Shadows (1931 film)

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Shadows
Directed by Alexander Esway
Written by Rodney Ackland
Frank Miller
Produced byAlexander Esway
Starring Jacqueline Logan
Bernard Nedell
Gordon Harker
Molly Lamont
Production
company
Distributed by First National-Pathé Pictures
Release date
17 August 1931
Running time
57 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

Shadows (also known as Press Gang and My Wife's Family) is a 1931 British crime film directed by Alexander Esway and starring Jacqueline Logan, Bernard Nedell and Gordon Harker. [1] The screenplay involves the estranged son of a newspaper owner, who returns to his father's good favour by unmasking a gang of criminals.

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References

  1. BFI.org

Bibliography