Ray Rissmiller

Last updated
Ray Rissmiller
No. 77, 74
Position: Offensive tackle
Personal information
Born: (1942-07-22) July 22, 1942 (age 79)
Easton, Pennsylvania
Height:6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Weight:250 lb (113 kg)
Career information
High school: Easton (PA)
College: Georgia
NFL Draft: 1965  / Round: 2 / Pick: 20
AFL Draft: 1965  / Round:  8  / Pick: 64
Career history
Career NFL statistics
Games played:16
Games started:11
Player stats at NFL.com  ·  PFR

Raymond Harold Rissmiller (born July 22, 1942) is a former American football offensive tackle in the National Football League for the Philadelphia Eagles and the New Orleans Saints. He also played in the American Football League for the Buffalo Bills. He played college football at Georgia.

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