision and at its south end it junctions at a wye with the Florida Northern Railroad.

The Kingsland Subdivision is a railroad line owned by CSX Transportation in Northeast Florida. The line begins in Jacksonville at a junction with the A Line near Moncrief Yard. From there, it heads east and then turns north near Panama Park. From Panama Park, the Kingsland Subdivision heads north to Yulee on a discontinuous piece of CSX's S Line. In Yulee, the line connects with the First Coast Railroad, which operates north to Seals, Georgia on tracks that were previously part of the Kingsland Subdivision prior to 2005.

Tampa Terminal Subdivision

The Tampa Terminal Subdivision is a railroad line owned by CSX Transportation in Florida. The Tampa Terminal Subdivision covers track around Yeoman and Uceta Yards and is located at the end of two of CSX's main lines to Jacksonville and points north, the A Line and the S Line. The S Line is CSX's main freight route through Peninsular Florida. Some freight operates on the A Line and all Amtrak passenger service operates on the A Line.

The Valrico Subdivision is a railroad line owned and operated by CSX Transportation in Central Florida. The line runs from a junction with the CSX S Line in Valrico east and south to Bowling Green for a total of 47 miles. It also junctions with the Plant City Subdivision at Welcome, the Brewster Subdivision at Edison, and the Achan Subdivision at South Mulberry.

The Wildwood Subdivision is a railroad line owned by CSX Transportation in Florida. It runs along CSX’s S Line from Baldwin south to Zephyrhills via Ocala and Wildwood for a total of 155.7 miles.

The Aberdeen Subdivision is a railroad line owned by CSX Transportation in North Carolina. The line runs along CSX's S Line from Raleigh, North Carolina to Marston, North Carolina for a total of 86.9 miles. At its north end it continues south from the Norlina Subdivision and at its south end it continues south as the Hamlet Terminal Subdivision.

North End Subdivision

The North End Subdivision is a railroad line owned by CSX Transportation in Virginia and North Carolina. The line runs from Richmond, Virginia to Rocky Mount, North Carolina for a total of 123.2 miles. At its north end the line continues south from the Richmond Terminal Subdivision and at its south end the line continues south as the South End Subdivision. The North End Subdivision is the northernmost segment of CSX's A Line which in its entirety runs from Richmond to Tampa, Florida. Some of the line's notable features include running in the median of Interstate 195 in Richmond as well as the line's tall arch bridge over the James River.

The Bellwood Subdivision is a railroad line owned by CSX Transportation in Virginia, United States. The line runs along CSX's S Line from Richmond, Virginia to Bellwood, Virginia for a total of 14.4 miles. At its north end the line continues south from the Richmond Terminal Subdivision and at its south end the line continues south as the North End Subdivision.

South End Subdivision

The South End Subdivision is a railroad line owned by CSX Transportation in the U.S. states of North Carolina and South Carolina. The line runs from Rocky Mount, North Carolina to Florence, South Carolina for a total of 172.8 miles. At its north end the line continues south from the North End Subdivision and at its south end the line continues south as the Charleston Subdivision. The South End Subdivision is a part of CSX's A Line, one of their mainline which ultimately extends from Richmond, Virginia to Tampa, Florida.

References

  1. The Raleigh and Gaston Railroad
  2. Confederate Railroads - Raleigh & Gaston
  3. T .H. Pearce and Michael T. Southern (October 1990). "Franklinton Depot" (pdf). National Register of Historic Places - Nomination and Inventory. North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office. Retrieved 2014-11-01.
  4. National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  5. "The Norlina Subdivision". Rails in Virginia. Retrieved 28 November 2018.
  6. "North Carolina Railroads - Raleigh & Gaston Railroad". www.carolana.com. Retrieved 2018-04-26.