Royal Australasian College of Physicians

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The Royal Australasian College of Physicians (RACP) is a not-for-profit professional organisation responsible for training and educating physicians and trainee physicians in Australia and New Zealand. [1]

Contents

Specialties include paediatrics & child health, cardiology, respiratory medicine, neurology, oncology, public health medicine, occupational and environmental medicine, palliative medicine, sexual health medicine, rehabilitation, and addiction medicine. [2]

The College is responsible for education of trainees and the ongoing education of Fellows of the College. It also publishes two medical journals, The Internal Medicine Journal [3] and The Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, [4] and has a foundation which provides funding for research in the field of internal medicine. [5]

History

Until the 1930s, Australian and New Zealand Physicians had to seek membership of one of the United Kingdom Colleges in London, Glasgow, Ireland or Edinburgh. [1]

In November 1930, a group of physicians met in Melbourne to establish the Association of Physicians of Australasia "for friendship and scientific stimulus", which solely consisted of its members; no building or permanent base existed.

In 1934, the Association of Physicians of Australasia Council decided that an examining and executive body College should be formed to enhance the prestige of the profession, stimulate interest in medical education and research, and set a standard of professional ethical conduct. The constitution was to be modelled on that of the London College.

In 1937, the Association purchased premises at 145 Macquarie Street, Sydney, which had originally been the home of the Fairfax family. Funds were raised by the NSW Government and public donation.

In 1938, the College was incorporated and the first meeting of the Council was held in April. [1]

The motto of "hominum servire saluti" ("to serve the health of our people") was adopted for the College coat of arms.

In September that year 47 candidates took the first examinations and 41 members were admitted.

Structure

The RACP is divided into two Divisions and three Faculties. Each Division has a number of Chapters.

Divisions

Faculties

Chapters

Facilities

The History of Medicine Library at the RACP has a leading collection of medical history items from Australia and around the world. The RACP established the History of Medicine Library in 1938 as a clinical library. The focus of the library changed to medical history in the mid 1950s. The History of Medicine Library continues to grow through the contributions of College Members.

Qualifications

Fellow

The qualification of "Fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians", abbreviated as the post-nominal initials FRACP, is a recognition of the completion of the prescribed postgraduate specialist training programme in internal adult or internal paediatric medicine of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

Arms

Coat of arms of Royal Australasian College of Physicians
Royal Australasian College of Physicians Arms.svg
Notes
The arms of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians consist of: [6]
Crest
On a Wreath of the Colours in front of a Sun rising Or a Hand grasping a Rod of Aesculapius erect proper.
Escutcheon
Azure, a Pomegranate slipped and leaved Or seeded Gules issuant from the chief a Cloud proper irradiated Gold.
Supporters
On the dexter side an Emu, and on the sinister side a Kiwi, both proper.
Motto
Hominum servire saluti
(To serve the health of our people)
Symbolism
The Arms are based on those granted in 1546 to the Royal College of Physicians of London.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "About the RACP". The Royal Australasian College of Physicians.
  2. Senate Inquiry into the Government Investment Funds Amendment Bill 2011 Submission by The Royal Australasian College of Physicians. July 2012
  3. "Internal Medicine Journal". Royal Australasian College of Physicians. Archived from the original on 23 August 2010.
  4. "Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health". Royal Australasian College of Physicians. Archived from the original on 27 September 2013.
  5. "About the RACP Foundation". Royal Australasian College of Physicians. Archived from the original on 7 August 2013. Retrieved 17 August 2013.
  6. Low, Charles (1971). A Roll of Australian Arms. Adelaide: Rigby Limited. p. 6. ISBN   0-85179-149-2.